HyperCash

Hcash is a decentralised and open-source cross-platform cryptocurrency.

home link https://h.cash/

reference material Whitepaper.pdf

Community

Market
3,699.01 KRW
Exchanges that listed the coin
11
Symbol
HC
Dapp
To be released
Project introduction

Hcash is a decentralized open source cross-platform currency. Hcash is designed to allow exchange of data, not block and chain of blocks..

Executives and partners

Adam Geri

CEO

Andrew wasylewicz

COO

Joesph LIU

Chief Scientist

Shanghai jiao tong uni.

Hong kong Polytechnic Uni.

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Medium

Weekly Development Update

12–18/07/2019The following is a weekly progress report from the HCASH development team. This report is divided in two parts: completed and ongoing work.Our GitHub code can be found here: www.github.com/HcashOrgPlease note: code is being uploaded to GitHub progressively; if you find that something from this document is missing from a repository, please check back periodically.Completed work:HyperCash/HCHcdFixed revokeaitickets interfaceFixed abnormal data synchronisation issueHcwalletModified data structure of walletdbhcGUIOptimised HAILP transaction history displayAdded an interface for testsReleased V2.2.1 BetaReleased V2.2.2 BetaHcwikiCompleted HAILP documentationCompleted AINODE documentationHcAutonomyMonitored proposal voting dataHyperExchange/HXHX coreOptimised secure random number interfaceOptimised Undertaker, allowing users to customise integration tests for operationsHX IndicatorFixed bug; confirmation window did not appear on transaction pageHX ToolsAdded support for Python on contractAdded delegateCall on underlying contractOngoing work:HyperCash/HCHcdContinue HAILP public beta and fix bugsOptimise codeHcwalletContinue HAILP public beta and fix bugsOptimise codehcGUIContinue to run tests for HAILP transactionsHcwikiAdd interface documentHcAutonomyFollow up with the newly released proposalHyperExchange/HXHX coreAllow multi-signature addresses to participate in voting miningFix bug; parameters in Chinese not supported in contract callsHX IndicatorAllow users to transfer account names to other usersHX IDEAdjust debugger to adapt the latest version of the virtual machineAdd delegateCall on integration contractHX ToolsRun tests for delegateCall on underlying contractWe are grateful for the immense effort made by all contributors. Each contributor and community member is vital to the technical development of the HCASH ecosystem.To stay up to date with information, or to join our community, check out the following channels:Twitter, Facebook, Reddit, English Telegram, Chinese Telegram, Korean Telegram, Korean Announcements, KakaoTalk, Naver Blog

HyperCash

19. 07. 19

Weekly Development Update

05 — 11 July 2019The following is a weekly progress report from the HCASH development team. This report is divided in two parts: completed and ongoing work.Our GitHub code can be found here: www.github.com/HcashOrgPlease note: code is being uploaded to GitHub progressively; if you find that something from this document is missing from a repository, please check back periodically.Completed work:HyperCash/HCHcdOptimised algorithm for block data warehousingOptimised logic that is used to deal with block transaction conflictsHcwalletOptimised algorithm address searchingFixed token sending failure issues that occasionally occur on HAILPModified algorithm for transaction data warehousingOptimised AITicket voting algorithmhcGUIOptimised codeHcOMNIFixed bug; ENTC tokens cannot be displayed on HC Omni explorerHcAutonomyReleased new proposal for HAILP deployment and block reward distribution adjustmentHyperExchange/HXHX coreAdded interface to allow users to review current pledging weightOptimised Undertaker, allowing users to customise unit tests for operationsCompleted integration tests on new feature that allows users to transfer account names to other usersReleased V1.2.23HX IndicatorAdded Citizen Resolution voting featureHX IDEUpgraded HX test client on IDEOngoing work:HyperCash/HCHcdContinue HAILP public beta and fix bugsOptimise codeHcwalletContinue HAILP public beta and fix bugsOptimise codehcGUIOptimise HAILP transaction history searchingHcwikiAdd introduction of HAILPAdd interface documentAdd introduction of AInodeHcAutonomyFollow up with the newly released proposalHyperExchange/HXHX coreOptimise Undertaker, allowing users to customise integration tests for operationsFix bug; parameters in Chinese not supported in contract callsHX IndicatorAllow users to transfer account names to other usersHX IDEAdjust debugger to adapt the latest version of the virtual machineHX ToolsAdd support for Python on contractAdd delegateCall on underlying contractWe are grateful for the immense effort made by all contributors. Each contributor and community member is vital to the technical development of the HCASH ecosystem.To stay up to date with information, or to join our community, check out the following channels:Twitter, Facebook, Reddit, English Telegram, Chinese Telegram, Korean Telegram, Korean Announcements, KakaoTalk, Naver Blog

HyperCash

19. 07. 12

New Proposal for HAILP Depl...

Having fully developed the HCASH AI Lightning Protocol (HAILP), the HCASH tech team is now proposing its deployment on the HyperCash mainnet, along with a block reward distribution adjustment.Proposal BackgroundOn June 26th, 2019, the HCASH Foundation announced that the development of HCASH AI lightning protocol (HAILP) had been completed, with network testing to commence on July 1st. Testing during the public beta has been running smoothly and is expected to finish on July 31st.The launch of HAILP is a fundamental component in the development of HCASH, enabling real-time payments, low-cost transactions, scalability, and privacy preservation — not only on the HC blockchain, but with the possibility of implementation in other mainnet crypto assets. This opens the market for practical third-party HCASH applications, supporting the process of the widespread adoption of blockchain technology.Therefore, the implementation of HAILP on the HyperCash mainnet is an important task after the conclusion of the public beta.As an additional supportive measure, the HCASH tech team have decided to adjust the block reward distribution ratio.For detailed information, please refer to the proposal details below.Implementation Plan1. What is to be completedHAILP deployment.Block reward distribution adjustment. The current block reward distribution ratio is PoS:PoW:Dev Team = 6:3:1. After the upgrade, the block reward distribution ratio will be Pow:Pos:AInode:Dev Team = 3:3:3:1.Upgrade HC mainnet and components to V3.0.0.2. How to upgradeThe mainnet is to be upgraded at block height 206,666. This is estimated to occur at 20:00 on the 31st of July 2019 (GMT+8).Users should upgrade all HC programs (i.e. hcGui/hcd/hcctl/hcwallet) to V3.0.0 before block height 206,666.PoS miners should upgrade all HC programs (i.e. hcGui/hcd/hcctl/hcwallet) to V3.0.0 before the block height reaches 206,666 to avoid unnecessary mining losses.Users who want to become an AInode should upgrade all HC programs (i.e. hcGui/hcd/hcctl/hcwallet) to V3.0.0 before the block height reaches 206,666. Users must then deposit no less than 1000 HC to their wallet to register as an AInode. To encourage AInodes to provide the HC mainnet with stable and consistent support, they can obtain transaction fees (0.1%) from HAILP transactions, in addition to block rewards.Exchanges and wallets should upgrade all HC programs (i.e. hcGui/hcd/hcctl/hcwallet) to V3.0.0 before the block height reaches 206,666 to avoid unnecessary HC deposit/withdrawal suspension.3. Voting periodThe algorithm upgrade proposal will be able to be viewed by the public for one week prior to voting (10–15 July 2019, GMT+8)The voting period will then run for one week (16–22 July 2019, GMT+8)4. The proposal will be approved only when it meets the following requirements:The total number of votes that participate in proposal voting is no less than 75% of the total number of votes on-chain (i.e. a 75% involvement rate).The number of votes in favour of the proposal is no less than 75% of the total number of votes that participate in proposal voting.Note: If the proposal is approved by the community, the HCASH team will inform relevant exchanges, mining pools and wallets to complete the upgrade. It is possible that some may suspend HC deposit/withdrawal services.To stay up to date with information, or to join our community, check out the following channels:Twitter, Facebook, Reddit, English Telegram, Chinese Telegram, Korean Telegram, Korean Announcements, KakaoTalk, Naver Blog

HyperCash

19. 07. 10

Weekly Development Update

28 June–4 July 2019The following is a weekly progress report from the HCASH development team. This report is divided in two parts: completed and ongoing work.Our GitHub code can be found here: www.github.com/HcashOrgPlease note: code is being uploaded to GitHub progressively; if you find that something from this document is missing from a repository, please check back periodically.Completed work:HyperCash/HCHcdDeveloped lightning transaction fee algorithmRan tests for seamless upgrade planCompleted HAILP public beta deploymentReleased V2.2.0 BetaReleased user guide for HAILP public beta participationHcwalletReleased V2.2.0 BetaOptimised codeHcstakepoolDeveloped HAILP transaction (lightning transaction) verification and voting logichcGUIReleased V2.2.0 Beta for macOSReleased V2.2.0 Beta for WindowsReleased V2.2.0 Beta for LinuxHyperExchange/HXHX coreOptimised Undertaker, allowing users to customise operationsOptimised memo display on get_transactionHX IndicatorFixed bug; path in Chinese used for registering token contract was not supportedHX IDEFixed ‘no response’ bug that occasionally occurs on console when clicking ‘Back’ buttonOngoing work:HyperCash/HCHcdContinue HAILP public beta testOptimise codeHcwalletContinue HAILP public beta testOptimise codehcGUIOptimise codeHcAutonomyPrepare for new proposalHyperExchange/HXHX coreRun integration tests on new feature that allows users to transfer account names to other usersOptimise Undertaker, allowing users to customise unit tests for operationsFix bug; parameters in Chinese not supported in contract callsHX IndicatorAllow users to transfer account names to other usersHX IDEAdjust debugger to adapt the latest version of virtual machineHX ToolsRun tests for off-chain matchmaking engine and fix bugsAdd support for Python on contractWe are grateful for the immense effort made by all contributors. Each contributor and community member is vital to the technical development of the HCASH ecosystem.To stay up to date with information, or to join our community, check out the following channels:Twitter, Facebook, Reddit, English Telegram, Chinese Telegram, Korean Telegram, Korean Announcements, KakaoTalk, Naver Blog

HyperCash

19. 07. 05

How to Participate in HCASH...

Important: The ‘AI Transactions’ feature can only be used on the testnet of the ‘2.2.0 Beta’ version of hcGUI during the public beta, and will be available to use on the mainnet after testing is completed.This guide has been made for users who wish to participate in testing for the HCASH AI Lightning Protocol public beta, using hcGUI. Testing done by members of our community will allow them to be the first to experience new features, and also help the HCASH tech team collect valuable data about the implementation, ensuring its intended operation.The public beta is going to be running on the HCASH testnet. If you do not yet have a testnet wallet, please create one before starting.You can collect testnet tokens from: https://faucet.h.cashYou can download hcGUI from: https://github.com/HcashOrg/hcGUI/releases/RC2.2.0betaPlease note: if this is your first time using the testnet on hcGUI, it may take a while for data to load.If you already have a test net wallet, you can simply log in and make transactions using the Protocol.1. Log in to your testnet wallet on hcGUI.2. Go to the AI Transactions pageSend: users can send testnet tokens here.Receive: users can generate a HC address here (for testnet use only).History: users can review their transaction history here.We are grateful for the immense effort made by all contributors. Each contributor and community member is vital to the technical development of the HCASH ecosystem.To stay up to date with information, or to join our community, check out the following channels:Twitter, Facebook, Reddit, English Telegram, Chinese Telegram, Korean Telegram, Korean Announcements, KakaoTalk, Naver Blog

HyperCash

19. 07. 03

How to Participate in HCASH...

This guide has been made for users who wish to participate in testing for the HCASH AI Lightning Protocol public beta, using the CLI wallet. Testing done by members of our community will allow them to be the first to experience new features, and also help the HCASH tech team collect valuable data about the implementation, ensuring its intended operation.You can download the CLI wallet here.1. Obtaining an address:hcctl — testnet -u admin -P 123 — wallet getnewaddressNote: this address can only be used on the testnet.2. Collect HC tokens at https://faucet.h.cash/requestfaucetCopy and paste your HC testnet address into the box, and click Send.Note: the tokens you receive can only be used on the testnet.3. Sending HC tokens to other addresses:Normal transactions: send 500 HC to another address by using the following command: (you can change the address and amount of tokens)hcctl — testnet -u admin -P 123 — wallet sendtoaddress TsY5aGpApd5snxXm2yVMQ7AsXHzoK2kX1fo 500AI Transactions: send 200 HC to another address by using the following command. (you can change the address and amount of tokens)hcctl — testnet -u admin -P 123 — wallet aisendtoaddress TsY5aGpApd5snxXm2yVMQ7AsXHzoK2kX1fo 2004. Checking your balance:hcctl — testnet -u admin -P 123 — wallet getbalance defaultNote: ‘default’ refers to you account name. In the figture below, ‘aitxconfirmed’ refers to the confirmed transaction on the AI Lightning Protocol.5. Registering to be an AInode by purchasing AI tickets:hcctl — testnet -u admin -P 123 — wallet purchaseaiticket “default” 2000 3 “” 10Note: ‘default’ refers to the account name; ‘2000’ refers to the maximum available fund for AITickes; ‘3’ refers to the minimum block confirmations; “” refers to override the ticket address to which voting rights are given (blank as default); ‘10’ refers to the purchase amount.6. Reviewing AI transaction history in AInode mempool:hcctl -u admin -P 123 — testnet gettxlockpoolinfo

HyperCash

19. 07. 03

HCASH Team to Attend ACISP ...

We are once again excited to announce that HCASH will be attending the Australasian Conference on Information Security and Privacy (ACISP) from July 3 — 5 this year.This is the second year HCASH Chief Scientist, Dr Joseph Liu, will be attending the event, with CEO Adam Geri and COO Andrew Wasylewicz joining him on behalf of the team. our attendance is a result of Dr Joseph and his colleagues’ paper “Lattice RingCT V2.0 with Multiple Input and Multiple Output Wallets” being published at the conference.If you would like to find out more about their paper, you can refer to our previous post here.Dr Joseph will be presenting the first keynote at the event, and will also feature on several sessions, covering topics such as cryptocurrency, attacks on RSA encryption, and post-quantum security.The 24th Australasian Conference on Information Security and Privacy (ACISP) will be held in Christchurch New Zealand on 3–5 July 2019, organized by the University of Canterbury.ACISP has established a key forum for international researchers and industry experts to present and discuss the latest research, trends, breakthroughs, and challenges in the domain of information security, privacy and cybersecurity.You can find more on ACISP 2019 here.You can keep an eye out for live updates about the event, and other news on our social media channels below.Twitter, Facebook, Reddit, English Telegram, Chinese Telegram, Korean Telegram, Korean Announcements, KakaoTalk, Naver Blog

HyperCash

19. 07. 02

Weekly Development Update

21/06/2019–27/06/2019The following is a weekly progress report from the HCASH development team. This report is divided in two parts: completed and ongoing work.Our GitHub code can be found here: www.github.com/HcashOrgPlease note: code is being uploaded to GitHub progressively; if you find that something from this document is missing from a repository, please check back periodically.Completed work:HyperCash/HCHcdCompleted election logic development for AInode ticketsCompleted AInode reward distribution algorithm developmentHcwalletCompleted lightning transaction replay feature developmentCompleted lightning transaction rollback feature developmentCompleted lightning transaction synchronisationhcExplorerCompleted lightning transaction display on explorerCompleted AIDone ticket display and back-end working logic development on explorerHyperExchange/HXHX coreCompleted acceptance tests and released V1.2.21Ran contract vote mining integration testHX IndicatorFixed bug; contract tokens cannot be transferredHX IDEFixed no response bug that occasionally occurs on taskbarHX ToolsUpdated HX DocumentationOngoing work:HyperCash/HCHcdDevelop lightning transaction fee algorithmRun tests for seamless upgrade planHcwalletOptimise codeHcstakepoolDevelop HAILP transaction (lightning transaction) verification and voting logicHcAutonomyPrepare for new proposalHyperExchange/HXHX coreOptimise Undertaker functionsRun unit test on new feature that allows users to transfer account names to other usersOptimise Undertaker, allowing users to customise operationsHX IndicatorAllow users to transfer account names to other usersHX IDEAdjust debugger to adapt the latest version of virtual machineHX ToolsRun tests for off-chain matchmaking engine and fix bugsRun unit test for HX Uniswap dAppWe are grateful for the immense effort made by all contributors. Each contributor and community member is vital to the technical development of the HCASH ecosystem.To stay up to date with information, or to join our community, check out the following channels:Twitter, Facebook, Reddit, English Telegram, Chinese Telegram, Korean Telegram, Korean Announcements, KakaoTalk, Naver Blog

HyperCash

19. 06. 28

HCASH AI Lightning Protocol...

HCASH AI Lightning Protocol has Been Developed — Testing to Commence July 1stOn June 26th, 2019, the HCASH Foundation announced that the development of HCASH AI lightning protocol (HAILP) has been completed, with network testing to commence on July 1st.After nearly one year of development and testing and the team’s continuous efforts, the target to Complete HAIL Protocol Development in Q2 2019, in the roadmap has been successfully reached, with the vision of “a new standard of value” being realised progressively. The launch of HCASH AI lightning protocol continues to not only set the precedent for our community’s expectations, but also fulfils the needs within the industry.The launch of HAILP is a fundamental component in the development of HCASH, realising real-time payments, low-cost transactions, scalability and privacy preservation not only on the HC blockchain, but with the possibility of implementation in other mainnet crypto assets. This opens the market for practical third-party HCASH applications, promoting the process of empowering blockchain within the world’s economy.HAILP adopts the solution of a double-layer network. The first is the PoW+PoS consensus mechanism, which serves as the underlying network, and AInode being the top layer network, based on the HAIL Protocol. AInode functions to enable lightning transactions, private transactions and light node services. Users who stake 1,000 HC can apply to become an AInode, with the ability to participate in community governance, and deal with lightning transactions in return for block rewards and trading fees.It is simple for ordinary users to make lightning transactions, as there is no access threshold, no node construction fees, and no need to pre-deposit crypto assets. HCASH AI lightning Protocol also supports offline transactions, private transactions and on-chain transactions, providing solutions to various technological problems within the blockchain industry, significantly optimising user experience.The launch of HAILP exhibits the achievements of HCASH to the public, with the upcoming network testing providing important reference data for the official launch of HC lightning network. This serves to guarantee its stable and secure operation, and allows users to provide suggestions for its future direction.The HC mainnet will continue to be committed to the research and development of underlying blockchain technology. Its major direction is to realise private transactions and ASIC resistance on the basis of a new ring-signature technology, and to realise decentralised file storage through AInode in HC lightning network. The HCASH team will continue to make upgrades and optimise the mainnet in respect to security, scalability, privacy and user experience, and offer better services to the community, partners and developers.The HCASH team are eager to continue their hard work, and would like to express their sincere gratitude to users all over the world for their continuous support!To stay up to date with information, or to join our community, check out the following channels:Twitter, Facebook, Reddit, English Telegram, Chinese Telegram, Korean Telegram, Korean Announcements, KakaoTalk, Naver Blog

HyperCash

19. 06. 27

Weekly Development Update

14–20 June 2019The following is a weekly progress report from the HCASH development team. This report is divided in two parts: completed and ongoing work.Our GitHub code can be found here: www.github.com/HcashOrgPlease note: code is being uploaded to GitHub progressively; if you find that something from this document is missing from a repository, please check back periodically.Completed work:HyperCash/HCHcdCompleted withdrawal and voting logic development for AInode ticketsCompleted AInode nodepool automatic management logic developmentCompleted AInode getstakeinfo RPC interface developmentHcwalletOptimised codehcExplorerImplemented lightning transactionsHyperExchange/HXHX coreCompleted acceptance tests and released V1.2.21Ran contract vote mining unit testCompleted code development to allow users to transfer account names to other usersHX IndicatorImplemented fault tolerance on Simplified Payment VerificationHX IDEOptimised code for LogHX ToolsCompleted Daemon front-end development for HX Uniswap dAppOngoing work:HyperCash/HCHcdDevelop HAILPDevelop election logic for AInode ticketsDevelop AInode reward distribution algorithmDevelop lightning transaction fee algorithmHcwalletOptimise codeHcstakepoolDevelop HAILP transaction (lightning transaction) verification systemHcAutonomyPrepare for new proposalHyperExchange/HXHX coreOptimise UndertakerRun unit test for account name transfersRun integration test for contract vote miningHX IndicatorFix increasing occupied storage issueAllow users to transfer account names to other usersHX IDEFix no response bug that occasionally occurs on taskbarHX ToolsRun tests for off-chain matchmaking engine and fix bugsUpdate HX DocumentationRun unit test for HX Uniswap dAppWe are grateful for the immense effort made by all contributors. Each contributor and community member is vital to the technical development of the HCASH ecosystem.To stay up to date with information, or to join our community, check out the following channels:Twitter, Facebook, Reddit, English Telegram, Chinese Telegram, Korean Telegram, Korean Announcements, KakaoTalk, Naver Blog

HyperCash

19. 06. 21

Weekly Development Update

7–13 June 2019The following is a weekly progress report from the HCASH development team. This report is divided in two parts: completed and ongoing work.Our GitHub code can be found here: www.github.com/HcashOrgPlease note: code is being uploaded to GitHub progressively; if you find that something from this document is missing from a repository, please check back periodically.Completed work:HyperCash/HCHcdModified getwork logicRan tests for HAILP transaction rollback feature and fixed bugsDeveloped HAILP transaction secondary packaging logicHcwalletDeveloped AInode ticket purchase logicHyperExchange/HXHX coreAdded secure version which generates random number interface to contractBCH original address adaptationRan Undertaker unit testHX IndicatorOptimised K line page displayOptimised trading depth displayHX IDEProvided dependent dynamic libraries for debugger environmentOptimised detection processing for IDE lunch and shutdownHX ToolsAdded HX token pageOngoing work:HyperCash/HCHcdDevelop HAILPDevelop election, withdrawal and voting logic for AInode ticketsDevelop AInode nodepool automatic management logicDevelop AIDode reward distribution algorithmHcwalletOptimise codeHcstakepoolDevelop HAILP transaction (lightning transaction) verification systemhcExplorerAdd lightning transaction featureHcAutonomyPrepare for new proposalHyperExchange/HXHX coreRun unit test for secure version on contract which generates random number interfaceRun integration test for BCH original address adaptionAllow users to transfer account names to other usersRun contract vote mining unit testHX IndicatorImplement fault tolerance on Simplified Payment VerificationAllow users to transfer account names to other usersHX IDEOptimise code for debuggerHX ToolsRun tests for off-chain matchmaking engine and fix bugsDevelop HX Uniswap dApp front-endUpgrade HX DocumentationWe are grateful for the immense effort made by all contributors. Each contributor and community member is vital to the technical development of the HCASH ecosystem.To stay up to date with information, or to join our community, check out the following channels:Twitter, Facebook, Reddit, English Telegram, Chinese Telegram, Korean Telegram, Korean Announcements, KakaoTalk, Naver Blog

HyperCash

19. 06. 14

Weekly Development Update

31 May — 6 June 2019The following is a weekly progress report from the HCASH development team. This report is divided in two parts: completed and ongoing work.Our GitHub code can be found here: www.github.com/HcashOrgPlease note: code is being uploaded to GitHub progressively; if you find that something from this document is missing from a repository, please check back periodically.Completed work:HyperCash/HCHcdCompleted HAILP transaction rollback developmentCompleted verification and validation development for instant transaction returning to mempoolHcwalletCompleted HAILP transaction database storage developmentHyperExchange/HXHX coreFixed bug that occurs when estimating block heightAdapted contract voting interface at contract interaction layerHX IndicatorAllowed users to log in again when the login interface does not proceed for a long timeUnchecked wallet auto-lock option, users must manually select option to auto-lock walletFixed a display bugRemoved code that is no longer functioningHX IDEFixed data loss bug that occurs on concurrent communication between IDE and debuggerHX ToolsCompleted Uniswap contract development for HXOngoing work:HyperCash/HCHcdDevelop HAILPModify getwork logicRun tests for HAILP transaction rollback feature and fix bugsDevelop HAILP transaction secondary packaging logicHcwalletOptimise codeHcstakepoolDevelop HAILP transaction (lightning transaction) verification systemhcExplorerAdd lightning transaction featureHcAutonomyPrepare for new proposalHyperExchange/HXHX coreRun Undertaker unit testAllow users to transfer account names to other usersRun contract vote mining unit testHX IndicatorImplement fault tolerance on Simplified Payment VerificationAllow users to transfer account names to other usersHX IDEProvide dependent dynamic libraries for debuggers environmentOptimise detection processing for IDE lunch and shutdownHX ToolsRun tests for off-chain matchmaking engine and fix bugsAdd HX token pageWe are grateful for the immense effort made by all contributors. Each contributor and community member is vital to the technical development of the HCASH ecosystem.To stay up to date with information, or to join our community, check out the following channels:Twitter, Facebook, Reddit, English Telegram, Chinese Telegram, Korean Telegram, Korean Announcements, KakaoTalk, Naver Blog

HyperCash

19. 06. 07

Weekly Development Update

17–23 May 2019The following is a weekly progress report from the HCASH development team. This report is divided in two parts: completed and ongoing work.Our GitHub code can be found here: www.github.com/HcashOrgPlease note: code is being uploaded to GitHub progressively; if you find that something from this document is missing from a repository, please check back periodically.Completed work:HyperCash/HCHcdDevelop transaction synchronisation verification logicOptimised txlockpool processing logic, including double-spend and block height updateDeveloped InforpcHcwalletOptimised codeHcwikiFixed several bugsHyperExchange/HXHX coreReleased V1.2.20Completed Undertaker developmentHX IndicatorFixed crash issue occurring on macOS systemsAdded block height displayLimited the number of operations included in a redeemed asset transactionHX IDECompleted IDE User GuideHX ToolsIntegrated dApp SDK with AnyBit APIImplemented token contact on hxscannerOngoing work:HyperCash/HCHcdDevelop HAILPModify getwork logicDevelop block rollback logicHcwalletContinue to optimise codeHcstakepoolDevelop HAILP transaction (lightning transaction) verification systemhcExplorerAdd lightning transaction featureHcAutonomyPrepare for new proposalHyperExchange/HXHX coreRun Undertaker unit testAllow users to transfer account names to other usersAdapt contract voting interface at contract interaction layerHX IndicatorImplement fault tolerance on Simplified Payment VerificationHX IDEOptimise concurrent communication between IDE and debuggerHX ToolsRun tests for off-chain matchmaking engine and fix bugsDevelop Uniswap aApp for HXWe are grateful for the immense effort made by all contributors. Each contributor and community member is vital to the technical development of the HCASH ecosystem.To stay up to date with information, or to join our community, check out the following channels:Twitter, Facebook, Reddit, English Telegram, Chinese Telegram, Korean Telegram, Korean Announcements, KakaoTalk, Naver Blog

HyperCash

19. 05. 31

Weekly Development Update

17–23 May 2019The following is a weekly progress report from the HCASH development team. This report is divided in two parts: completed and ongoing work.Our GitHub code can be found here: www.github.com/HcashOrgPlease note: code is being uploaded to GitHub progressively; if you find that something from this document is missing from a repository, please check back periodically.Completed work:HyperCash/HCHcdAdded locking txpool featureAdded management logic for locking txpool featureTechnical supportAssisted with block production issues on AntpoolHyperExchange/HXHX coreSupported lockbalance on contract vote mining and related upgradeRan tests after data transplantationRan acceptance test on V1.2.20HX IndicatorAdded BCH assetFixed bug that occurs when opening Exchange pageHX IDEOptimised dynamic library dependency issues on debugger under macOS systemsTested and located abnormal instruction receiving issue on debugger for macOS systemsHX ToolsRan integration test on new version of HX websiteOngoing work:HyperCash/HCHcdDevelop HAILPDevelop transaction synchronisation verification logicModify getwork logicHcwalletOptimise codeHcstakepoolDevelop HAILP transaction (lightning transaction) verification systemDevelop voting logic for lightning transactionhcExplorerAdd lightning transaction featureHcAutonomyPrepare for new proposalHyperExchange/HXHX coreDevelop Undertaker featureAllow user to transfer account name to other usersHX IndicatorImplement fault tolerance on Simplified Payment VerificationRun integration tests on Simplified Payment VerificationHX IDEPrepare IDE User GuideHX ToolsIntegrate dApp SDK with AnyBit APIRun tests for off-chain matchmaking engine and fix bugsDevelop Uniswap aApp for HXRun acceptance tests on new version of HX websiteWe are grateful for the immense effort made by all contributors. Each contributor and community member is vital to the technical development of the HCASH ecosystem.To stay up to date with information, or to join our community, check out the following channels:Twitter, Facebook, Reddit, English Telegram, Chinese Telegram, Korean Telegram, Korean Announcements, KakaoTalk, Naver Blog

HyperCash

19. 05. 24

HCASH Chief Scientist Dr. J...

HCASH Chief Scientist, Dr Joseph Liu and his and his colleagues’ paper “Lattice RingCT V2.0 with Multiple Input and Multiple Output Wallets” is to be published by the Australasian Conference on Information Security and Privacy (ACISP) this July.This paper is written by Wilson Alberto Torres, Veronika Kuchta, Ron Steinfeld, Amin Sakzad, Joseph K. Liu, and Jacob Cheng, which presents the Lattice-based Ring Confidential Transactions “Lattice RingCT v2.0” protocol. Unlike the previous Lattice RingCT v1.0 (LRCT v1.0) protocol, which was published last year by the International Association for Cryptologic Research, the new protocol supports Multiple-Input and Multiple-Output (MIMO) wallets in transactions, and is a fully functional protocol construction for cryptocurrency applications such as HCASH.Since the MIMO cryptocurrency setting introduces new balance security requirements (and in particular, security against out-of-range amount attacks), this paper gives a refined balance security model to capture such attacks, as well as a refined anonymity model to capture amount privacy attacks. LRCT v2.0 extends a previously proposed ring signature scheme in the LRCT v1.0 protocol, to support the MIMO requirements while preserving the post-quantum security guarantees, and uses a lattice-based zero-knowledge range proof to achieve security against out-of-range attacks.The HyperCash development team has completed and released code for the implementation of Post-Quantum Linkable Ring Signatures in HC this February. This algorithm is based on a previous publication “Post-Quantum One-Time Linkable Ring Signature and Application to Ring Confidential Transactions in Blockchain” (Lattice RingCT v1.0), which was also written by Dr. Joseph Liu and his colleagues. Now with the Lattice RingCT v2.0 paper being published, the HCASH development team will improve their RingCT v2.0 Code in the future, to provide users with more Ring Signature, Blockchain Security, and Privacy Protection technologies.Please refer to https://medium.com/@media_30378/ring-signatures-blockchain-security-and-privacy-protection-technologies-50c7b90db30e for more information about Ring Signatures, Blockchain Security, and Privacy Protection.The first version, Post-Quantum One-Time Linkable Ring Signature and Application to Ring Confidential Transactions in Blockchain (Lattice RingCT v1.0) can be found here: https://eprint.iacr.org/2018/379.pdfTo stay up to date with information, or to join our community, check out the following channels:Twitter, Facebook, Reddit, English Telegram, Chinese Telegram, Korean Telegram, Korean Announcements, KakaoTalk, Naver Blog

HyperCash

19. 05. 17

Weekly Development Update

10–16 May 2019The following is a weekly progress report from the HCASH development team. This report is divided in two parts: completed and ongoing work.Our GitHub code can be found here: www.github.com/HcashOrgPlease note: code is being uploaded to GitHub progressively; if you find that something from this document is missing from a repository, please check back periodically.Completed work:HyperCash/HCHcdCompleted HAILP module allocationDesigned trading type lock-up architecturehcGUIFixed project dependent libraryReleased V2.1.10 for WindowsReleased V2.1.10 for macOS systemsReleased V2.1.10 for DebianHyperExchange/HXHX coreRun tests on BCH unitTransplanted trading database to leveldb to reduce storage occupied by hx_nodeHX IndicatorDeveloped Simplified Payment VerificationModified trading depth display on K line pageHX IDEImplemented debugging function adaptation to debugger on IDE under macOS systemsCompiled debugger on macOS systemsHX ToolsUpgraded to new version of HX websiteDeveloped contract debugger on macOS systemsDeveloped off-chain matchmaking engine for on-chain tradingOngoing work:HyperCash/HCHcdDevelop HAILP ProtocolTechnical supportContinue to assist with block production issues on AntpoolHcAutonomyPrepare for new proposalHyperExchange/HXHX coreRun test after data transplantationRun integration tests on BCH unitHX IndicatorRun tests on Simplified Payment Verification unitHX IDEOptimise dynamic library dependency issues on debugger under macOS systemsTest and locate abnormal instruction receiving issue on debugger for macOS systemsHX ToolsIntegrate dApp SDK with AnyBit APIRun tests for off-chain matchmaking engine and fix bugsRun tests for new version of HX website and fix bugs (Progress: 80% on bug fixing)We are grateful for the immense effort made by all contributors. Each contributor and community member is vital to the technical development of the HCASH ecosystem.To stay up to date with information, or to join our community, check out the following channels:Twitter, Facebook, Reddit, English Telegram, Chinese Telegram, Korean Telegram, Korean Announcements, KakaoTalk, Naver Blog

HyperCash

19. 05. 17

Weekly Development Update

03–09 May 2019The following is a weekly progress report from the HCASH development team. This report is divided in two parts: completed and ongoing work.Our GitHub code can be found here: www.github.com/HcashOrgPlease note: code is being uploaded to GitHub progressively; if you find that something from this document is missing from a repository, please check back periodically.Completed work:HyperCash/HCHcdOptimised codeRan tests for Linkable RingCT codehcGUIDeveloped and ran tests for debug window APIHcOMNIUpgraded project dependent libraryHyperExchange/HXHX coreRan tests on voting mechanism for community autonomyDeveloped BCH cross-chain codeHX IndicatorUpgraded K line featured market information to a separate pageHX IDEUpgraded debugger on macOS systemsFixed startup directory failure on HX walletHX ToolsAdded signature feature for off-chain matchmaking to HX plug-in walletAdded pending order processing feature to off-chain matchmaking on HX dApp demoOngoing work:HyperCash/HCHcdDevelop HAILP ProtocolhcGUIFix project dependent libraryRelease V2.1.10 on WindowsRelease V2.1.10 on macOS systemsTechnical supportContinue to assist with block production issues on AntpoolHcAutonomyPrepare for new proposalHyperExchange/HXHX coreRun tests on BCH unitHX IndicatorDevelop Simplified Payment VerificationModify trading depth display on K line pageHX IDECompile debugger on macOS systemsHX ToolsRun tests on HDEX HTML5 and fix bugsDevelop off-chain matchmaking engine for on-chain tradingUpgrade to new version of HX website (Progress: 100% on Home page, 100% on HX ecosystem construction, 100% on HX Info and 80% on HX Roadmap)We are grateful for the immense effort made by all contributors. Each contributor and community member is vital to the technical development of the HCASH ecosystem.To stay up to date with information, or to join our community, check out the following channels:Twitter, Facebook, Reddit, English Telegram, Chinese Telegram, Korean Telegram, Korean Announcements, KakaoTalk, Naver Blog

HyperCash

19. 05. 10

Weekly Development Update

26 — 02 May 2019The following is a weekly progress report from the HCASH development team. This report is divided in two parts: completed and ongoing work.Our GitHub code can be found here: www.github.com/HcashOrgPlease note: code is being uploaded to GitHub progressively; if you find that something from this document is missing from a repository, please check back periodically.Completed work:HyperCash/HCHcdOptimised codeCompleted HAILP architectureHcwalletOptimised codehcGUIAdded debug windowTechnical supportProvided technical support to CoinnestHyperExchange/HXHX coreBCH info collectionFixed several bugsHX IndicatorAdded new voting types for CitizensHX IDEOptimised color display of code under debug modeOptimised menu bar on home screenHX ToolsModified blockchain interactive interface and added corresponding interface on HDEXOngoing work:HyperCash/HCHcdDevelop HAILP ProtocolRun tests for Linkable RingCT codehcGUIDevelop and run tests for debug window APITechnical supportContinue to assist with block production issues on AntpoolHcOMNIUpgrade project dependent libraryHcAutonomyPrepare for new proposalHyperExchange/HXHX coreRun tests on voting mechanism for community autonomyDeveloped BCH cross-chain codeHX IndicatorUpgrad K line featured market information to a separate pageHX IDECompile debugger on macOS systemsHX ToolsRun tests on HDEX HTML5 and fix bugsDevelop off-chain matchmaking engine for on-chain tradingUpgrade to new version of HX website (Rate of progress: 100% on Home page, 90% on HX ecosystem construction, 80% on HX Info and 50% on HX Roadmap)We are grateful for the immense effort made by all contributors. Each contributor and community member is vital to the technical development of the HCASH ecosystem.To stay up to date with information, or to join our community, check out the following channels:Twitter, Facebook, Reddit, English Telegram, Chinese Telegram, Korean Telegram, Korean Announcements, KakaoTalk, Naver Blog

HyperCash

19. 05. 03

Weekly Development Update

19–25 April 2019The following is a weekly progress report from the HCASH development team. This report is divided in two parts: completed and ongoing work.Our GitHub code can be found here: www.github.com/HcashOrgPlease note: code is being uploaded to GitHub progressively; if you find that something from this document is missing from a repository, please check back periodically.Completed work:HyperCash/HCHcdOptimised codeHcwalletCompleted development on block validation for ASIC resistant mining algorithmhcExplorerCompleted automatic routing feature testsLaunched automatic routing featureCompleted tests on hcData module and optimised codeHyperExchange/HXHX coreReleased V1.2.18 and V1.2.19Fixed several bugsHX IndicatorFixed bug that occurs when Senators update private key statusHX IDEOptimised comment line identification under debugging statusConducted breakpoint adjustmentCompiler compiled several dependent libraries on macOS systemsHX ToolsAdded hx.js, hxPay.js and plug-in wallet to develop signature API for off-chain matchmakingOngoing work:HyperCash/HCHcdDevelop HAILP ProtocolRun tests for Linkable RingCT codehcGUIAdd debug windowTechnical supportAssisted with block production issues on AntpoolHyperExchange/HXHX coreRun tests on voting mechanism for community autonomyConduct research for BCH integrationHX IndicatorUpgrad K line featured market information to a separate pageAdd new voting types for CitizensHX IDECompile debugger on macOS systemsHX ToolsRun tests on HDEX HTML5 and fix bugsDevelop off-chain matchmaking engine for on-chain tradingUpgrade to new version of HX website (Rate of progress: 50% on Home page, 70% on HX ecosystem construction, 20% on HX Info)We are grateful for the immense effort made by all contributors. Each contributor and community member is vital to the technical development of the HCASH ecosystem.To stay up to date with information, or to join our community, check out the following channels:Twitter, Facebook, Reddit, English Telegram, Chinese Telegram, Korean Telegram, Korean Announcements, KakaoTalk, Naver Blog

HyperCash

19. 04. 26

Weekly Development Update

12–18 April 2019The following is a weekly progress report from the HCASH development team. This report is divided in two parts: completed and ongoing work.Our GitHub code can be found here: www.github.com/HcashOrgPlease note: code is being uploaded to GitHub progressively; if you find that something from this document is missing from a repository, please check back periodically.Completed work:HyperCash/HCHcdOptimised codehcExplorerAdded monitoring systemRevised PQ data warehousing mechanismHcOMNIImplemented multi-signature feature to Omni tokensHcAutonomyFinished proposal votingHyperExchange/HXHX coreRan tests for V1.2.18Removed redundant order_history_dbOptimised pay_miner function, increasing replay performance by 10%HX IndicatorFixed crash bug that occurs when collecting rewardsRenamed “pledge mining” to “vote mining” on V1.2.18HX IDEFixed c# contract compile failure issueFixed keyboard input issues on WindowsHX ToolsPublished open source HX block scanning programOngoing work:HyperCash/HCHcdDevelop HAILP ProtocolRun tests for Linkable RingCT codeHcwalletDevelopment on block validation for ASIC resistant mining algorithmhcGUIAdd debug windowhcExplorerAdd automatic routing feature to ensure 99.9% availabilityHyperExchange/HXHX coreFix bugsCitizens are to be able to propose new types of votingFurther optimise data storage, launch speed and replay speedHX IndicatorAdd new voting types for CitizensHX IDECompile debugger on macOS systemsHX ToolsHX Web Wallet is now under review on Chrome Web Store and is expected to be launched within the next weekRun tests on HDEX HTML5 and fix bugsDevelop off-chain matchmaking engine for on-chain tradingWe are grateful for the immense effort made by all contributors. Each contributor and community member is vital to the technical development of the HCASH ecosystem.To stay up to date with information, or to join our community, check out the following channels:Twitter, Facebook, Reddit, English Telegram, Chinese Telegram, Korean Telegram, Korean Announcements, KakaoTalk, Naver Blog

HyperCash

19. 04. 19

How to Vote Using Command L...

In this post are instructions on how to vote for community members using the command line wallet.Build infrastructure1. Update to the latest wallet version: https://github.com/HcashOrg/hcwallet/releases/tag/Release2.1.02. Download hcAutonomyvoter: https://github.com/HcashOrg/hcAutonomy/releases/tag/v1.0.03. Edit hcAutonomyvoter.conf and move file to:Linux: ~/.hcAutonomyvoterWindows: %LOCALAPPDATA%\HcAutonomyvoterMac: ~/Library/Application Support/HcAutonomyvoterMainnet: hcAutonomywww=https://autonomy.h.cash/apiTestnet: hcAutonomywww=https://testnet-autonomy.h.cash/apiNote: Recommended hcAutonomyvoter.con configuration is as follows:4. Edit hcd configuration file:a. Input “%localappdata%” on command lineb. Open hcd folder (if no such folder, please launch hcd fisrt, folder will be automatically created)c. Open hcd.conf to find “addrindex=1” and “txindex=1” (remove the “:”)5. Launch hcd through the following command:hcd — testnet -u admin -P 1236. Launch hcwallet:hcwallet — testnet -u admin -P 123 — hcusername admin — walletpass 123 — hcpassword 123Voting for Proposal1. Get proposal information through the following command:hcAutonomyvoter inventoryOutput:Meaning that this user has 9 valid tickets to vote for this proposal2. Vote through the following command:hcAutonomyvoter vote 8bdebbc55ae74066cc57c76bc574fd1517111e56b3d1295bde5ba3b0bd7c3f67 yesNote: yes for approval and no for objectionOutput:Enter the private passphrase and wait for voting to be confirmed. Normally it takes less than 5 minutes.3. Get voting status through the following command:hcAutonomyvoter tally 8bdebbc55ae74066cc57c76bc574fd1517111e56b3d1295bde5ba3b0bd7c3f67Output:Happy voting!

HyperCash

19. 04. 12

Hcash weekly update

05 — 11 April 2019The following is a weekly progress report from the HCASH development team. This report is divided in two parts: completed and ongoing work.Our GitHub code can be found here: www.github.com/HcashOrgPlease note: code is being uploaded to GitHub progressively; if you find that something from this document is missing from a repository, please check back periodically.Completed work:HyperCash/HCHcdOptimised codeDeveloped ASIC-resistant mining algorithmHcwalletOptimised codehcExplorerFixed ‘Rich List’ false data issue caused by inaccurate data warehouseHcOMNICompleted proposal voting instruction for hcGUI usersCompleted proposal voting instruction for CLI usersHcAutonomyRevised proposalHyperExchange/HXHX coreBTM cross-chain integration tests were delayed by unforeseen circumstancesAdded re-synchronisation feature when data fails to loadOptimised hx_node storage occupation and synchronisation speedHX IndicatorAdded “cancel” button to withdrawal featureAdded ‘cancelled withdrawal history’ to transaction historyHX IDERemoved several logs on macOS systemsOptimised debugging moduleHX ToolsFixed issue where font is unable to be downloaded on HDEX HTML5Fixed style error after packing on HDEX HTML5Ongoing work:HyperCash/HCHcdDevelop HAILP ProtocolRun tests for Linkable RingCT codeHcwalletDevelopment on block validation for ASIC resistant mining algorithmhcGUIAdd debug windowhcExplorerAdd monitoring systemHcAutonomyReview code for proposal votingHyperExchange/HXHX coreOptimise off-chain matchmaking scheme for on-chain tradingFurther optimise data storage, launch speed and replay speedRun test for V1.2.18HX IndicatorOptimise trading history query featureOptimise trading storage methodFix crash bug that occurs when collecting rewardsHX IDECompile debugger on macOS systemsTroubleshoot keyboard input issues on WindowsHX ToolsRun tests on HDEX HTML5 and fix bugsDevelop off-chain matchmaking engine for on-chain tradingWe are grateful for the immense effort made by all contributors. Each contributor and community member is vital to the technical development of the HCASH ecosystem.To stay up to date with information, or to join our community, check out the following channels:Twitter, Facebook, Reddit, English Telegram, Chinese Telegram, Korean Telegram, Korean Announcements, KakaoTalk, Naver Blog

HyperCash

19. 04. 12

How to Vote on hcGUI

The proposal to increase the speed of the HCASH blockchain has been put forth, and is now open to voting.There are a large number of active tickets ready to vote, however, compared to the number of tickets, only about 1% have actually made a vote. The details regarding voting for the current proposal are as follows:Total valid tickets: 30,365Voted tickets: 306Voting participation percentage: ~1%Affirmative votes: 306Negative votes: 0The proposal can only be approved if the following requirements are met:a. votes that participate in proposal voting must be more than or equal to 75% of the total amount of live tickets.b. votes that approve the proposal must be more than or equal to 75% of the votes that participate in voting for this proposal.To assist users who have not voted, we have created the following instructions.Important: If the hcGUI wallet is “Rescanning”, please wait for it to complete before doing anything.1. Log in to the hcGUI wallet and open the “Governance” page.Click the “Under Vote” button to review and vote for any ongoing proposals. Only proposals in this category are open for voting.Note: Clicking the “Create a Proposal” button will take you to https://autonomy.h.cash where users can create new and review previous proposals.2. Review proposalsClicking on any of these proposals will take you to the voting page. You can view all details of the proposal by clicking the link.Note: Proposals in the “Under Discussion” category are not open for voting. Users can only review the details and status of these proposals.3. If you have not created a HCASH Pool account, please visit https://pool.h.cash. and do so.Once you have an account, you can copy the API Key found under “Settings”, paste it into hcGUI and click “add”.If you don’t have any valid tickets in your wallet, you will need to purchase at least one before you can vote. Click “Purchase Tickets” and you will be redirected to “Tickets” page.Immature tickets need 512 block confirmations (approximately 21.33 hours) to become mature tickets. Please purchase tickets as least 24 hours prior to any proposal voting period ends if you would like to vote.If you already have valid tickets in your wallet, click “YES” or “NO” to vote.Congratulations! You have now cast a vote.Your voting preference will be displayed after you vote.We are grateful for the immense effort made by all contributors. Each contributor and community member is vital to the technical development of the HCASH ecosystem.To stay up to date with information, or to join our community, check out the following channels:Twitter, Facebook, Reddit, English Telegram, Chinese Telegram, Korean Telegram, Korean Announcements, KakaoTalk, Naver Blog

HyperCash

19. 04. 11

Hcash weekly update

29 March — 04 April 2019The following is a weekly progress report from the HCASH development team. This report is divided in two parts: completed and ongoing work.Our GitHub code can be found here: www.github.com/HcashOrgPlease note: code is being uploaded to GitHub progressively; if you find that something from this document is missing from a repository, please check back periodically.Completed work:HyperCash/HCHcdOptimised codeHcwalletOptimised codeTechnical supportAssisted HyperPay wallet to integrate HcOMNI protocolHcOMNIOptimised codeFixed omni_listtransaction featureHyperExchange/HXHX coreOptimised payback_object storageHX IndicatorFixed K line display bug on HDEXHX IDECompiled and ran tests on debugger on Linux systemsHX ToolsAdded compatibility between web wallet and Indicator private key filesAdded HX block scanning toolAdjusted asset page display on HDEX HTML5Ongoing work:HyperCash/HCHcdDevelop ASIC-resistant mining algorithmRun tests for Linkable RingCT codeHcwalletDevelopment on block validation on ASIC resistant mining algorithmTechnical supportPrepare for HcOmni token launch on exchangesHcOMNIPrepare for CNYT issuingHcAutonomyReview code for proposal votingHyperExchange/HXHX coreRun BTM cross-chain integration testingAdd re-synchronisation feature when data fails to loadOptimise off-chain matchmaking scheme for on-chain tradingHX IndicatorOptimise trading history query featureOptimise trading storage methodAdd “cancel” button to withdrawal featureHX IDECompile debugger on macOS systemsHX ToolsRun tests on HDEX HTML5 and fix bugsDevelop off-chain matchmaking engine for on-chain tradingWe are grateful for the immense effort made by all contributors. Each contributor and community member is vital to the technical development of the HCASH ecosystem.To stay up to date with information, or to join our community, check out the following channels:Twitter, Facebook, Reddit, English Telegram, Chinese Telegram, Korean Telegram, Korean Announcements, KakaoTalk, Naver Blog

HyperCash

19. 04. 05

Weekly Development Update

22 — 28 March 2019The following is a weekly progress report from the HCASH development team. This report is divided in two parts: completed and ongoing work.Our GitHub code can be found here: www.github.com/HcashOrgPlease note: code is being uploaded to GitHub progressively; if you find that something from this document is missing from a repository, please check back periodically.Completed work:HyperCash/HCHcdOptimised codeHcwalletOptimised codehcGUIFixed block non-synchronisation bug that appears when hcGUI has not been started for a long timehcExplorerAdded hash rate query pageHcOMNICompleted technical support for YAX token issuingHcAutonomyCompleted mainnet parameter adjustment proposalHyperExchange/HXHX coreAllowed program to launch in non-block replay mode when hx-node is abortedDeveloped BTM middleware codeDeveloped BTM cross-chain codeHX IndicatorRun tests for K line featureHX IDEOptimised logsCompile and run tests under virtual machine IDE on macOS systemsHX ToolsFixed display bug that appears on HDEX user balance pageAdjusted page display on HDEX HTML5 assets pageOngoing work:HyperCash/HCHcdDevelop ASIC-resistant mining algorithmConduct tests for Linkable RingCT codeHcwalletDevelopment on block validation on ASIC resistant mining algorithmHcOMNIPrepare for CNYT issuingHcAutonomyPrepare for new proposal draftHyperExchange/HXHX coreRun BTM cross-chain integration testingOptimise launch commandOptimise off-chain matchmaking scheme for on-chain tradingHX IndicatorOptimise trading history query featureOptimise trading storage methodHX IDECompile debugger on macOS systemsHX ToolsRun tests on HDEX HTML5Run tests on back-end service and fix bugsAdd compatibility to Indicator private key filesWe are grateful for the immense effort made by all contributors. Each contributor and community member is vital to the technical development of the HCASH ecosystem.To stay up to date with information, or to join our community, check out the following channels:Twitter, Facebook, Reddit, English Telegram, Chinese Telegram, Korean Telegram, Korean Announcements, KakaoTalk, Naver Blog

HyperCash

19. 03. 29

New Proposal on HC Autonomy...

New Proposal on HC Autonomy — Significant Improvement in Mainnet PerformanceTo further develop HyperCash (HC) mainnet, the development team has proposed an upgrade that will improve both performance and TPS. This proposal has been published on HC Autonomy.This proposal has been posted for community review, and voting will be open from 6:00PM on the 8th of April until 6:00PM on the 16th of April 2019 (GMT+8).Proposal summaryThe purpose of this proposal is to significantly improve the performance of the HyperCash mainnet by optimising its algorithm.Proposal backgroundThe HyperCash main net has been running stably since its launch. With the implementation of the HC Omni Protocol and other application protocols, HyperCash has gradually improved the performance of its mainnet and optimised its mining algorithms. Likewise, it can be expected that the performance of the HC main net will improve significantly after this proposed upgrade.After a period of testing, the HCASH development team has managed to optimise the HC mining algorithm, increasing its TPS and block speed. The code is now ready to be released.The upgrade will also benefit the development of HCASH AI Lightning Protocol (HAIL Protocol), which has been scheduled to complete development this year, as previously stated in the HCASH Yellow Paper and the roadmap.Technical detailsThe TPS which HC will be able to achieve will increase from 333.3333 to 1,000 transactions per second after the upgrade — a total increase of 200%!Block time will be more than halved, reaching 60 seconds (down from 150).The block reward reduction algorithm will be also optimised. Block rewards will continue to be reduced every 12,288 blocks, the reduction function however, will be adjusted from 999/1,000 + arithmetic progression coefficient to 998/1,000 + arithmetic progression coefficient.How to votePlease visit the Autonomy proposal page for information and voting.The proposal will be released on HC Autonomy for the community to review from now until 6:00PM on the 8th of April (GMT+8).The community can vote for the proposal from 6:00PM on the 8th of April until 6:00PM on the 16th of April 2019 (GMT+8).Note: the proposal can only be approved if the following requirements are met:a. votes that participate in proposal voting must be more than or equal to 75% of the total amount of live tickets.b. votes that approve the proposal must be more than or equal to 75% of the votes that participate in voting for this proposal.ProposerHyperCash teamTo stay up to date with information, or to join our community, check out the following channels:Twitter, Facebook, Reddit, English Telegram, Chinese Telegram, Korean Telegram, Korean Announcements, KakaoTalk, Naver Blog

HyperCash

19. 03. 29

Weekly Development Update

15–21 March 2019The following is a weekly progress report from the HCASH development team. This report is divided in two parts: completed and ongoing work.Our GitHub code can be found here: www.github.com/HcashOrgPlease note: code is being uploaded to GitHub progressively; if you find that something from this document is missing from a repository, please check back periodically.Completed workHyperCash/HCHcdCompleted development for block speed increaseOptimised block production algorithmAdded Best Hash featureOptimised codeHcwalletOptimised codeHyperExchange/HXHX coreModified storage format of native contractAdded off-chain matchmaking scheme for on-chain tradingHX IndicatorIncreased startup speed for some casesOptimised block height displayHX IDEAdded support for data transmission between IDE and debugger via network interfaceFixed lag bugs under debugging status on IDEFixed crash bug that occurred when shutting down debuggerHX ToolsFixed bugs on HX Decentralised Exchange (HDEX) HTML5 K lineAdjusted HDEX HTML5 home page and Markets page displayImplemented user configurationOngoing work:HyperCash/HCHcdDevelop ASIC-resistant mining algorithmConduct tests for Linkable RingCT codeHcwalletDevelopment on block validation on ASIC resistant mining algorithmhcGUIFix block non-synchronisation bug that appears when hcGUI has not been started for a long timeHcOMNIPrepare for CNYT issuingHcAutonomyPrepare for mainnet parameter adjustment proposalHyperExchange/HXHX coreDevelop BTM cross-chain codeAllow programme to launch in non-block replay mode when hx-node is abortedHX IndicatorRun tests for K line featureOptimise trading history query featureOptimise trading storage methodHX IDECompile debugger on macOS systemsHX ToolsRun tests on HDEX HTML5Run tests on back-end service and fix bugsAdd compatibility to Indicator private key filesWe are grateful for the immense effort made by all contributors. Each contributor and community member is vital to the technical development of the HCASH ecosystem.To stay up to date with information, or to join our community, check out the following channels:Twitter, Facebook, Reddit, English Telegram, Chinese Telegram, Korean Telegram, Korean Announcements, KakaoTalk, Naver Blog

HyperCash

19. 03. 22

Weekly Development Update

08–14 March 2019The following is a weekly progress report from the HCASH development team. This report is divided in two parts: completed and ongoing work.Our GitHub code can be found here: www.github.com/HcashOrgPlease note: code is being uploaded to GitHub progressively; if you find that something from this document is missing from a repository, please check back periodically.Completed work:HyperCash/HCHcdOptimised codeHcwalletOptimised codeTechnical supportConducted DApp researchHcAutonomyDrafted a new proposalHyperExchange/HXHX coreOptimised default log print informationFixed the bug that appears on Linux systems; starting after the software shuts down normally will trigger blockchain replaySolved core dump problem that occasionally occurs when Windows restartsIncreased token contract performanceHX IndicatorAdded K line featureFixed Config filesHX IDERemoved old code from console commandModified debugging status enumeration, centrally forwarding debug control commandsHX ToolsAdded balance query feature to HX Decentralised ExchangeAdded personal settings to HX Decentralised ExchangeAdded announcement query feature to HX Decentralised ExchangeOngoing work:HyperCash/HCHcdAdjust and develop mainnet parametersDevelop ASIC-resistant mining algorithmConduct tests for Linkable RingCT codeHcwalletDevelopment on block validation on ASIC resistant mining algorithmHcOMNIPrepare for CNYT issuingHyperExchange/HXHX coreModify the storage format of native contractDevelop BTM cross-chain codeFix several new bugsHX IndicatorRun tests for K line featureOptimise trading history query featureOptimise trading storage methodHX IDERun IDE and debugger integration test with RPC interfaceCompile debugger on macOS systemsHX ToolsDesign offline-chain matchmaking trade schemeAdd user asset deposit and withdrawal history query feature and integrate HX JS pluginIntegrate Announcement page with back-endIntegrate Markets page with back-endWe are grateful for the immense effort made by all contributors. Each contributor and community member is vital to the technical development of the HCASH ecosystem.To stay up to date with information, or to join our community, check out the following channels:Twitter, Facebook, Reddit, English Telegram, Chinese Telegram, Korean Telegram, Korean Announcements, KakaoTalk, Naver Blog

HyperCash

19. 03. 15

Weekly Development Update

08–14 March 2019The following is a weekly progress report from the HCASH development team. This report is divided in two parts: completed and ongoing work.Our GitHub code can be found here: www.github.com/HcashOrgPlease note: code is being uploaded to GitHub progressively; if you find that something from this document is missing from a repository, please check back periodically.Completed work:HyperCash/HCHcdOptimised codeHcwalletOptimised codeTechnical supportConducted DApp researchHcAutonomyDrafted a new proposalHyperExchange/HXHX coreOptimised default log print informationFixed the bug that appears on Linux systems; starting after the software shuts down normally will trigger blockchain replaySolved core dump problem that occasionally occurs when Windows restartsIncreased token contract performanceHX IndicatorAdded K line featureFixed Config filesHX IDERemoved old code from console commandModified debugging status enumeration, centrally forwarding debug control commandsHX ToolsAdded balance query feature to HX Decentralised ExchangeAdded personal settings to HX Decentralised ExchangeAdded announcement query feature to HX Decentralised ExchangeOngoing work:HyperCash/HCHcdAdjust and develop mainnet parametersDevelop ASIC-resistant mining algorithmConduct tests for Linkable RingCT codeHcwalletDevelopment on block validation on ASIC resistant mining algorithmHcOMNIPrepare for CNYT issuingHyperExchange/HXHX coreModify the storage format of native contractDevelop BTM cross-chain codeFix several new bugsHX IndicatorRun tests for K line featureOptimise trading history query featureOptimise trading storage methodHX IDERun IDE and debugger integration test with RPC interfaceCompile debugger on macOS systemsHX ToolsDesign offline-chain matchmaking trade schemeAdd user asset deposit and withdrawal history query feature and integrate HX JS pluginIntegrate Announcement page with back-endIntegrate Markets page with back-endWe are grateful for the immense effort made by all contributors. Each contributor and community member is vital to the technical development of the HCASH ecosystem.To stay up to date with information, or to join our community, check out the following channels:Twitter, Facebook, Reddit, English Telegram, Chinese Telegram, Korean Telegram, Korean Announcements, KakaoTalk, Naver Blog

HyperCash

19. 03. 15

Weekly Development Update

01 — 07 March 2019The following is a weekly progress report from the HCASH development team. This report is divided in two parts: completed and ongoing work.Our GitHub code can be found here: www.github.com/hcashorgPlease note: code is being uploaded to GitHub progressively; if you find that something from this document is missing from a repository, please check back periodically.Completed work:HyperCash/HCHcdOptimised codeFixed several bugsReleased V2.1.0HcwalletOptimised codeFixed several bugsReleased V2.1.0HyperExchange/HXHX coreConducted research for BTM integrationOptimised several APIsReleased a new versionOptimised HX contract storage performanceCompleted BTM public and private key generation algorithm transplantationAdded a new API for native multi-signal address withdrawalHX IndicatorSet a timeout alert for middleware query before startupFixed contract asset large number compatibility bugHX IDEAdded function entry feature to IDE debug statusFixed ‘contract calculation uncompleted’ bug that appears when modifying contract call interface on IDEHX ToolsAdded market query API to HX Decentralised ExchangeOngoing work:HyperCash/HCHcdAdjust and develop mainnet parametersDevelop ASIC-resistant mining algorithmConduct tests for Linkable RingCT codeHcwalletDevelopment on block validation on ASIC resistant mining algorithmTechnical supportConduct DApp researchHcAutonomyPrepare for new proposalsHyperExchange/HXHX coreModify the storage format of native contractDevelop BTM cross-chain codeFix the bug that appears on Linux systems; starting after the software shuts down normally will trigger blockchain replayHX IndicatorAdd K line featureOptimise pending order history displayHX IDECompile debugger on macOS systemsUse libevent to transfer debug dataHX ToolsDevelop HX Decentralised Exchange HTML5 pending order featureDevelop HX Decentralised Exchange HTML5 Assets pageConduct tests on HX peripheral tools and fix bugsWe are grateful for the immense effort made by all contributors. Each contributor and community member is vital to the technical development of the HCASH ecosystem.To stay up to date with information, or to join our community, check out the following channels:Twitter, Facebook, Reddit, English Telegram, Chinese Telegram, Korean Telegram, Korean Announcements, KakaoTalk, Naver Blog

HyperCash

19. 03. 08

Weekly Development Update

01 — 07 March 2019The following is a weekly progress report from the HCASH development team. This report is divided in two parts: completed and ongoing work.Our GitHub code can be found here: www.github.com/hcashorgPlease note: code is being uploaded to GitHub progressively; if you find that something from this document is missing from a repository, please check back periodically.Completed work:HyperCash/HCHcdOptimised codeFixed several bugsReleased V2.1.0HcwalletOptimised codeFixed several bugsReleased V2.1.0HyperExchange/HXHX coreConducted research for BTM integrationOptimised several APIsReleased a new versionOptimised HX contract storage performanceCompleted BTM public and private key generation algorithm transplantationAdded a new API for native multi-signal address withdrawalHX IndicatorSet a timeout alert for middleware query before startupFixed contract asset large number compatibility bugHX IDEAdded function entry feature to IDE debug statusFixed ‘contract calculation uncompleted’ bug that appears when modifying contract call interface on IDEHX ToolsAdded market query API to HX Decentralised ExchangeOngoing work:HyperCash/HCHcdAdjust and develop mainnet parametersDevelop ASIC-resistant mining algorithmConduct tests for Linkable RingCT codeHcwalletDevelopment on block validation on ASIC resistant mining algorithmTechnical supportConduct DApp researchHcAutonomyPrepare for new proposalsHyperExchange/HXHX coreModify the storage format of native contractDevelop BTM cross-chain codeFix the bug that appears on Linux systems; starting after the software shuts down normally will trigger blockchain replayHX IndicatorAdd K line featureOptimise pending order history displayHX IDECompile debugger on macOS systemsUse libevent to transfer debug dataHX ToolsDevelop HX Decentralised Exchange HTML5 pending order featureDevelop HX Decentralised Exchange HTML5 Assets pageConduct tests on HX peripheral tools and fix bugsWe are grateful for the immense effort made by all contributors. Each contributor and community member is vital to the technical development of the HCASH ecosystem.To stay up to date with information, or to join our community, check out the following channels:Twitter, Facebook, Reddit, English Telegram, Chinese Telegram, Korean Telegram, Korean Announcements, KakaoTalk, Naver Blog

HyperCash

19. 03. 08

Weekly Development Update

01 — 07 March 2019The following is a weekly progress report from the HCASH development team. This report is divided in two parts: completed and ongoing work.Our GitHub code can be found here: www.github.com/hcashorgPlease note: code is being uploaded to GitHub progressively; if you find that something from this document is missing from a repository, please check back periodically.Completed work:HyperCash/HCHcdOptimised codeFixed several bugsReleased V2.1.0HcwalletOptimised codeFixed several bugsReleased V2.1.0HyperExchange/HXHX coreConducted research for BTM integrationOptimised several APIsReleased a new versionOptimised HX contract storage performanceCompleted BTM public and private key generation algorithm transplantationAdded a new API for native multi-signal address withdrawalHX IndicatorSet a timeout alert for middleware query before startupFixed contract asset large number compatibility bugHX IDEAdded function entry feature to IDE debug statusFixed ‘contract calculation uncompleted’ bug that appears when modifying contract call interface on IDEHX ToolsAdded market query API to HX Decentralised ExchangeOngoing work:HyperCash/HCHcdAdjust and develop mainnet parametersDevelop ASIC-resistant mining algorithmConduct tests for Linkable RingCT codeHcwalletDevelopment on block validation on ASIC resistant mining algorithmTechnical supportConduct DApp researchHcAutonomyPrepare for new proposalsHyperExchange/HXHX coreModify the storage format of native contractDevelop BTM cross-chain codeFix the bug that appears on Linux systems; starting after the software shuts down normally will trigger blockchain replayHX IndicatorAdd K line featureOptimise pending order history displayHX IDECompile debugger on macOS systemsUse libevent to transfer debug dataHX ToolsDevelop HX Decentralised Exchange HTML5 pending order featureDevelop HX Decentralised Exchange HTML5 Assets pageConduct tests on HX peripheral tools and fix bugsWe are grateful for the immense effort made by all contributors. Each contributor and community member is vital to the technical development of the HCASH ecosystem.To stay up to date with information, or to join our community, check out the following channels:Twitter, Facebook, Reddit, English Telegram, Chinese Telegram, Korean Telegram, Korean Announcements, KakaoTalk, Naver Blog

HyperCash

19. 03. 08

Weekly Development Update

22–28 Feb 2019The following is a weekly progress report from the HCASH development team. This report is divided in two parts: completed and ongoing work.Our GitHub code can be found here: www.github.com/HcashOrgPlease note: code is being uploaded to GitHub progressively; if you find that something from this document is missing from a repository, please check back periodically.Completed work:HyperCash/HCHcdFixed several bugsOptimised codehcGUIIncreased block rescanning speedHyperExchange/HXHX coreImplemented special account for deposits and transactionsOptimised connectionHX IndicatorFixed bug that appears when Senators collect rewardsFixed bug that appears on contract tokensAdded language option for first-time installationHX IDEFixed issues that appear when incorporating Java smart contract with blockchainUpgrade Kotlin contract templateFixed memory free issues on editorHX ToolsFixed bugs that appear on HX Decentralised Exchange query functionOngoing work:HyperCash/HCHcdAdjust and develop mainnet parametersDevelop ASIC-resistant mining algorithmConduct tests for Linkable RingCT codeContinue to locate and fix bugsContinue to optimise codeHcwalletDevelopment on block validation on ASIC resistant mining algorithmTechnical supportConduct DApp researchHcAutonomyPrepare for new proposalsHyperExchange/HXHX coreAdd K line feature to HX Exchange pageOptimise HX contract storage performanceOptimise several APIsConduct research for BTM integrationHX IndicatorAdd K line featureHX IDEAdd Network communication module to debuggerCompile debugger on macOS systemsOptimise IDE codeHX ToolsDevelop HX Decentralised Exchange HTML5 home pageDevelop HX Decentralised Exchange HTML5 trading order featureConduct tests on HX peripheral tools and fix bugsWe are grateful for the immense effort made by all contributors. Each contributor and community member is vital to the technical development of the HCASH ecosystem.To stay up to date with information, or to join our community, check out the following channels:Twitter, Facebook, Reddit, English Telegram, Chinese Telegram, Korean Telegram, Korean Announcements, KakaoTalk, Naver Blog

HyperCash

19. 03. 01

Weekly Development Update

22–28 Feb 2019The following is a weekly progress report from the HCASH development team. This report is divided in two parts: completed and ongoing work.Our GitHub code can be found here: www.github.com/HcashOrgPlease note: code is being uploaded to GitHub progressively; if you find that something from this document is missing from a repository, please check back periodically.Completed work:HyperCash/HCHcdFixed several bugsOptimised codehcGUIIncreased block rescanning speedHyperExchange/HXHX coreImplemented special account for deposits and transactionsOptimised connectionHX IndicatorFixed bug that appears when Senators collect rewardsFixed bug that appears on contract tokensAdded language option for first-time installationHX IDEFixed issues that appear when incorporating Java smart contract with blockchainUpgrade Kotlin contract templateFixed memory free issues on editorHX ToolsFixed bugs that appear on HX Decentralised Exchange query functionOngoing work:HyperCash/HCHcdAdjust and develop mainnet parametersDevelop ASIC-resistant mining algorithmConduct tests for Linkable RingCT codeContinue to locate and fix bugsContinue to optimise codeHcwalletDevelopment on block validation on ASIC resistant mining algorithmTechnical supportConduct DApp researchHcAutonomyPrepare for new proposalsHyperExchange/HXHX coreAdd K line feature to HX Exchange pageOptimise HX contract storage performanceOptimise several APIsConduct research for BTM integrationHX IndicatorAdd K line featureHX IDEAdd Network communication module to debuggerCompile debugger on macOS systemsOptimise IDE codeHX ToolsDevelop HX Decentralised Exchange HTML5 home pageDevelop HX Decentralised Exchange HTML5 trading order featureConduct tests on HX peripheral tools and fix bugsWe are grateful for the immense effort made by all contributors. Each contributor and community member is vital to the technical development of the HCASH ecosystem.To stay up to date with information, or to join our community, check out the following channels:Twitter, Facebook, Reddit, English Telegram, Chinese Telegram, Korean Telegram, Korean Announcements, KakaoTalk, Naver Blog

HyperCash

19. 03. 01

Weekly Development Update

22–28 Feb 2019The following is a weekly progress report from the HCASH development team. This report is divided in two parts: completed and ongoing work.Our GitHub code can be found here: www.github.com/HcashOrgPlease note: code is being uploaded to GitHub progressively; if you find that something from this document is missing from a repository, please check back periodically.Completed work:HyperCash/HCHcdFixed several bugsOptimised codehcGUIIncreased block rescanning speedHyperExchange/HXHX coreImplemented special account for deposits and transactionsOptimised connectionHX IndicatorFixed bug that appears when Senators collect rewardsFixed bug that appears on contract tokensAdded language option for first-time installationHX IDEFixed issues that appear when incorporating Java smart contract with blockchainUpgrade Kotlin contract templateFixed memory free issues on editorHX ToolsFixed bugs that appear on HX Decentralised Exchange query functionOngoing work:HyperCash/HCHcdAdjust and develop mainnet parametersDevelop ASIC-resistant mining algorithmConduct tests for Linkable RingCT codeContinue to locate and fix bugsContinue to optimise codeHcwalletDevelopment on block validation on ASIC resistant mining algorithmTechnical supportConduct DApp researchHcAutonomyPrepare for new proposalsHyperExchange/HXHX coreAdd K line feature to HX Exchange pageOptimise HX contract storage performanceOptimise several APIsConduct research for BTM integrationHX IndicatorAdd K line featureHX IDEAdd Network communication module to debuggerCompile debugger on macOS systemsOptimise IDE codeHX ToolsDevelop HX Decentralised Exchange HTML5 home pageDevelop HX Decentralised Exchange HTML5 trading order featureConduct tests on HX peripheral tools and fix bugsWe are grateful for the immense effort made by all contributors. Each contributor and community member is vital to the technical development of the HCASH ecosystem.To stay up to date with information, or to join our community, check out the following channels:Twitter, Facebook, Reddit, English Telegram, Chinese Telegram, Korean Telegram, Korean Announcements, KakaoTalk, Naver Blog

HyperCash

19. 03. 01

Weekly Development Update

22–28 Feb 2019The following is a weekly progress report from the HCASH development team. This report is divided in two parts: completed and ongoing work.Our GitHub code can be found here: www.github.com/HcashOrgPlease note: code is being uploaded to GitHub progressively; if you find that something from this document is missing from a repository, please check back periodically.Completed work:HyperCash/HCHcdFixed several bugsOptimised codehcGUIIncreased block rescanning speedHyperExchange/HXHX coreImplemented special account for deposits and transactionsOptimised connectionHX IndicatorFixed bug that appears when Senators collect rewardsFixed bug that appears on contract tokensAdded language option for first-time installationHX IDEFixed issues that appear when incorporating Java smart contract with blockchainUpgrade Kotlin contract templateFixed memory free issues on editorHX ToolsFixed bugs that appear on HX Decentralised Exchange query functionOngoing work:HyperCash/HCHcdAdjust and develop mainnet parametersDevelop ASIC-resistant mining algorithmConduct tests for Linkable RingCT codeContinue to locate and fix bugsContinue to optimise codeHcwalletDevelopment on block validation on ASIC resistant mining algorithmTechnical supportConduct DApp researchHcAutonomyPrepare for new proposalsHyperExchange/HXHX coreAdd K line feature to HX Exchange pageOptimise HX contract storage performanceOptimise several APIsConduct research for BTM integrationHX IndicatorAdd K line featureHX IDEAdd Network communication module to debuggerCompile debugger on macOS systemsOptimise IDE codeHX ToolsDevelop HX Decentralised Exchange HTML5 home pageDevelop HX Decentralised Exchange HTML5 trading order featureConduct tests on HX peripheral tools and fix bugsWe are grateful for the immense effort made by all contributors. Each contributor and community member is vital to the technical development of the HCASH ecosystem.To stay up to date with information, or to join our community, check out the following channels:Twitter, Facebook, Reddit, English Telegram, Chinese Telegram, Korean Telegram, Korean Announcements, KakaoTalk, Naver Blog

HyperCash

19. 03. 01

Ring Signatures, Blockchain...

The HyperCash development team has completed and released code for the implementation of Post-Quantum Linkable Ring Signatures in HC, and is now entering the deployment testing phase. This algorithm is based on a publication written by HCASH Chief Scientist, Dr Joseph Liu and his colleagues “Post-Quantum One-Time Linkable Ring Signature and Application to Ring Confidential Transactions in Blockchain”, which was published by the International Association for Cryptologic Research.Last November, Dr Joseph was announced as the Australian Computer Society’s ICT Researcher of the Year, at the 2018 Digital Disruptor Awards, recognising his ground-breaking research in advancing blockchain technology as a legitimate way to create new economic and social systems. These new developments, based on research conducted by some of the brightest minds in the industry, brings users of HC benefits from its high level of privacy and security.About ring signaturesIn cryptography, a ring signature is a type of digital signature that can be performed by any member of a group of users with cryptographic keys. A transaction message signed with a ring signature is verified by someone in a particular group of people, without revealing the public key (or identity) of the sender, receiver, the signatory or any of the other members of the group, while also withholding the transaction amount.The first cryptocurrency which successfully implemented an algorithm using ring signatures was Monero. In 2015, Dr Shen Noether published an article entitled “Ring Confidential Transactions”, which laid the foundation for the ring signature algorithm implemented in Monero.Much like Bitcoin, this implementation of the signature algorithm uses a “hash-based public key + private key” approach. The difference is, that the addition of the ring signature technology mixes the transaction sender’s public key with other public keys, and only then does it sign the information. When the receiver receives the transaction, they use their own private key to verify the signature. As such, other people (including potential malicious parties) are not able to tell which one of the public keys belongs to the sender. This gives Monero the capability of hiding the sender’s address information, making it impossible for external attackers to target the sender.In September 2017, Monero implemented a hard fork, and integrated RCT (Ring Signature Technology) to encrypt the transaction amount when making transactions, meaning that no one, except the sender and receiver can track any transaction details (including sender’s address and value of the inputs). After this, the new RCT address became the only address format for Monero.Blockchain security and privacy protectionAt the beginning of this year, blockchain analysis firm Chainalysis announced that it had received $30 million in Round B financing, led by Silicon Valley VC firm, Accel. In April last year, Chainalysis completed $16 million of Round A financing.Accel has invested in well-known companies such as Facebook, Dropbox, and Spotify, and has also shown interest blockchain technology. They believe that cryptocurrencies will achieve growth and will be subject to stricter supervision, leading them to their investment in Chainalysis.However, there are also concerns in the industry that blockchain data analysis companies such as Chainalysis, have played a role in promoting the compliance of blockchain companies, at the risk of user privacy. Foregoing user privacy systems can allow third parties to see balances in other users’ hot and cold wallets by simply transferring small amounts of funds to their target’s wallet address and observing the transaction’s UTXO dynamics.This type of analysis is generally based on probabilistic guessing, and associated wallets can be flagged as a risk — this is problematic when unwitting and legitimate users are considered a risk by compliance agencies. Given that regulation in the blockchain industry is not yet mature, users mistakenly deemed as a risk have no way to combat their classification. Because of this, privacy protection and blockchain security have become important considerations for the design of many new blockchain projects. More and more projects are improving the privacy and security of transactions through various methods to help users “blur” their wallet balance and transaction records, preventing their normal wallet activities from being tracked.A brief comparison of privacy protection technologiesWhen blockchain technology was first introduced, privacy was one of its core characteristics. For example, when Bitcoin is used as a payment method, all that is needed is an electronic address consisting of a string of alphanumeric characters, rather than a bank account that is connected to a personal identity, and is therefore at risk of privacy breaches. However, this level of privacy is called “pseudo-privacy”, which is similar to using a pseudonym to hide a real identity when writing a letter. Once an electronic address is obtained (or our analog “pseudonym”) and is associated with any real identity, privacy is breached. In the current information age, the cost of obtaining this information is not high. Therefore, some blockchain technology researchers have been focusing on exploring higher levels of privacy and security protection technologies.There are two main metrics used in privacy protection to evaluate a technology; relevance and traceability. For example, although Bitcoin replaces the identity information with an electronic address, we can still trace back to a certain transaction, and then find out the owner’s identity by analysing relevant information. In order to achieve a higher level of privacy and security, this relevance and traceability must be removed. Currently, the most widely used technologies to achieve this goal are ring signatures and zero-knowledge proof.Some examples of privacy protection technologies in well-known blockchains:When you spend Monero, the value of the inputs and outputs you are sending are encrypted and disguised to everyone except the receiver of each of those outputs. Pedersen commitments allow you to send Monero without revealing the value of the transactions. They also use RingCT, which allows for hidden amounts, origins and destinations of transactions with reasonable efficiency, and verifiable, trustless coin generation. In this case, people can prove that the signer (who is also the token sender) belongs to a certain “signature ring”, but cannot correspond the sender’s address and signature to any one of them.We take ZCASH as an example to explain zero-knowledge proof. Zcash addresses are either private (z-addresses) or transparent (t-addresses). Z-addresses start with a “z,” and t-addresses start with a “t.” A Z-to-Z transaction appears on the public blockchain, so it is known to have occurred and that the fee was paid. However, addresses, transaction amounts, and the memo field are all encrypted and not publicly visible. Third parties who are neither the sender nor the receiver of a transaction will not be able to obtain any information about the encrypted transaction — even the miner responsible for recording the transaction is not be able to obtain the encrypted address and the transaction amount. When an encrypted transaction is recorded, the miner is only allowed to record that “there is an unspent balance, and a transaction is generated”, and not allowed to record the blocked address and the transaction amount itself.We can see that both RingCT and zero-knowledge proof are higher-level privacy protection technologies. Zero-knowledge proof is highly dependent on a blockchain’s initial parameters. In current implementations of zero-knowledge proof technology, it is difficult to implement mobile payment methods because the signature is very large and highly affected by the network. It is worth mentioning that the HCASH development team is working on improving zero-knowledge proof tehnology to enable mobile payment methods.HCASH community member Ryan Xu also wrote, that for privacy protection and blockchain security, ring signature technology is still the best choice in the present, and pereceivable future.HCASH post-quantum linkable ring signaturesThe HyperCash team has adapted and improved current RingCT technology. Dr Joseph Liu and his team present a lattice-based post-quantum secure Ring CT protocol, that supports multi-input-multi-output transactions. It is a comprehensive Ring CT protocol, such that it contains all necessary parts including a linkable ring signature (for user anonymity), commitment scheme (for hiding the transaction amount) and range proof (to ensure the hidden value is a positive amount). All parts are in a lattice-based setting, meaning that the overall protocol is post-quantum secure.The release of this code enables other projects and users to gain access to HCASH’s version of post-quantum signature application and privacy protection. In future, the HCASH development team will continue to conduct more in-depth research in the direction of post-quantum signatures and ring signatures. Dr Joseph Liu will post an improved version of the current linkable ring signature scheme paper based on the present Monero ring signature. The upcoming paper is proposing to allow higher number of signatures by an order of magnitude three to four times greater than that of the current version of Monero. According to the HyperCash technology yellow paper, HC will continue to implement lattice-based post-quantum signature code, and become an industry leader in the protection of privacy.See HCASH’s Post-Quantum Linkable Ring Signature code at:https://github.com/chainchip/Lattice-RingCT-v2.0To stay up to date with information, or to join our community, check out the following channels:Twitter, Facebook, Reddit, English Telegram, Chinese Telegram, Korean Telegram, Korean Announcements, KakaoTalk, Naver Blog

HyperCash

19. 02. 28

Ring Signatures, Blockchain...

The HyperCash development team has completed and released code for the implementation of Post-Quantum Linkable Ring Signatures in HC, and is now entering the deployment testing phase. This algorithm is based on a publication written by HCASH Chief Scientist, Dr Joseph Liu and his colleagues “Post-Quantum One-Time Linkable Ring Signature and Application to Ring Confidential Transactions in Blockchain”, which was published by the International Association for Cryptologic Research.Last November, Dr Joseph was announced as the Australian Computer Society’s ICT Researcher of the Year, at the 2018 Digital Disruptor Awards, recognising his ground-breaking research in advancing blockchain technology as a legitimate way to create new economic and social systems. These new developments, based on research conducted by some of the brightest minds in the industry, brings users of HC benefits from its high level of privacy and security.About ring signaturesIn cryptography, a ring signature is a type of digital signature that can be performed by any member of a group of users with cryptographic keys. A transaction message signed with a ring signature is verified by someone in a particular group of people, without revealing the public key (or identity) of the sender, receiver, the signatory or any of the other members of the group, while also withholding the transaction amount.The first cryptocurrency which successfully implemented an algorithm using ring signatures was Monero. In 2015, Dr Shen Noether published an article entitled “Ring Confidential Transactions”, which laid the foundation for the ring signature algorithm implemented in Monero.Much like Bitcoin, this implementation of the signature algorithm uses a “hash-based public key + private key” approach. The difference is, that the addition of the ring signature technology mixes the transaction sender’s public key with other public keys, and only then does it sign the information. When the receiver receives the transaction, they use their own private key to verify the signature. As such, other people (including potential malicious parties) are not able to tell which one of the public keys belongs to the sender. This gives Monero the capability of hiding the sender’s address information, making it impossible for external attackers to target the sender.In September 2017, Monero implemented a hard fork, and integrated RCT (Ring Signature Technology) to encrypt the transaction amount when making transactions, meaning that no one, except the sender and receiver can track any transaction details (including sender’s address and value of the inputs). After this, the new RCT address became the only address format for Monero.Blockchain security and privacy protectionAt the beginning of this year, blockchain analysis firm Chainalysis announced that it had received $30 million in Round B financing, led by Silicon Valley VC firm, Accel. In April last year, Chainalysis completed $16 million of Round A financing.Accel has invested in well-known companies such as Facebook, Dropbox, and Spotify, and has also shown interest blockchain technology. They believe that cryptocurrencies will achieve growth and will be subject to stricter supervision, leading them to their investment in Chainalysis.However, there are also concerns in the industry that blockchain data analysis companies such as Chainalysis, have played a role in promoting the compliance of blockchain companies, at the risk of user privacy. Foregoing user privacy systems can allow third parties to see balances in other users’ hot and cold wallets by simply transferring small amounts of funds to their target’s wallet address and observing the transaction’s UTXO dynamics.This type of analysis is generally based on probabilistic guessing, and associated wallets can be flagged as a risk — this is problematic when unwitting and legitimate users are considered a risk by compliance agencies. Given that regulation in the blockchain industry is not yet mature, users mistakenly deemed as a risk have no way to combat their classification. Because of this, privacy protection and blockchain security have become important considerations for the design of many new blockchain projects. More and more projects are improving the privacy and security of transactions through various methods to help users “blur” their wallet balance and transaction records, preventing their normal wallet activities from being tracked.A brief comparison of privacy protection technologiesWhen blockchain technology was first introduced, privacy was one of its core characteristics. For example, when Bitcoin is used as a payment method, all that is needed is an electronic address consisting of a string of alphanumeric characters, rather than a bank account that is connected to a personal identity, and is therefore at risk of privacy breaches. However, this level of privacy is called “pseudo-privacy”, which is similar to using a pseudonym to hide a real identity when writing a letter. Once an electronic address is obtained (or our analog “pseudonym”) and is associated with any real identity, privacy is breached. In the current information age, the cost of obtaining this information is not high. Therefore, some blockchain technology researchers have been focusing on exploring higher levels of privacy and security protection technologies.There are two main metrics used in privacy protection to evaluate a technology; relevance and traceability. For example, although Bitcoin replaces the identity information with an electronic address, we can still trace back to a certain transaction, and then find out the owner’s identity by analysing relevant information. In order to achieve a higher level of privacy and security, this relevance and traceability must be removed. Currently, the most widely used technologies to achieve this goal are ring signatures and zero-knowledge proof.Some examples of privacy protection technologies in well-known blockchains:When you spend Monero, the value of the inputs and outputs you are sending are encrypted and disguised to everyone except the receiver of each of those outputs. Pedersen commitments allow you to send Monero without revealing the value of the transactions. They also use RingCT, which allows for hidden amounts, origins and destinations of transactions with reasonable efficiency, and verifiable, trustless coin generation. In this case, people can prove that the signer (who is also the token sender) belongs to a certain “signature ring”, but cannot correspond the sender’s address and signature to any one of them.We take ZCASH as an example to explain zero-knowledge proof. Zcash addresses are either private (z-addresses) or transparent (t-addresses). Z-addresses start with a “z,” and t-addresses start with a “t.” A Z-to-Z transaction appears on the public blockchain, so it is known to have occurred and that the fee was paid. However, addresses, transaction amounts, and the memo field are all encrypted and not publicly visible. Third parties who are neither the sender nor the receiver of a transaction will not be able to obtain any information about the encrypted transaction — even the miner responsible for recording the transaction is not be able to obtain the encrypted address and the transaction amount. When an encrypted transaction is recorded, the miner is only allowed to record that “there is an unspent balance, and a transaction is generated”, and not allowed to record the blocked address and the transaction amount itself.We can see that both RingCT and zero-knowledge proof are higher-level privacy protection technologies. Zero-knowledge proof is highly dependent on a blockchain’s initial parameters. In current implementations of zero-knowledge proof technology, it is difficult to implement mobile payment methods because the signature is very large and highly affected by the network. It is worth mentioning that the HCASH development team is working on improving zero-knowledge proof tehnology to enable mobile payment methods.HCASH community member Ryan Xu also wrote, that for privacy protection and blockchain security, ring signature technology is still the best choice in the present, and pereceivable future.HCASH post-quantum linkable ring signaturesThe HyperCash team has adapted and improved current RingCT technology. Dr Joseph Liu and his team present a lattice-based post-quantum secure Ring CT protocol, that supports multi-input-multi-output transactions. It is a comprehensive Ring CT protocol, such that it contains all necessary parts including a linkable ring signature (for user anonymity), commitment scheme (for hiding the transaction amount) and range proof (to ensure the hidden value is a positive amount). All parts are in a lattice-based setting, meaning that the overall protocol is post-quantum secure.The release of this code enables other projects and users to gain access to HCASH’s version of post-quantum signature application and privacy protection. In future, the HCASH development team will continue to conduct more in-depth research in the direction of post-quantum signatures and ring signatures. Dr Joseph Liu will post an improved version of the current linkable ring signature scheme paper based on the present Monero ring signature. The upcoming paper is proposing to allow higher number of signatures by an order of magnitude three to four times greater than that of the current version of Monero. According to the HyperCash technology yellow paper, HC will continue to implement lattice-based post-quantum signature code, and become an industry leader in the protection of privacy.See HCASH’s Post-Quantum Linkable Ring Signature code at:https://github.com/chainchip/Lattice-RingCT-v2.0To stay up to date with information, or to join our community, check out the following channels:Twitter, Facebook, Reddit, English Telegram, Chinese Telegram, Korean Telegram, Korean Announcements, KakaoTalk, Naver Blog

HyperCash

19. 02. 28

Ring Signatures, Blockchain...

The HyperCash development team has completed and released code for the implementation of Post-Quantum Linkable Ring Signatures in HC, and is now entering the deployment testing phase. This algorithm is based on a publication written by HCASH Chief Scientist, Dr Joseph Liu and his colleagues “Post-Quantum One-Time Linkable Ring Signature and Application to Ring Confidential Transactions in Blockchain”, which was published by the International Association for Cryptologic Research.Last November, Dr Joseph was announced as the Australian Computer Society’s ICT Researcher of the Year, at the 2018 Digital Disruptor Awards, recognising his ground-breaking research in advancing blockchain technology as a legitimate way to create new economic and social systems. These new developments, based on research conducted by some of the brightest minds in the industry, brings users of HC benefits from its high level of privacy and security.About ring signaturesIn cryptography, a ring signature is a type of digital signature that can be performed by any member of a group of users with cryptographic keys. A transaction message signed with a ring signature is verified by someone in a particular group of people, without revealing the public key (or identity) of the sender, receiver, the signatory or any of the other members of the group, while also withholding the transaction amount.The first cryptocurrency which successfully implemented an algorithm using ring signatures was Monero. In 2015, Dr Shen Noether published an article entitled “Ring Confidential Transactions”, which laid the foundation for the ring signature algorithm implemented in Monero.Much like Bitcoin, this implementation of the signature algorithm uses a “hash-based public key + private key” approach. The difference is, that the addition of the ring signature technology mixes the transaction sender’s public key with other public keys, and only then does it sign the information. When the receiver receives the transaction, they use their own private key to verify the signature. As such, other people (including potential malicious parties) are not able to tell which one of the public keys belongs to the sender. This gives Monero the capability of hiding the sender’s address information, making it impossible for external attackers to target the sender.In September 2017, Monero implemented a hard fork, and integrated RCT (Ring Signature Technology) to encrypt the transaction amount when making transactions, meaning that no one, except the sender and receiver can track any transaction details (including sender’s address and value of the inputs). After this, the new RCT address became the only address format for Monero.Blockchain security and privacy protectionAt the beginning of this year, blockchain analysis firm Chainalysis announced that it had received $30 million in Round B financing, led by Silicon Valley VC firm, Accel. In April last year, Chainalysis completed $16 million of Round A financing.Accel has invested in well-known companies such as Facebook, Dropbox, and Spotify, and has also shown interest blockchain technology. They believe that cryptocurrencies will achieve growth and will be subject to stricter supervision, leading them to their investment in Chainalysis.However, there are also concerns in the industry that blockchain data analysis companies such as Chainalysis, have played a role in promoting the compliance of blockchain companies, at the risk of user privacy. Foregoing user privacy systems can allow third parties to see balances in other users’ hot and cold wallets by simply transferring small amounts of funds to their target’s wallet address and observing the transaction’s UTXO dynamics.This type of analysis is generally based on probabilistic guessing, and associated wallets can be flagged as a risk — this is problematic when unwitting and legitimate users are considered a risk by compliance agencies. Given that regulation in the blockchain industry is not yet mature, users mistakenly deemed as a risk have no way to combat their classification. Because of this, privacy protection and blockchain security have become important considerations for the design of many new blockchain projects. More and more projects are improving the privacy and security of transactions through various methods to help users “blur” their wallet balance and transaction records, preventing their normal wallet activities from being tracked.A brief comparison of privacy protection technologiesWhen blockchain technology was first introduced, privacy was one of its core characteristics. For example, when Bitcoin is used as a payment method, all that is needed is an electronic address consisting of a string of alphanumeric characters, rather than a bank account that is connected to a personal identity, and is therefore at risk of privacy breaches. However, this level of privacy is called “pseudo-privacy”, which is similar to using a pseudonym to hide a real identity when writing a letter. Once an electronic address is obtained (or our analog “pseudonym”) and is associated with any real identity, privacy is breached. In the current information age, the cost of obtaining this information is not high. Therefore, some blockchain technology researchers have been focusing on exploring higher levels of privacy and security protection technologies.There are two main metrics used in privacy protection to evaluate a technology; relevance and traceability. For example, although Bitcoin replaces the identity information with an electronic address, we can still trace back to a certain transaction, and then find out the owner’s identity by analysing relevant information. In order to achieve a higher level of privacy and security, this relevance and traceability must be removed. Currently, the most widely used technologies to achieve this goal are ring signatures and zero-knowledge proof.Some examples of privacy protection technologies in well-known blockchains:When you spend Monero, the value of the inputs and outputs you are sending are encrypted and disguised to everyone except the receiver of each of those outputs. Pedersen commitments allow you to send Monero without revealing the value of the transactions. They also use RingCT, which allows for hidden amounts, origins and destinations of transactions with reasonable efficiency, and verifiable, trustless coin generation. In this case, people can prove that the signer (who is also the token sender) belongs to a certain “signature ring”, but cannot correspond the sender’s address and signature to any one of them.We take ZCASH as an example to explain zero-knowledge proof. Zcash addresses are either private (z-addresses) or transparent (t-addresses). Z-addresses start with a “z,” and t-addresses start with a “t.” A Z-to-Z transaction appears on the public blockchain, so it is known to have occurred and that the fee was paid. However, addresses, transaction amounts, and the memo field are all encrypted and not publicly visible. Third parties who are neither the sender nor the receiver of a transaction will not be able to obtain any information about the encrypted transaction — even the miner responsible for recording the transaction is not be able to obtain the encrypted address and the transaction amount. When an encrypted transaction is recorded, the miner is only allowed to record that “there is an unspent balance, and a transaction is generated”, and not allowed to record the blocked address and the transaction amount itself.We can see that both RingCT and zero-knowledge proof are higher-level privacy protection technologies. Zero-knowledge proof is highly dependent on a blockchain’s initial parameters. In current implementations of zero-knowledge proof technology, it is difficult to implement mobile payment methods because the signature is very large and highly affected by the network. It is worth mentioning that the HCASH development team is working on improving zero-knowledge proof tehnology to enable mobile payment methods.HCASH community member Ryan Xu also wrote, that for privacy protection and blockchain security, ring signature technology is still the best choice in the present, and pereceivable future.HCASH post-quantum linkable ring signaturesThe HyperCash team has adapted and improved current RingCT technology. Dr Joseph Liu and his team present a lattice-based post-quantum secure Ring CT protocol, that supports multi-input-multi-output transactions. It is a comprehensive Ring CT protocol, such that it contains all necessary parts including a linkable ring signature (for user anonymity), commitment scheme (for hiding the transaction amount) and range proof (to ensure the hidden value is a positive amount). All parts are in a lattice-based setting, meaning that the overall protocol is post-quantum secure.The release of this code enables other projects and users to gain access to HCASH’s version of post-quantum signature application and privacy protection. In future, the HCASH development team will continue to conduct more in-depth research in the direction of post-quantum signatures and ring signatures. Dr Joseph Liu will post an improved version of the current linkable ring signature scheme paper based on the present Monero ring signature. The upcoming paper is proposing to allow higher number of signatures by an order of magnitude three to four times greater than that of the current version of Monero. According to the HyperCash technology yellow paper, HC will continue to implement lattice-based post-quantum signature code, and become an industry leader in the protection of privacy.See HCASH’s Post-Quantum Linkable Ring Signature code at:https://github.com/chainchip/Lattice-RingCT-v2.0To stay up to date with information, or to join our community, check out the following channels:Twitter, Facebook, Reddit, English Telegram, Chinese Telegram, Korean Telegram, Korean Announcements, KakaoTalk, Naver Blog

HyperCash

19. 02. 28

Ring Signatures, Blockchain...

The HyperCash development team has completed and released code for the implementation of Post-Quantum Linkable Ring Signatures in HC, and is now entering the deployment testing phase. This algorithm is based on a publication written by HCASH Chief Scientist, Dr Joseph Liu and his colleagues “Post-Quantum One-Time Linkable Ring Signature and Application to Ring Confidential Transactions in Blockchain”, which was published by the International Association for Cryptologic Research.Last November, Dr Joseph was announced as the Australian Computer Society’s ICT Researcher of the Year, at the 2018 Digital Disruptor Awards, recognising his ground-breaking research in advancing blockchain technology as a legitimate way to create new economic and social systems. These new developments, based on research conducted by some of the brightest minds in the industry, brings users of HC benefits from its high level of privacy and security.About ring signaturesIn cryptography, a ring signature is a type of digital signature that can be performed by any member of a group of users with cryptographic keys. A transaction message signed with a ring signature is verified by someone in a particular group of people, without revealing the public key (or identity) of the sender, receiver, the signatory or any of the other members of the group, while also withholding the transaction amount.The first cryptocurrency which successfully implemented an algorithm using ring signatures was Monero. In 2015, Dr Shen Noether published an article entitled “Ring Confidential Transactions”, which laid the foundation for the ring signature algorithm implemented in Monero.Much like Bitcoin, this implementation of the signature algorithm uses a “hash-based public key + private key” approach. The difference is, that the addition of the ring signature technology mixes the transaction sender’s public key with other public keys, and only then does it sign the information. When the receiver receives the transaction, they use their own private key to verify the signature. As such, other people (including potential malicious parties) are not able to tell which one of the public keys belongs to the sender. This gives Monero the capability of hiding the sender’s address information, making it impossible for external attackers to target the sender.In September 2017, Monero implemented a hard fork, and integrated RCT (Ring Signature Technology) to encrypt the transaction amount when making transactions, meaning that no one, except the sender and receiver can track any transaction details (including sender’s address and value of the inputs). After this, the new RCT address became the only address format for Monero.Blockchain security and privacy protectionAt the beginning of this year, blockchain analysis firm Chainalysis announced that it had received $30 million in Round B financing, led by Silicon Valley VC firm, Accel. In April last year, Chainalysis completed $16 million of Round A financing.Accel has invested in well-known companies such as Facebook, Dropbox, and Spotify, and has also shown interest blockchain technology. They believe that cryptocurrencies will achieve growth and will be subject to stricter supervision, leading them to their investment in Chainalysis.However, there are also concerns in the industry that blockchain data analysis companies such as Chainalysis, have played a role in promoting the compliance of blockchain companies, at the risk of user privacy. Foregoing user privacy systems can allow third parties to see balances in other users’ hot and cold wallets by simply transferring small amounts of funds to their target’s wallet address and observing the transaction’s UTXO dynamics.This type of analysis is generally based on probabilistic guessing, and associated wallets can be flagged as a risk — this is problematic when unwitting and legitimate users are considered a risk by compliance agencies. Given that regulation in the blockchain industry is not yet mature, users mistakenly deemed as a risk have no way to combat their classification. Because of this, privacy protection and blockchain security have become important considerations for the design of many new blockchain projects. More and more projects are improving the privacy and security of transactions through various methods to help users “blur” their wallet balance and transaction records, preventing their normal wallet activities from being tracked.A brief comparison of privacy protection technologiesWhen blockchain technology was first introduced, privacy was one of its core characteristics. For example, when Bitcoin is used as a payment method, all that is needed is an electronic address consisting of a string of alphanumeric characters, rather than a bank account that is connected to a personal identity, and is therefore at risk of privacy breaches. However, this level of privacy is called “pseudo-privacy”, which is similar to using a pseudonym to hide a real identity when writing a letter. Once an electronic address is obtained (or our analog “pseudonym”) and is associated with any real identity, privacy is breached. In the current information age, the cost of obtaining this information is not high. Therefore, some blockchain technology researchers have been focusing on exploring higher levels of privacy and security protection technologies.There are two main metrics used in privacy protection to evaluate a technology; relevance and traceability. For example, although Bitcoin replaces the identity information with an electronic address, we can still trace back to a certain transaction, and then find out the owner’s identity by analysing relevant information. In order to achieve a higher level of privacy and security, this relevance and traceability must be removed. Currently, the most widely used technologies to achieve this goal are ring signatures and zero-knowledge proof.Some examples of privacy protection technologies in well-known blockchains:When you spend Monero, the value of the inputs and outputs you are sending are encrypted and disguised to everyone except the receiver of each of those outputs. Pedersen commitments allow you to send Monero without revealing the value of the transactions. They also use RingCT, which allows for hidden amounts, origins and destinations of transactions with reasonable efficiency, and verifiable, trustless coin generation. In this case, people can prove that the signer (who is also the token sender) belongs to a certain “signature ring”, but cannot correspond the sender’s address and signature to any one of them.We take ZCASH as an example to explain zero-knowledge proof. Zcash addresses are either private (z-addresses) or transparent (t-addresses). Z-addresses start with a “z,” and t-addresses start with a “t.” A Z-to-Z transaction appears on the public blockchain, so it is known to have occurred and that the fee was paid. However, addresses, transaction amounts, and the memo field are all encrypted and not publicly visible. Third parties who are neither the sender nor the receiver of a transaction will not be able to obtain any information about the encrypted transaction — even the miner responsible for recording the transaction is not be able to obtain the encrypted address and the transaction amount. When an encrypted transaction is recorded, the miner is only allowed to record that “there is an unspent balance, and a transaction is generated”, and not allowed to record the blocked address and the transaction amount itself.We can see that both RingCT and zero-knowledge proof are higher-level privacy protection technologies. Zero-knowledge proof is highly dependent on a blockchain’s initial parameters. In current implementations of zero-knowledge proof technology, it is difficult to implement mobile payment methods because the signature is very large and highly affected by the network. It is worth mentioning that the HCASH development team is working on improving zero-knowledge proof tehnology to enable mobile payment methods.HCASH community member Ryan Xu also wrote, that for privacy protection and blockchain security, ring signature technology is still the best choice in the present, and pereceivable future.HCASH post-quantum linkable ring signaturesThe HyperCash team has adapted and improved current RingCT technology. Dr Joseph Liu and his team present a lattice-based post-quantum secure Ring CT protocol, that supports multi-input-multi-output transactions. It is a comprehensive Ring CT protocol, such that it contains all necessary parts including a linkable ring signature (for user anonymity), commitment scheme (for hiding the transaction amount) and range proof (to ensure the hidden value is a positive amount). All parts are in a lattice-based setting, meaning that the overall protocol is post-quantum secure.The release of this code enables other projects and users to gain access to HCASH’s version of post-quantum signature application and privacy protection. In future, the HCASH development team will continue to conduct more in-depth research in the direction of post-quantum signatures and ring signatures. Dr Joseph Liu will post an improved version of the current linkable ring signature scheme paper based on the present Monero ring signature. The upcoming paper is proposing to allow higher number of signatures by an order of magnitude three to four times greater than that of the current version of Monero. According to the HyperCash technology yellow paper, HC will continue to implement lattice-based post-quantum signature code, and become an industry leader in the protection of privacy.See HCASH’s Post-Quantum Linkable Ring Signature code at:https://github.com/chainchip/Lattice-RingCT-v2.0To stay up to date with information, or to join our community, check out the following channels:Twitter, Facebook, Reddit, English Telegram, Chinese Telegram, Korean Telegram, Korean Announcements, KakaoTalk, Naver Blog

HyperCash

19. 02. 28

Why go ASIC Resistant?

Since HCASH released its yellow paper in July 2018, the Foundation have been continually reviewing methods of preventing ASIC mining hardware from being deployed, as wide-spread ASIC mining use could effectively create computing power monopolies; a system whereby one or a small number of powerful miners dominate a blockchain network.Today, after half a year of research and development, the HyperCash team are ready to deploy their new ASIC-resistant algorithm.The origins of ASIC mining (and its resistance), and the threat of computing power monopoliesHyperCash is not the only project that has realised the potential harm that could be caused by ASIC mining to communities and network stability.More and more projects are now developing ASIC resistant mining machines.Take Monero for example. When Bitmain released an ASIC mining machine capable of mining Monero and other CryptoNight algorithm tokens, the Monero community became deeply concerned as it quickly became apparent that the computing power of these mining machines would be way higher than any other mining machine currently in use, thus enabling a monopoly to be formed. To counteract this, the Monero community swiftly decided to change their mining algorithm via a hard fork, to one that incorporates ASIC resistance. The hard fork outcome was widely welcomed by Monero miners and community members. Since the fork, the price of the Monero token has risen sharply (indicating its perceived value) and is widely known as a cryptocurrency whereby GPU mining is still attainable and profitable; something that is considered important to those still viewing cryptocurrencies as a ‘tool for the everyman’, and not another outlet for faceless companies to earn profits from. Further efforts to keep this status-quo have been implemented by Monero’s team. The project announced through social media channels that they will revise their current mining algorithm every 6 months to prevent against new ASIC hardware being developed and implemented, and ultimately, threatening the network.Another example is Zcash. Zcash, another cryptocurrency that is resistant to ASIC mining machines have gone so far as to set up a technical advisory committee in charge of providing scientific advice on how to remain ASIC-resistant.Lastly, Ethereum. Just earlier this year, Ethereum’s (ETH) core developers reached a preliminary consensus agreement to implement a new Proof-of-Work (PoW) algorithm that will improve GPU-based efficiency — instead of relying on ASIC-based network mining. It is believed that this approach will not only make ASIC mining more “difficult”, but will also stabilize the networks hash value.From here, the question must be asked: why do so many blockchain projects have the desire to resist ASIC mining hardware? To understand this, we must understand exactly what an ASIC mining machine is.When Satoshi Nakamoto was first developing Bitcoin, in his original vision he hoped that people could use home computers to mine tokens. Specifically, he believed that people would rely merely on their CPUs to validate transactions. However, with the increasing value of Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies, mining has become an industry, leading to increase competitiveness and ultimately, difficulty. Therefore, miners started to purchase and use more advanced hardware, and soon after, companies began appearing with the sole intent of researching, developing and updating specialised hardware to mine tokens that utilise specific algorithms, thus the term ‘application-specific integrated circuit’ miner or ASIC miner slowly grew into the widespread phenomenon it is today.The reason for this was that CPUs overall act as general-purpose processers. This means that while they are great at processing a multitude of different functions, they’re not effective at completing specific individual tasks. An example of this can be seen in graphics computing. In terms of graphics processing and 3D computing, it’s clear that CPUs aren’t as good at doing this as GPUs are, hence the creation and widespread adoption of GPUs.An extension of this are ASIC miners. To mine Bitcoin all a computer needs to do is calculate SHA256 hash values; a singular function. And again, even though a general-purpose CPU can calculate these values, they’re not very effective when considering cost and efficiency. Therefore, mining companies have designed application-specific chips whose primary function is for SHA256 (and other algorithms, depending on the token) calculations. Because it is designed to process a specific algorithm, the design of the ASIC chip is much more simple and less expensive than a CPU; and most importantly, in terms of computing power, they are (generally) tens of thousands or more times higher than currently used CPUs and GPUs.This makes it difficult to mine with normal CPUs and limits the market to those with large amounts of resources to spend on specialised hardware with a singular purpose, and access to cheap power.This usually limited the participation pool to professional mining organizations. This phenomenon has led to the emergence of ‘mining tyrants’, leading to a higher and higher entry barrier for those looking to become a miner, which effectively blocks ordinary users from being involved. This, we believe, is not in line with what blockchain networks were meant to be, and thus, we’ve decided to take a stance against it.The threat of centralization caused by a mining monopolyLast year, the Bitcoin Cash (BCH) Hard Fork battle led to the price of Bitcoin falling to below $6,000 USD overnight, and once to nearly $3,000. This unpredictable price drop added to the cryptocurrency markets instability and volatility.The reason that these fluctuations occurred was that during the hard fork, a battle was being waged by two major miners. In this battle, the computing power that was used to maintain normal operations of the BCH blockchain (via mining pools) were being used for other purposes, thus partially compromising the security of the chain, backlogging the validation and processing of transactions due to the now lack of computational power, and, ultimately sowing the seeds of doubt into users minds regarding the stability, longevity and independence of the network.The most questionable thing that has occurred during this phenomenon is the behaviour of the so called “mining tyrants”, whose actions negatively affect the common interests of all blockchain users. Unless dealt with, blockchain will be no different than any other centralised mechanism.Blockchain has always been viewed as a ‘decentralised’ technology. It’s a technology that was marketed as being more independent, fair and democratic. This technology has a large potential to change the world, especially considering its advancements in ledger technology and widespread appeal. However, if computing power becomes monopolised and ordinary users lose their ability to participate, then it begs the question: Is this new system any better than the last centralised system we moved from? Obviously, the potential of mining monopolies casts a shadow on the entire blockchain industry, and it will inevitably chip away at fundamentalist beliefs of the technology, thus, it must be addressed.The rise of Blockchain monopolies heavily affect network securityMonopolies that may form within a network such as BTC, ETH and others not only have the effect of causing centralisation, but also damage the stability and security of the network.These monopolies, that often take the form of mining pools sometimes employ dubious methods to increase their block rate higher than their computing power ratio. These methods include using ASIC boost, selfish mining, eclipse attacks and other means that enable these pools to conduct a 51% attack without needing to own 51% of the computational power on the network. An example can be seen on the XVG blockchain, where a mining tyrant achieved a 51% attack while only owning 10% of the total computational power on the network.ASIC-resistant mining machines and technological progressionWith what’s already been said above it seems fairly clear that ASIC-resistance should be something that all networks should strive to implement, however, there are some objections to these resistant technologies.Some people consider ASIC machines as part of the natural course of progression relating to advancements in science and technology. Others believe that the advent of ASIC mining machines, which can mine faster and cheaper serve a vital purpose of reducing network costs. The fear within some communities is that as networks move away from mining machines and those machines spawn from technological progression, that means that the networks themselves are shying away from that same technological progression; they’re trying to live against technology.In this regard, we must clarify that ASIC hardware is not technically considered to be a natural step in scientific and/or technological progression. Technological progression would imply that things on a network level are becoming more efficient, but they aren’t. If that were true then the network would be using less electricity, which isn’t the case when it comes to bitcoin for example. When Bitcoin first came out in 2009, Nakamoto used his own home computer to mine 7,200 BTC while using only several kWh’s of electricity per day. Now, tens of thousands of high-performance machines (including ASIC machines) around the world mine around 1,800 BTC while consuming millions of kWh’s of electricity per day. This hardware competition that is ultimately fuelled by ASIC mining machines has led to us consuming more energy than necessary. What’s more is that Bitcoin’s block rate is constant, and the blockchain network throughput is more dependent on the speed of the network, rather than the hardware. Thus, we don’t believe that implementing ASIC resistance means to rally against progression, rather, the opposite.ASIC mining machines have increased barriers to entry, which is not conducive to the popularisation and development of blockchain technologyPreviously, ordinary, household individuals were able to participate in the blockchain industry via mining if they had a computer to mine with, even if they didn’t know much about cryptocurrency or couldn’t afford an ASIC mining machine. What’s more, ASIC mining machines, whose target clients are large mining pools and large net worth individuals, are currently monopolised by a limited number of manufacturers.The value of blockchain itself comes from consensus, and consensus comes from the participation of more and more people. The higher the participation rate, the more popular blockchain will be, and the more popular that blockchain is, the more stable and healthy the price of the cryptocurrency. In other words, the more decentralised the environment, the more fair and secure the industry.It can then be derived that the advantages of high speed mining machines do not in-fact aid the network, but merely line the pockets of their owners with more tokens, as the block rate is unaffected. So, ASIC mining machines do not actually promote the development of a network from a technical point of view; on the contrary, it hinders the participation of ordinary people.Thus, in order to prevent against problems caused by monopolies, many new blockchain projects have abandoned the PoW algorithm and have turned to PoW and DPoS algorithms, such as seen in EOS. However, the governance of EOS super nodes have also been questioned. For example, many people think that their super nodes and cloud servers makes it almost impossible for most ordinary users to participate. If blockchains can be centralised, are they still considered as blockchains in the most fundamental sense?The HC team proposed in our yellow paper that the PoW algorithm has been recognised as the safest and most fair consensus algorithm after ten years of community testing, and as such, it should not be abandoned fully due to the potential of monopolies appearing. Thus, as a compromise, the HC team adopted a PoW+PoS hybrid consensus in its mainchain to maintain security, with the additional features and benefits of the PoS consensus mechanism.The combination of the two creates an excellent consensus algorithm for fostering strengths and avoiding shortcomings. The HC team has been preparing solutions for hidden dangers such as mining tyrants and centralised problems by developing and deploying ASIC-resistant algorithms.In conclusion, ASIC-resistant algorithms are necessary to increase community participation and secure network security. The ultimate goal of ASIC-resistant algorithms for each blockchain project, including HC, is not to resist ASIC mining machines, but to reduce barriers to entry, and to create a distributed PoW ecosystem that is as fair as accessible.To stay up to date with information, or to join our community, check out the following channels:Twitter, Facebook, Reddit, English Telegram, Chinese Telegram, Korean Telegram, Korean Announcements, KakaoTalk, Naver Blog

HyperCash

19. 02. 27

Why go ASIC Resistant?

Since HCASH released its yellow paper in July 2018, the Foundation have been continually reviewing methods of preventing ASIC mining hardware from being deployed, as wide-spread ASIC mining use could effectively create computing power monopolies; a system whereby one or a small number of powerful miners dominate a blockchain network.Today, after half a year of research and development, the HyperCash team are ready to deploy their new ASIC-resistant algorithm.The origins of ASIC mining (and its resistance), and the threat of computing power monopoliesHyperCash is not the only project that has realised the potential harm that could be caused by ASIC mining to communities and network stability.More and more projects are now developing ASIC resistant mining machines.Take Monero for example. When Bitmain released an ASIC mining machine capable of mining Monero and other CryptoNight algorithm tokens, the Monero community became deeply concerned as it quickly became apparent that the computing power of these mining machines would be way higher than any other mining machine currently in use, thus enabling a monopoly to be formed. To counteract this, the Monero community swiftly decided to change their mining algorithm via a hard fork, to one that incorporates ASIC resistance. The hard fork outcome was widely welcomed by Monero miners and community members. Since the fork, the price of the Monero token has risen sharply (indicating its perceived value) and is widely known as a cryptocurrency whereby GPU mining is still attainable and profitable; something that is considered important to those still viewing cryptocurrencies as a ‘tool for the everyman’, and not another outlet for faceless companies to earn profits from. Further efforts to keep this status-quo have been implemented by Monero’s team. The project announced through social media channels that they will revise their current mining algorithm every 6 months to prevent against new ASIC hardware being developed and implemented, and ultimately, threatening the network.Another example is Zcash. Zcash, another cryptocurrency that is resistant to ASIC mining machines have gone so far as to set up a technical advisory committee in charge of providing scientific advice on how to remain ASIC-resistant.Lastly, Ethereum. Just earlier this year, Ethereum’s (ETH) core developers reached a preliminary consensus agreement to implement a new Proof-of-Work (PoW) algorithm that will improve GPU-based efficiency — instead of relying on ASIC-based network mining. It is believed that this approach will not only make ASIC mining more “difficult”, but will also stabilize the networks hash value.From here, the question must be asked: why do so many blockchain projects have the desire to resist ASIC mining hardware? To understand this, we must understand exactly what an ASIC mining machine is.When Satoshi Nakamoto was first developing Bitcoin, in his original vision he hoped that people could use home computers to mine tokens. Specifically, he believed that people would rely merely on their CPUs to validate transactions. However, with the increasing value of Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies, mining has become an industry, leading to increase competitiveness and ultimately, difficulty. Therefore, miners started to purchase and use more advanced hardware, and soon after, companies began appearing with the sole intent of researching, developing and updating specialised hardware to mine tokens that utilise specific algorithms, thus the term ‘application-specific integrated circuit’ miner or ASIC miner slowly grew into the widespread phenomenon it is today.The reason for this was that CPUs overall act as general-purpose processers. This means that while they are great at processing a multitude of different functions, they’re not effective at completing specific individual tasks. An example of this can be seen in graphics computing. In terms of graphics processing and 3D computing, it’s clear that CPUs aren’t as good at doing this as GPUs are, hence the creation and widespread adoption of GPUs.An extension of this are ASIC miners. To mine Bitcoin all a computer needs to do is calculate SHA256 hash values; a singular function. And again, even though a general-purpose CPU can calculate these values, they’re not very effective when considering cost and efficiency. Therefore, mining companies have designed application-specific chips whose primary function is for SHA256 (and other algorithms, depending on the token) calculations. Because it is designed to process a specific algorithm, the design of the ASIC chip is much more simple and less expensive than a CPU; and most importantly, in terms of computing power, they are (generally) tens of thousands or more times higher than currently used CPUs and GPUs.This makes it difficult to mine with normal CPUs and limits the market to those with large amounts of resources to spend on specialised hardware with a singular purpose, and access to cheap power.This usually limited the participation pool to professional mining organizations. This phenomenon has led to the emergence of ‘mining tyrants’, leading to a higher and higher entry barrier for those looking to become a miner, which effectively blocks ordinary users from being involved. This, we believe, is not in line with what blockchain networks were meant to be, and thus, we’ve decided to take a stance against it.The threat of centralization caused by a mining monopolyLast year, the Bitcoin Cash (BCH) Hard Fork battle led to the price of Bitcoin falling to below $6,000 USD overnight, and once to nearly $3,000. This unpredictable price drop added to the cryptocurrency markets instability and volatility.The reason that these fluctuations occurred was that during the hard fork, a battle was being waged by two major miners. In this battle, the computing power that was used to maintain normal operations of the BCH blockchain (via mining pools) were being used for other purposes, thus partially compromising the security of the chain, backlogging the validation and processing of transactions due to the now lack of computational power, and, ultimately sowing the seeds of doubt into users minds regarding the stability, longevity and independence of the network.The most questionable thing that has occurred during this phenomenon is the behaviour of the so called “mining tyrants”, whose actions negatively affect the common interests of all blockchain users. Unless dealt with, blockchain will be no different than any other centralised mechanism.Blockchain has always been viewed as a ‘decentralised’ technology. It’s a technology that was marketed as being more independent, fair and democratic. This technology has a large potential to change the world, especially considering its advancements in ledger technology and widespread appeal. However, if computing power becomes monopolised and ordinary users lose their ability to participate, then it begs the question: Is this new system any better than the last centralised system we moved from? Obviously, the potential of mining monopolies casts a shadow on the entire blockchain industry, and it will inevitably chip away at fundamentalist beliefs of the technology, thus, it must be addressed.The rise of Blockchain monopolies heavily affect network securityMonopolies that may form within a network such as BTC, ETH and others not only have the effect of causing centralisation, but also damage the stability and security of the network.These monopolies, that often take the form of mining pools sometimes employ dubious methods to increase their block rate higher than their computing power ratio. These methods include using ASIC boost, selfish mining, eclipse attacks and other means that enable these pools to conduct a 51% attack without needing to own 51% of the computational power on the network. An example can be seen on the XVG blockchain, where a mining tyrant achieved a 51% attack while only owning 10% of the total computational power on the network.ASIC-resistant mining machines and technological progressionWith what’s already been said above it seems fairly clear that ASIC-resistance should be something that all networks should strive to implement, however, there are some objections to these resistant technologies.Some people consider ASIC machines as part of the natural course of progression relating to advancements in science and technology. Others believe that the advent of ASIC mining machines, which can mine faster and cheaper serve a vital purpose of reducing network costs. The fear within some communities is that as networks move away from mining machines and those machines spawn from technological progression, that means that the networks themselves are shying away from that same technological progression; they’re trying to live against technology.In this regard, we must clarify that ASIC hardware is not technically considered to be a natural step in scientific and/or technological progression. Technological progression would imply that things on a network level are becoming more efficient, but they aren’t. If that were true then the network would be using less electricity, which isn’t the case when it comes to bitcoin for example. When Bitcoin first came out in 2009, Nakamoto used his own home computer to mine 7,200 BTC while using only several kWh’s of electricity per day. Now, tens of thousands of high-performance machines (including ASIC machines) around the world mine around 1,800 BTC while consuming millions of kWh’s of electricity per day. This hardware competition that is ultimately fuelled by ASIC mining machines has led to us consuming more energy than necessary. What’s more is that Bitcoin’s block rate is constant, and the blockchain network throughput is more dependent on the speed of the network, rather than the hardware. Thus, we don’t believe that implementing ASIC resistance means to rally against progression, rather, the opposite.ASIC mining machines have increased barriers to entry, which is not conducive to the popularisation and development of blockchain technologyPreviously, ordinary, household individuals were able to participate in the blockchain industry via mining if they had a computer to mine with, even if they didn’t know much about cryptocurrency or couldn’t afford an ASIC mining machine. What’s more, ASIC mining machines, whose target clients are large mining pools and large net worth individuals, are currently monopolised by a limited number of manufacturers.The value of blockchain itself comes from consensus, and consensus comes from the participation of more and more people. The higher the participation rate, the more popular blockchain will be, and the more popular that blockchain is, the more stable and healthy the price of the cryptocurrency. In other words, the more decentralised the environment, the more fair and secure the industry.It can then be derived that the advantages of high speed mining machines do not in-fact aid the network, but merely line the pockets of their owners with more tokens, as the block rate is unaffected. So, ASIC mining machines do not actually promote the development of a network from a technical point of view; on the contrary, it hinders the participation of ordinary people.Thus, in order to prevent against problems caused by monopolies, many new blockchain projects have abandoned the PoW algorithm and have turned to PoW and DPoS algorithms, such as seen in EOS. However, the governance of EOS super nodes have also been questioned. For example, many people think that their super nodes and cloud servers makes it almost impossible for most ordinary users to participate. If blockchains can be centralised, are they still considered as blockchains in the most fundamental sense?The HC team proposed in our yellow paper that the PoW algorithm has been recognised as the safest and most fair consensus algorithm after ten years of community testing, and as such, it should not be abandoned fully due to the potential of monopolies appearing. Thus, as a compromise, the HC team adopted a PoW+PoS hybrid consensus in its mainchain to maintain security, with the additional features and benefits of the PoS consensus mechanism.The combination of the two creates an excellent consensus algorithm for fostering strengths and avoiding shortcomings. The HC team has been preparing solutions for hidden dangers such as mining tyrants and centralised problems by developing and deploying ASIC-resistant algorithms.In conclusion, ASIC-resistant algorithms are necessary to increase community participation and secure network security. The ultimate goal of ASIC-resistant algorithms for each blockchain project, including HC, is not to resist ASIC mining machines, but to reduce barriers to entry, and to create a distributed PoW ecosystem that is as fair as accessible.To stay up to date with information, or to join our community, check out the following channels:Twitter, Facebook, Reddit, English Telegram, Chinese Telegram, Korean Telegram, Korean Announcements, KakaoTalk, Naver Blog

HyperCash

19. 02. 27

Why go ASIC Resistant?

Since HCASH released its yellow paper in July 2018, the Foundation have been continually reviewing methods of preventing ASIC mining hardware from being deployed, as wide-spread ASIC mining use could effectively create computing power monopolies; a system whereby one or a small number of powerful miners dominate a blockchain network.Today, after half a year of research and development, the HyperCash team are ready to deploy their new ASIC-resistant algorithm.The origins of ASIC mining (and its resistance), and the threat of computing power monopoliesHyperCash is not the only project that has realised the potential harm that could be caused by ASIC mining to communities and network stability.More and more projects are now developing ASIC resistant mining machines.Take Monero for example. When Bitmain released an ASIC mining machine capable of mining Monero and other CryptoNight algorithm tokens, the Monero community became deeply concerned as it quickly became apparent that the computing power of these mining machines would be way higher than any other mining machine currently in use, thus enabling a monopoly to be formed. To counteract this, the Monero community swiftly decided to change their mining algorithm via a hard fork, to one that incorporates ASIC resistance. The hard fork outcome was widely welcomed by Monero miners and community members. Since the fork, the price of the Monero token has risen sharply (indicating its perceived value) and is widely known as a cryptocurrency whereby GPU mining is still attainable and profitable; something that is considered important to those still viewing cryptocurrencies as a ‘tool for the everyman’, and not another outlet for faceless companies to earn profits from. Further efforts to keep this status-quo have been implemented by Monero’s team. The project announced through social media channels that they will revise their current mining algorithm every 6 months to prevent against new ASIC hardware being developed and implemented, and ultimately, threatening the network.Another example is Zcash. Zcash, another cryptocurrency that is resistant to ASIC mining machines have gone so far as to set up a technical advisory committee in charge of providing scientific advice on how to remain ASIC-resistant.Lastly, Ethereum. Just earlier this year, Ethereum’s (ETH) core developers reached a preliminary consensus agreement to implement a new Proof-of-Work (PoW) algorithm that will improve GPU-based efficiency — instead of relying on ASIC-based network mining. It is believed that this approach will not only make ASIC mining more “difficult”, but will also stabilize the networks hash value.From here, the question must be asked: why do so many blockchain projects have the desire to resist ASIC mining hardware? To understand this, we must understand exactly what an ASIC mining machine is.When Satoshi Nakamoto was first developing Bitcoin, in his original vision he hoped that people could use home computers to mine tokens. Specifically, he believed that people would rely merely on their CPUs to validate transactions. However, with the increasing value of Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies, mining has become an industry, leading to increase competitiveness and ultimately, difficulty. Therefore, miners started to purchase and use more advanced hardware, and soon after, companies began appearing with the sole intent of researching, developing and updating specialised hardware to mine tokens that utilise specific algorithms, thus the term ‘application-specific integrated circuit’ miner or ASIC miner slowly grew into the widespread phenomenon it is today.The reason for this was that CPUs overall act as general-purpose processers. This means that while they are great at processing a multitude of different functions, they’re not effective at completing specific individual tasks. An example of this can be seen in graphics computing. In terms of graphics processing and 3D computing, it’s clear that CPUs aren’t as good at doing this as GPUs are, hence the creation and widespread adoption of GPUs.An extension of this are ASIC miners. To mine Bitcoin all a computer needs to do is calculate SHA256 hash values; a singular function. And again, even though a general-purpose CPU can calculate these values, they’re not very effective when considering cost and efficiency. Therefore, mining companies have designed application-specific chips whose primary function is for SHA256 (and other algorithms, depending on the token) calculations. Because it is designed to process a specific algorithm, the design of the ASIC chip is much more simple and less expensive than a CPU; and most importantly, in terms of computing power, they are (generally) tens of thousands or more times higher than currently used CPUs and GPUs.This makes it difficult to mine with normal CPUs and limits the market to those with large amounts of resources to spend on specialised hardware with a singular purpose, and access to cheap power.This usually limited the participation pool to professional mining organizations. This phenomenon has led to the emergence of ‘mining tyrants’, leading to a higher and higher entry barrier for those looking to become a miner, which effectively blocks ordinary users from being involved. This, we believe, is not in line with what blockchain networks were meant to be, and thus, we’ve decided to take a stance against it.The threat of centralization caused by a mining monopolyLast year, the Bitcoin Cash (BCH) Hard Fork battle led to the price of Bitcoin falling to below $6,000 USD overnight, and once to nearly $3,000. This unpredictable price drop added to the cryptocurrency markets instability and volatility.The reason that these fluctuations occurred was that during the hard fork, a battle was being waged by two major miners. In this battle, the computing power that was used to maintain normal operations of the BCH blockchain (via mining pools) were being used for other purposes, thus partially compromising the security of the chain, backlogging the validation and processing of transactions due to the now lack of computational power, and, ultimately sowing the seeds of doubt into users minds regarding the stability, longevity and independence of the network.The most questionable thing that has occurred during this phenomenon is the behaviour of the so called “mining tyrants”, whose actions negatively affect the common interests of all blockchain users. Unless dealt with, blockchain will be no different than any other centralised mechanism.Blockchain has always been viewed as a ‘decentralised’ technology. It’s a technology that was marketed as being more independent, fair and democratic. This technology has a large potential to change the world, especially considering its advancements in ledger technology and widespread appeal. However, if computing power becomes monopolised and ordinary users lose their ability to participate, then it begs the question: Is this new system any better than the last centralised system we moved from? Obviously, the potential of mining monopolies casts a shadow on the entire blockchain industry, and it will inevitably chip away at fundamentalist beliefs of the technology, thus, it must be addressed.The rise of Blockchain monopolies heavily affect network securityMonopolies that may form within a network such as BTC, ETH and others not only have the effect of causing centralisation, but also damage the stability and security of the network.These monopolies, that often take the form of mining pools sometimes employ dubious methods to increase their block rate higher than their computing power ratio. These methods include using ASIC boost, selfish mining, eclipse attacks and other means that enable these pools to conduct a 51% attack without needing to own 51% of the computational power on the network. An example can be seen on the XVG blockchain, where a mining tyrant achieved a 51% attack while only owning 10% of the total computational power on the network.ASIC-resistant mining machines and technological progressionWith what’s already been said above it seems fairly clear that ASIC-resistance should be something that all networks should strive to implement, however, there are some objections to these resistant technologies.Some people consider ASIC machines as part of the natural course of progression relating to advancements in science and technology. Others believe that the advent of ASIC mining machines, which can mine faster and cheaper serve a vital purpose of reducing network costs. The fear within some communities is that as networks move away from mining machines and those machines spawn from technological progression, that means that the networks themselves are shying away from that same technological progression; they’re trying to live against technology.In this regard, we must clarify that ASIC hardware is not technically considered to be a natural step in scientific and/or technological progression. Technological progression would imply that things on a network level are becoming more efficient, but they aren’t. If that were true then the network would be using less electricity, which isn’t the case when it comes to bitcoin for example. When Bitcoin first came out in 2009, Nakamoto used his own home computer to mine 7,200 BTC while using only several kWh’s of electricity per day. Now, tens of thousands of high-performance machines (including ASIC machines) around the world mine around 1,800 BTC while consuming millions of kWh’s of electricity per day. This hardware competition that is ultimately fuelled by ASIC mining machines has led to us consuming more energy than necessary. What’s more is that Bitcoin’s block rate is constant, and the blockchain network throughput is more dependent on the speed of the network, rather than the hardware. Thus, we don’t believe that implementing ASIC resistance means to rally against progression, rather, the opposite.ASIC mining machines have increased barriers to entry, which is not conducive to the popularisation and development of blockchain technologyPreviously, ordinary, household individuals were able to participate in the blockchain industry via mining if they had a computer to mine with, even if they didn’t know much about cryptocurrency or couldn’t afford an ASIC mining machine. What’s more, ASIC mining machines, whose target clients are large mining pools and large net worth individuals, are currently monopolised by a limited number of manufacturers.The value of blockchain itself comes from consensus, and consensus comes from the participation of more and more people. The higher the participation rate, the more popular blockchain will be, and the more popular that blockchain is, the more stable and healthy the price of the cryptocurrency. In other words, the more decentralised the environment, the more fair and secure the industry.It can then be derived that the advantages of high speed mining machines do not in-fact aid the network, but merely line the pockets of their owners with more tokens, as the block rate is unaffected. So, ASIC mining machines do not actually promote the development of a network from a technical point of view; on the contrary, it hinders the participation of ordinary people.Thus, in order to prevent against problems caused by monopolies, many new blockchain projects have abandoned the PoW algorithm and have turned to PoW and DPoS algorithms, such as seen in EOS. However, the governance of EOS super nodes have also been questioned. For example, many people think that their super nodes and cloud servers makes it almost impossible for most ordinary users to participate. If blockchains can be centralised, are they still considered as blockchains in the most fundamental sense?The HC team proposed in our yellow paper that the PoW algorithm has been recognised as the safest and most fair consensus algorithm after ten years of community testing, and as such, it should not be abandoned fully due to the potential of monopolies appearing. Thus, as a compromise, the HC team adopted a PoW+PoS hybrid consensus in its mainchain to maintain security, with the additional features and benefits of the PoS consensus mechanism.The combination of the two creates an excellent consensus algorithm for fostering strengths and avoiding shortcomings. The HC team has been preparing solutions for hidden dangers such as mining tyrants and centralised problems by developing and deploying ASIC-resistant algorithms.In conclusion, ASIC-resistant algorithms are necessary to increase community participation and secure network security. The ultimate goal of ASIC-resistant algorithms for each blockchain project, including HC, is not to resist ASIC mining machines, but to reduce barriers to entry, and to create a distributed PoW ecosystem that is as fair as accessible.To stay up to date with information, or to join our community, check out the following channels:Twitter, Facebook, Reddit, English Telegram, Chinese Telegram, Korean Telegram, Korean Announcements, KakaoTalk, Naver Blog

HyperCash

19. 02. 27

Why go ASIC Resistant?

Since HCASH released its yellow paper in July 2018, the Foundation have been continually reviewing methods of preventing ASIC mining hardware from being deployed, as wide-spread ASIC mining use could effectively create computing power monopolies; a system whereby one or a small number of powerful miners dominate a blockchain network.Today, after half a year of research and development, the HyperCash team are ready to deploy their new ASIC-resistant algorithm.The origins of ASIC mining (and its resistance), and the threat of computing power monopoliesHyperCash is not the only project that has realised the potential harm that could be caused by ASIC mining to communities and network stability.More and more projects are now developing ASIC resistant mining machines.Take Monero for example. When Bitmain released an ASIC mining machine capable of mining Monero and other CryptoNight algorithm tokens, the Monero community became deeply concerned as it quickly became apparent that the computing power of these mining machines would be way higher than any other mining machine currently in use, thus enabling a monopoly to be formed. To counteract this, the Monero community swiftly decided to change their mining algorithm via a hard fork, to one that incorporates ASIC resistance. The hard fork outcome was widely welcomed by Monero miners and community members. Since the fork, the price of the Monero token has risen sharply (indicating its perceived value) and is widely known as a cryptocurrency whereby GPU mining is still attainable and profitable; something that is considered important to those still viewing cryptocurrencies as a ‘tool for the everyman’, and not another outlet for faceless companies to earn profits from. Further efforts to keep this status-quo have been implemented by Monero’s team. The project announced through social media channels that they will revise their current mining algorithm every 6 months to prevent against new ASIC hardware being developed and implemented, and ultimately, threatening the network.Another example is Zcash. Zcash, another cryptocurrency that is resistant to ASIC mining machines have gone so far as to set up a technical advisory committee in charge of providing scientific advice on how to remain ASIC-resistant.Lastly, Ethereum. Just earlier this year, Ethereum’s (ETH) core developers reached a preliminary consensus agreement to implement a new Proof-of-Work (PoW) algorithm that will improve GPU-based efficiency — instead of relying on ASIC-based network mining. It is believed that this approach will not only make ASIC mining more “difficult”, but will also stabilize the networks hash value.From here, the question must be asked: why do so many blockchain projects have the desire to resist ASIC mining hardware? To understand this, we must understand exactly what an ASIC mining machine is.When Satoshi Nakamoto was first developing Bitcoin, in his original vision he hoped that people could use home computers to mine tokens. Specifically, he believed that people would rely merely on their CPUs to validate transactions. However, with the increasing value of Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies, mining has become an industry, leading to increase competitiveness and ultimately, difficulty. Therefore, miners started to purchase and use more advanced hardware, and soon after, companies began appearing with the sole intent of researching, developing and updating specialised hardware to mine tokens that utilise specific algorithms, thus the term ‘application-specific integrated circuit’ miner or ASIC miner slowly grew into the widespread phenomenon it is today.The reason for this was that CPUs overall act as general-purpose processers. This means that while they are great at processing a multitude of different functions, they’re not effective at completing specific individual tasks. An example of this can be seen in graphics computing. In terms of graphics processing and 3D computing, it’s clear that CPUs aren’t as good at doing this as GPUs are, hence the creation and widespread adoption of GPUs.An extension of this are ASIC miners. To mine Bitcoin all a computer needs to do is calculate SHA256 hash values; a singular function. And again, even though a general-purpose CPU can calculate these values, they’re not very effective when considering cost and efficiency. Therefore, mining companies have designed application-specific chips whose primary function is for SHA256 (and other algorithms, depending on the token) calculations. Because it is designed to process a specific algorithm, the design of the ASIC chip is much more simple and less expensive than a CPU; and most importantly, in terms of computing power, they are (generally) tens of thousands or more times higher than currently used CPUs and GPUs.This makes it difficult to mine with normal CPUs and limits the market to those with large amounts of resources to spend on specialised hardware with a singular purpose, and access to cheap power.This usually limited the participation pool to professional mining organizations. This phenomenon has led to the emergence of ‘mining tyrants’, leading to a higher and higher entry barrier for those looking to become a miner, which effectively blocks ordinary users from being involved. This, we believe, is not in line with what blockchain networks were meant to be, and thus, we’ve decided to take a stance against it.The threat of centralization caused by a mining monopolyLast year, the Bitcoin Cash (BCH) Hard Fork battle led to the price of Bitcoin falling to below $6,000 USD overnight, and once to nearly $3,000. This unpredictable price drop added to the cryptocurrency markets instability and volatility.The reason that these fluctuations occurred was that during the hard fork, a battle was being waged by two major miners. In this battle, the computing power that was used to maintain normal operations of the BCH blockchain (via mining pools) were being used for other purposes, thus partially compromising the security of the chain, backlogging the validation and processing of transactions due to the now lack of computational power, and, ultimately sowing the seeds of doubt into users minds regarding the stability, longevity and independence of the network.The most questionable thing that has occurred during this phenomenon is the behaviour of the so called “mining tyrants”, whose actions negatively affect the common interests of all blockchain users. Unless dealt with, blockchain will be no different than any other centralised mechanism.Blockchain has always been viewed as a ‘decentralised’ technology. It’s a technology that was marketed as being more independent, fair and democratic. This technology has a large potential to change the world, especially considering its advancements in ledger technology and widespread appeal. However, if computing power becomes monopolised and ordinary users lose their ability to participate, then it begs the question: Is this new system any better than the last centralised system we moved from? Obviously, the potential of mining monopolies casts a shadow on the entire blockchain industry, and it will inevitably chip away at fundamentalist beliefs of the technology, thus, it must be addressed.The rise of Blockchain monopolies heavily affect network securityMonopolies that may form within a network such as BTC, ETH and others not only have the effect of causing centralisation, but also damage the stability and security of the network.These monopolies, that often take the form of mining pools sometimes employ dubious methods to increase their block rate higher than their computing power ratio. These methods include using ASIC boost, selfish mining, eclipse attacks and other means that enable these pools to conduct a 51% attack without needing to own 51% of the computational power on the network. An example can be seen on the XVG blockchain, where a mining tyrant achieved a 51% attack while only owning 10% of the total computational power on the network.ASIC-resistant mining machines and technological progressionWith what’s already been said above it seems fairly clear that ASIC-resistance should be something that all networks should strive to implement, however, there are some objections to these resistant technologies.Some people consider ASIC machines as part of the natural course of progression relating to advancements in science and technology. Others believe that the advent of ASIC mining machines, which can mine faster and cheaper serve a vital purpose of reducing network costs. The fear within some communities is that as networks move away from mining machines and those machines spawn from technological progression, that means that the networks themselves are shying away from that same technological progression; they’re trying to live against technology.In this regard, we must clarify that ASIC hardware is not technically considered to be a natural step in scientific and/or technological progression. Technological progression would imply that things on a network level are becoming more efficient, but they aren’t. If that were true then the network would be using less electricity, which isn’t the case when it comes to bitcoin for example. When Bitcoin first came out in 2009, Nakamoto used his own home computer to mine 7,200 BTC while using only several kWh’s of electricity per day. Now, tens of thousands of high-performance machines (including ASIC machines) around the world mine around 1,800 BTC while consuming millions of kWh’s of electricity per day. This hardware competition that is ultimately fuelled by ASIC mining machines has led to us consuming more energy than necessary. What’s more is that Bitcoin’s block rate is constant, and the blockchain network throughput is more dependent on the speed of the network, rather than the hardware. Thus, we don’t believe that implementing ASIC resistance means to rally against progression, rather, the opposite.ASIC mining machines have increased barriers to entry, which is not conducive to the popularisation and development of blockchain technologyPreviously, ordinary, household individuals were able to participate in the blockchain industry via mining if they had a computer to mine with, even if they didn’t know much about cryptocurrency or couldn’t afford an ASIC mining machine. What’s more, ASIC mining machines, whose target clients are large mining pools and large net worth individuals, are currently monopolised by a limited number of manufacturers.The value of blockchain itself comes from consensus, and consensus comes from the participation of more and more people. The higher the participation rate, the more popular blockchain will be, and the more popular that blockchain is, the more stable and healthy the price of the cryptocurrency. In other words, the more decentralised the environment, the more fair and secure the industry.It can then be derived that the advantages of high speed mining machines do not in-fact aid the network, but merely line the pockets of their owners with more tokens, as the block rate is unaffected. So, ASIC mining machines do not actually promote the development of a network from a technical point of view; on the contrary, it hinders the participation of ordinary people.Thus, in order to prevent against problems caused by monopolies, many new blockchain projects have abandoned the PoW algorithm and have turned to PoW and DPoS algorithms, such as seen in EOS. However, the governance of EOS super nodes have also been questioned. For example, many people think that their super nodes and cloud servers makes it almost impossible for most ordinary users to participate. If blockchains can be centralised, are they still considered as blockchains in the most fundamental sense?The HC team proposed in our yellow paper that the PoW algorithm has been recognised as the safest and most fair consensus algorithm after ten years of community testing, and as such, it should not be abandoned fully due to the potential of monopolies appearing. Thus, as a compromise, the HC team adopted a PoW+PoS hybrid consensus in its mainchain to maintain security, with the additional features and benefits of the PoS consensus mechanism.The combination of the two creates an excellent consensus algorithm for fostering strengths and avoiding shortcomings. The HC team has been preparing solutions for hidden dangers such as mining tyrants and centralised problems by developing and deploying ASIC-resistant algorithms.In conclusion, ASIC-resistant algorithms are necessary to increase community participation and secure network security. The ultimate goal of ASIC-resistant algorithms for each blockchain project, including HC, is not to resist ASIC mining machines, but to reduce barriers to entry, and to create a distributed PoW ecosystem that is as fair as accessible.To stay up to date with information, or to join our community, check out the following channels:Twitter, Facebook, Reddit, English Telegram, Chinese Telegram, Korean Telegram, Korean Announcements, KakaoTalk, Naver Blog

HyperCash

19. 02. 27

Weekly Development Update

15–21 Feb 2019The following is a weekly progress report from the HCASH development team. This report is divided in two parts: completed and ongoing work.Our GitHub code can be found here: www.github.com/HcashOrgPlease note: code is being uploaded to GitHub progressively; if you find that something from this document is missing from a repository, please check back periodically.Completed work:HyperCash/HChcGUIIncreased block rescanning speedHyperExchange/HXHX coreDeveloped customised multi-signature API for SenatorsAdded USDT assetHX IndicatorAdded order history to HX Exchange pageOptimised lock-in contractAdded USDT assetHX IDEAdapted new debugging return data formatHX ToolsConducted tests for HX Exchange market data collection and query interface code developmentOngoing work:HyperCash/HCHcdAdjust and develop mainnet parametersDevelop getinfo and getblock functionality on ASIC resistant mining algorithmHcwalletDevelopment on block validation on ASIC resistant mining algorithmTechnical supportConduct DApp researchHcAutonomyPrepare for new proposalsHyperExchange/HXHX coreAdd K line feature to HX Exchange pageImplement special account for deposits and transactionsOptimise HX contract storage performanceHX IndicatorAdd K line featureHX IDEAdd TcpListener and data acquisition channel to UVM and debugger separationCompile debugger on macOS systemsHX ToolsDevelop HX Exchange commission inquiry HTML5 pageDevelop HX Exchange HTML5 home pageConduct tests on HX peripheral toolsWe are grateful for the immense effort made by all contributors. Each contributor and community member is vital to the technical development of the HCASH ecosystem.To stay up to date with information, or to join our community, check out the following channels:Twitter, Facebook, Reddit, English Telegram, Chinese Telegram, Korean Telegram, Korean Announcements, KakaoTalk, Naver Blog

HyperCash

19. 02. 22

Weekly Development Update

15–21 Feb 2019The following is a weekly progress report from the HCASH development team. This report is divided in two parts: completed and ongoing work.Our GitHub code can be found here: www.github.com/HcashOrgPlease note: code is being uploaded to GitHub progressively; if you find that something from this document is missing from a repository, please check back periodically.Completed work:HyperCash/HChcGUIIncreased block rescanning speedHyperExchange/HXHX coreDeveloped customised multi-signature API for SenatorsAdded USDT assetHX IndicatorAdded order history to HX Exchange pageOptimised lock-in contractAdded USDT assetHX IDEAdapted new debugging return data formatHX ToolsConducted tests for HX Exchange market data collection and query interface code developmentOngoing work:HyperCash/HCHcdAdjust and develop mainnet parametersDevelop getinfo and getblock functionality on ASIC resistant mining algorithmHcwalletDevelopment on block validation on ASIC resistant mining algorithmTechnical supportConduct DApp researchHcAutonomyPrepare for new proposalsHyperExchange/HXHX coreAdd K line feature to HX Exchange pageImplement special account for deposits and transactionsOptimise HX contract storage performanceHX IndicatorAdd K line featureHX IDEAdd TcpListener and data acquisition channel to UVM and debugger separationCompile debugger on macOS systemsHX ToolsDevelop HX Exchange commission inquiry HTML5 pageDevelop HX Exchange HTML5 home pageConduct tests on HX peripheral toolsWe are grateful for the immense effort made by all contributors. Each contributor and community member is vital to the technical development of the HCASH ecosystem.To stay up to date with information, or to join our community, check out the following channels:Twitter, Facebook, Reddit, English Telegram, Chinese Telegram, Korean Telegram, Korean Announcements, KakaoTalk, Naver Blog

HyperCash

19. 02. 22

Weekly Development Update

15–21 Feb 2019The following is a weekly progress report from the HCASH development team. This report is divided in two parts: completed and ongoing work.Our GitHub code can be found here: www.github.com/HcashOrgPlease note: code is being uploaded to GitHub progressively; if you find that something from this document is missing from a repository, please check back periodically.Completed work:HyperCash/HChcGUIIncreased block rescanning speedHyperExchange/HXHX coreDeveloped customised multi-signature API for SenatorsAdded USDT assetHX IndicatorAdded order history to HX Exchange pageOptimised lock-in contractAdded USDT assetHX IDEAdapted new debugging return data formatHX ToolsConducted tests for HX Exchange market data collection and query interface code developmentOngoing work:HyperCash/HCHcdAdjust and develop mainnet parametersDevelop getinfo and getblock functionality on ASIC resistant mining algorithmHcwalletDevelopment on block validation on ASIC resistant mining algorithmTechnical supportConduct DApp researchHcAutonomyPrepare for new proposalsHyperExchange/HXHX coreAdd K line feature to HX Exchange pageImplement special account for deposits and transactionsOptimise HX contract storage performanceHX IndicatorAdd K line featureHX IDEAdd TcpListener and data acquisition channel to UVM and debugger separationCompile debugger on macOS systemsHX ToolsDevelop HX Exchange commission inquiry HTML5 pageDevelop HX Exchange HTML5 home pageConduct tests on HX peripheral toolsWe are grateful for the immense effort made by all contributors. Each contributor and community member is vital to the technical development of the HCASH ecosystem.To stay up to date with information, or to join our community, check out the following channels:Twitter, Facebook, Reddit, English Telegram, Chinese Telegram, Korean Telegram, Korean Announcements, KakaoTalk, Naver Blog

HyperCash

19. 02. 22

Weekly Development Update

15–21 Feb 2019The following is a weekly progress report from the HCASH development team. This report is divided in two parts: completed and ongoing work.Our GitHub code can be found here: www.github.com/HcashOrgPlease note: code is being uploaded to GitHub progressively; if you find that something from this document is missing from a repository, please check back periodically.Completed work:HyperCash/HChcGUIIncreased block rescanning speedHyperExchange/HXHX coreDeveloped customised multi-signature API for SenatorsAdded USDT assetHX IndicatorAdded order history to HX Exchange pageOptimised lock-in contractAdded USDT assetHX IDEAdapted new debugging return data formatHX ToolsConducted tests for HX Exchange market data collection and query interface code developmentOngoing work:HyperCash/HCHcdAdjust and develop mainnet parametersDevelop getinfo and getblock functionality on ASIC resistant mining algorithmHcwalletDevelopment on block validation on ASIC resistant mining algorithmTechnical supportConduct DApp researchHcAutonomyPrepare for new proposalsHyperExchange/HXHX coreAdd K line feature to HX Exchange pageImplement special account for deposits and transactionsOptimise HX contract storage performanceHX IndicatorAdd K line featureHX IDEAdd TcpListener and data acquisition channel to UVM and debugger separationCompile debugger on macOS systemsHX ToolsDevelop HX Exchange commission inquiry HTML5 pageDevelop HX Exchange HTML5 home pageConduct tests on HX peripheral toolsWe are grateful for the immense effort made by all contributors. Each contributor and community member is vital to the technical development of the HCASH ecosystem.To stay up to date with information, or to join our community, check out the following channels:Twitter, Facebook, Reddit, English Telegram, Chinese Telegram, Korean Telegram, Korean Announcements, KakaoTalk, Naver Blog

HyperCash

19. 02. 22

Weekly Development Update

08 — 14 Feb 2019The following is a weekly progress report from the HCASH development team. This report is divided in two parts: completed and ongoing work.Our GitHub code can be found here: www.github.com/HcashOrgPlease note: code is being uploaded to GitHub progressively; if you find that something from this document is missing from a repository, please check back periodically.Completed work:HyperCash/HCHcdDevelopment on ASIC resistant mining algorithm:— Block processing logic— Difficulty level adjustment algorithmExchangesCompleted HSR to HC swap for BitpieTechnical supportSupported community members in completing HSR to HC swapHyperExchange/HXHX coreTested USDT integrationHX IndicatorCompleted MD5 check for node clientOptimised transaction status display of failed transactions to contract addressAdded Citizen proposer name to proposal displayHX IDEModified data format for debugger and IDE interactionsModified data sending API on debuggerHX ToolsHX Exchange market data collection and query interface code developmentData collection and query interface tests for HX Exchange K line developmentOngoing work:HyperCash/HCHcdDevelopment on ASIC resistant mining algorithm:— develop getinfo and getblock functionalityHcwalletDevelopment on block validation on ASIC resistant mining algorithmhcGUIIncrease rescan speedTechnical supportConduct research for DApp developmentHcAutonomyPrepare for new proposalsHyperExchange/HXHX coreAdd K line feature to HX Exchange pageDevelop customised multi-signature API for SenatorsHX IndicatorAdd order history to HX Exchange pageFix several bugsHX IDEFix bugs that occur after debugger API is modifiedCompile debugger on macOS systemsHX ToolsConduct tests for HX Exchange market data collection and query interface code developmentConduct research for HX Exchange developmentConduct tests on HX peripheral toolsWe are grateful for the immense effort made by all contributors. Each contributor and community member is vital to the technical development of the HCASH ecosystem.To stay up to date with information, or to join our community, check out the following channels:Twitter, Facebook, Reddit, English Telegram, Chinese Telegram, Korean Telegram, Korean Announcements, KakaoTalk, Naver Blog

HyperCash

19. 02. 15

Weekly Development Update

08 — 14 Feb 2019The following is a weekly progress report from the HCASH development team. This report is divided in two parts: completed and ongoing work.Our GitHub code can be found here: www.github.com/HcashOrgPlease note: code is being uploaded to GitHub progressively; if you find that something from this document is missing from a repository, please check back periodically.Completed work:HyperCash/HCHcdDevelopment on ASIC resistant mining algorithm:— Block processing logic— Difficulty level adjustment algorithmExchangesCompleted HSR to HC swap for BitpieTechnical supportSupported community members in completing HSR to HC swapHyperExchange/HXHX coreTested USDT integrationHX IndicatorCompleted MD5 check for node clientOptimised transaction status display of failed transactions to contract addressAdded Citizen proposer name to proposal displayHX IDEModified data format for debugger and IDE interactionsModified data sending API on debuggerHX ToolsHX Exchange market data collection and query interface code developmentData collection and query interface tests for HX Exchange K line developmentOngoing work:HyperCash/HCHcdDevelopment on ASIC resistant mining algorithm:— develop getinfo and getblock functionalityHcwalletDevelopment on block validation on ASIC resistant mining algorithmhcGUIIncrease rescan speedTechnical supportConduct research for DApp developmentHcAutonomyPrepare for new proposalsHyperExchange/HXHX coreAdd K line feature to HX Exchange pageDevelop customised multi-signature API for SenatorsHX IndicatorAdd order history to HX Exchange pageFix several bugsHX IDEFix bugs that occur after debugger API is modifiedCompile debugger on macOS systemsHX ToolsConduct tests for HX Exchange market data collection and query interface code developmentConduct research for HX Exchange developmentConduct tests on HX peripheral toolsWe are grateful for the immense effort made by all contributors. Each contributor and community member is vital to the technical development of the HCASH ecosystem.To stay up to date with information, or to join our community, check out the following channels:Twitter, Facebook, Reddit, English Telegram, Chinese Telegram, Korean Telegram, Korean Announcements, KakaoTalk, Naver Blog

HyperCash

19. 02. 15

Weekly Development Update

08 — 14 Feb 2019The following is a weekly progress report from the HCASH development team. This report is divided in two parts: completed and ongoing work.Our GitHub code can be found here: www.github.com/HcashOrgPlease note: code is being uploaded to GitHub progressively; if you find that something from this document is missing from a repository, please check back periodically.Completed work:HyperCash/HCHcdDevelopment on ASIC resistant mining algorithm:— Block processing logic— Difficulty level adjustment algorithmExchangesCompleted HSR to HC swap for BitpieTechnical supportSupported community members in completing HSR to HC swapHyperExchange/HXHX coreTested USDT integrationHX IndicatorCompleted MD5 check for node clientOptimised transaction status display of failed transactions to contract addressAdded Citizen proposer name to proposal displayHX IDEModified data format for debugger and IDE interactionsModified data sending API on debuggerHX ToolsHX Exchange market data collection and query interface code developmentData collection and query interface tests for HX Exchange K line developmentOngoing work:HyperCash/HCHcdDevelopment on ASIC resistant mining algorithm:— develop getinfo and getblock functionalityHcwalletDevelopment on block validation on ASIC resistant mining algorithmhcGUIIncrease rescan speedTechnical supportConduct research for DApp developmentHcAutonomyPrepare for new proposalsHyperExchange/HXHX coreAdd K line feature to HX Exchange pageDevelop customised multi-signature API for SenatorsHX IndicatorAdd order history to HX Exchange pageFix several bugsHX IDEFix bugs that occur after debugger API is modifiedCompile debugger on macOS systemsHX ToolsConduct tests for HX Exchange market data collection and query interface code developmentConduct research for HX Exchange developmentConduct tests on HX peripheral toolsWe are grateful for the immense effort made by all contributors. Each contributor and community member is vital to the technical development of the HCASH ecosystem.To stay up to date with information, or to join our community, check out the following channels:Twitter, Facebook, Reddit, English Telegram, Chinese Telegram, Korean Telegram, Korean Announcements, KakaoTalk, Naver Blog

HyperCash

19. 02. 15

Weekly Development Update

08 — 14 Feb 2019The following is a weekly progress report from the HCASH development team. This report is divided in two parts: completed and ongoing work.Our GitHub code can be found here: www.github.com/HcashOrgPlease note: code is being uploaded to GitHub progressively; if you find that something from this document is missing from a repository, please check back periodically.Completed work:HyperCash/HCHcdDevelopment on ASIC resistant mining algorithm:— Block processing logic— Difficulty level adjustment algorithmExchangesCompleted HSR to HC swap for BitpieTechnical supportSupported community members in completing HSR to HC swapHyperExchange/HXHX coreTested USDT integrationHX IndicatorCompleted MD5 check for node clientOptimised transaction status display of failed transactions to contract addressAdded Citizen proposer name to proposal displayHX IDEModified data format for debugger and IDE interactionsModified data sending API on debuggerHX ToolsHX Exchange market data collection and query interface code developmentData collection and query interface tests for HX Exchange K line developmentOngoing work:HyperCash/HCHcdDevelopment on ASIC resistant mining algorithm:— develop getinfo and getblock functionalityHcwalletDevelopment on block validation on ASIC resistant mining algorithmhcGUIIncrease rescan speedTechnical supportConduct research for DApp developmentHcAutonomyPrepare for new proposalsHyperExchange/HXHX coreAdd K line feature to HX Exchange pageDevelop customised multi-signature API for SenatorsHX IndicatorAdd order history to HX Exchange pageFix several bugsHX IDEFix bugs that occur after debugger API is modifiedCompile debugger on macOS systemsHX ToolsConduct tests for HX Exchange market data collection and query interface code developmentConduct research for HX Exchange developmentConduct tests on HX peripheral toolsWe are grateful for the immense effort made by all contributors. Each contributor and community member is vital to the technical development of the HCASH ecosystem.To stay up to date with information, or to join our community, check out the following channels:Twitter, Facebook, Reddit, English Telegram, Chinese Telegram, Korean Telegram, Korean Announcements, KakaoTalk, Naver Blog

HyperCash

19. 02. 15

HyperCash completed Post-Qu...

The HyperCash development team has completed the Post-Quantum Linkable Ring Signature code development and is entering the deployment testing phase. This algorism is based on the HCASH Chief Scientist Dr Joseph Liu ‘s publication “Post-Quantum One-Time Linkable Ring Signature and Application to Ring Confidential Transactions in Blockchain” published on IACR(International Association for Cryptologic Research).In this version, we present a lattice-based post-quantum secure Ring CT protocol, that supports multi-input-multi-output transactions. It is a comprehensive Ring CT protocol such that it contains all necessary parts including linkable ring signature (for user anonymity), commitment scheme (for hiding transaction amount) and range proof (to ensure the hidden value is a positive amount). All parts are in a lattice-based setting, meaning that the overall protocol is post-quantum secure.Now HyperCash will be the world’s first cryptocurrency to implement Post-quantum Ring Signature algorithms.Journal: https://eprint.iacr.org/2018/379.pdfPlease keep an eye on HCASH announcement channels for updates regarding the HyperCash Post-Quantum Linkable Ring Signature, and more. We hope you will enjoy the launch of our new function and we appreciate your support.We are grateful for the immense effort made by all contributors. Each contributor and community member is vital to the technical development of HCASH.For more information regarding Hcash, check out the following channels:Twitter, Facebook, Reddit, English Telegram, Chinese Telegram, Korean Telegram, Korean Announcements, KakaoTalk, Naver Blog

HyperCash

19. 02. 08

HyperCash completed Post-Qu...

The HyperCash development team has completed the Post-Quantum Linkable Ring Signature code development and is entering the deployment testing phase. This algorism is based on the HCASH Chief Scientist Dr Joseph Liu ‘s publication “Post-Quantum One-Time Linkable Ring Signature and Application to Ring Confidential Transactions in Blockchain” published on IACR(International Association for Cryptologic Research).In this version, we present a lattice-based post-quantum secure Ring CT protocol, that supports multi-input-multi-output transactions. It is a comprehensive Ring CT protocol such that it contains all necessary parts including linkable ring signature (for user anonymity), commitment scheme (for hiding transaction amount) and range proof (to ensure the hidden value is a positive amount). All parts are in a lattice-based setting, meaning that the overall protocol is post-quantum secure.Now HyperCash will be the world’s first cryptocurrency to implement Post-quantum Ring Signature algorithms.Journal: https://eprint.iacr.org/2018/379.pdfPlease keep an eye on HCASH announcement channels for updates regarding the HyperCash Post-Quantum Linkable Ring Signature, and more. We hope you will enjoy the launch of our new function and we appreciate your support.We are grateful for the immense effort made by all contributors. Each contributor and community member is vital to the technical development of HCASH.For more information regarding Hcash, check out the following channels:Twitter, Facebook, Reddit, English Telegram, Chinese Telegram, Korean Telegram, Korean Announcements, KakaoTalk, Naver Blog

HyperCash

19. 02. 08

HyperCash completed Post-Qu...

The HyperCash development team has completed the Post-Quantum Linkable Ring Signature code development and is entering the deployment testing phase. This algorism is based on the HCASH Chief Scientist Dr Joseph Liu ‘s publication “Post-Quantum One-Time Linkable Ring Signature and Application to Ring Confidential Transactions in Blockchain” published on IACR(International Association for Cryptologic Research).In this version, we present a lattice-based post-quantum secure Ring CT protocol, that supports multi-input-multi-output transactions. It is a comprehensive Ring CT protocol such that it contains all necessary parts including linkable ring signature (for user anonymity), commitment scheme (for hiding transaction amount) and range proof (to ensure the hidden value is a positive amount). All parts are in a lattice-based setting, meaning that the overall protocol is post-quantum secure.Now HyperCash will be the world’s first cryptocurrency to implement Post-quantum Ring Signature algorithms.Journal: https://eprint.iacr.org/2018/379.pdfPlease keep an eye on HCASH announcement channels for updates regarding the HyperCash Post-Quantum Linkable Ring Signature, and more. We hope you will enjoy the launch of our new function and we appreciate your support.We are grateful for the immense effort made by all contributors. Each contributor and community member is vital to the technical development of HCASH.For more information regarding Hcash, check out the following channels:Twitter, Facebook, Reddit, English Telegram, Chinese Telegram, Korean Telegram, Korean Announcements, KakaoTalk, Naver Blog

HyperCash

19. 02. 08

Weekly Development Update

1–7 February 2019The following is a weekly progress report from the HCASH development team. This report is divided in two parts: completed and ongoing work.Our GitHub code can be found here: www.github.com/HcashOrgPlease note: code is being uploaded to GitHub progressively; if you find that something from this document is missing from a repository, please check back periodically.Completed work:HyperCash/HCHcdCompleted technical evaluation of ASIC resistant mining algorithmhcExplorerAdded block generation monitoring functionalityExchangesCompleted HSR to HC swap for BitpieTechnical supportSupported community members to complete HSR to HC swapHcAutonomyCompleted testing on mainnet proposalHyperExchange/HXHX coreHX middleware network optimizationHX IndicatorHX token lock contract functionExchange order book recordingHX IDEOptimized IDE contract templateHX ToolsWorkshop on hx order matching page displayOngoing work:Hypercash/HCHcdDevelopment on ASIC resistant mining algorithm: — Block processing logic — getinfo and getblock functionality — difficulty level adjustment algorithmHcwalletDevelopment on block validation on ASIC resistant mining algorithmTechnical supportSupporting community members to complete HSR to HC swapHyperExchange/HXHX coreHX exchange K line data processingTesting on merging HC crosschain withdrawal requestsHX senator election processHX IndicatorFurther optimization on UI elementsTesting and bug fixingHX IDEModify IDE data interaction APICompile MAC version of the IDEHX ToolsTesting on auxiliary toolsWe are grateful for the immense effort made by all contributors. Each contributor and community member is vital to the technical development of the HCASH ecosystem.To stay up to date with information, or to join our community, check out the following channels:Twitter, Facebook, Reddit, English Telegram, Chinese Telegram, Korean Telegram, Korean Announcements, KakaoTalk, Naver Blog

HyperCash

19. 02. 08

Weekly Development Update

1–7 February 2019The following is a weekly progress report from the HCASH development team. This report is divided in two parts: completed and ongoing work.Our GitHub code can be found here: www.github.com/HcashOrgPlease note: code is being uploaded to GitHub progressively; if you find that something from this document is missing from a repository, please check back periodically.Completed work:HyperCash/HCHcdCompleted technical evaluation of ASIC resistant mining algorithmhcExplorerAdded block generation monitoring functionalityExchangesCompleted HSR to HC swap for BitpieTechnical supportSupported community members to complete HSR to HC swapHcAutonomyCompleted testing on mainnet proposalHyperExchange/HXHX coreHX middleware network optimizationHX IndicatorHX token lock contract functionExchange order book recordingHX IDEOptimized IDE contract templateHX ToolsWorkshop on hx order matching page displayOngoing work:Hypercash/HCHcdDevelopment on ASIC resistant mining algorithm: — Block processing logic — getinfo and getblock functionality — difficulty level adjustment algorithmHcwalletDevelopment on block validation on ASIC resistant mining algorithmTechnical supportSupporting community members to complete HSR to HC swapHyperExchange/HXHX coreHX exchange K line data processingTesting on merging HC crosschain withdrawal requestsHX senator election processHX IndicatorFurther optimization on UI elementsTesting and bug fixingHX IDEModify IDE data interaction APICompile MAC version of the IDEHX ToolsTesting on auxiliary toolsWe are grateful for the immense effort made by all contributors. Each contributor and community member is vital to the technical development of the HCASH ecosystem.To stay up to date with information, or to join our community, check out the following channels:Twitter, Facebook, Reddit, English Telegram, Chinese Telegram, Korean Telegram, Korean Announcements, KakaoTalk, Naver Blog

HyperCash

19. 02. 08

Transaction History
Transaction History Market Market Transaction volume Address
BITHUMB HC/KRW 3,762.00 999,417,640.22 Short cut
EXX HC/BTC 3,672.64 739,144,489.15 Short cut
ZB.COM HC/BTC 3,659.78 556,795,411.87 Short cut
CoinEx HC/BTC 3,673.09 267,365,402.08 Short cut
Huobi Global HC/ETH 3,667.15 89,828,783.49 Short cut
Binance HC/ETH 3,677.76 71,841,523.97 Short cut
OKEx HC/ETH 3,766.10 1,342,396.15 Short cut
Kucoin HC/ETH 3,965.39 30,242.88 Short cut
Gate.io HC/ETH 3,406.52 0.00 Short cut
Bit-Z HC/BTC 1,224.07 0.00 Short cut
ACX To be provided later To be provided later To be provided later Short cut
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Information
Platform ERC20
Accepting
Hard cap -
Audit -
Stage -
Location -
Market of major crypto coins *2019년 07월 22일 last update

Bitcoin

BTC

12,323,239.21 KRW 4.11%

Ethereum

ETH

260,108.96 KRW 4.79%

Ripple

XRP

385.05 KRW 2.56%

Litecoin

LTC

115,199.17 KRW 5.10%

Bitcoin Cash

BCH

371,451.56 KRW 5.38%

Binance Coin

BNB

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Tether

USDT

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EOS

EOS

4,990.54 KRW 3.92%

Bitcoin SV

BSV

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TRON

TRX

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Stellar

XLM

105.65 KRW 6.53%

Cardano

ADA

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Monero

XMR

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Dash

DASH

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NEO

NEO

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Ethereum Classic

ETC

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Tezos

XTZ

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NEM

XEM

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Maker

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Ontology

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