Lisk

List makes it easy to build and deploy decentralized applications in Jav...

home link https://lisk.io/

reference material Whitepaper.pdf

Community

Market
2,351.48 KRW
Exchanges that listed the coin
35
Symbol
LSK
Dapp
To be released
Project introduction

Lisk is a databus platform for public block chains that uses separate chains called sidechains that branch off the main body. The goal is to make your own DApp easily within the Lisk platform, where people are open source.

Executives and partners

Max Kordek

CEO

Oliver Beddows

CTO

Mariusz Serek

Backend Developer

Maciej Baj

Backend Developer

Vít Stanislav

Frontend Developer

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Latest News

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Medium

Everything you need to know...

We have moved the LIP discussion to Lisk Research starting today. Lisk Research is supported by Discourse, a long-form discussion platform and enhances the debate with a much more inclusive and intuitive user experience. The existing discussion on the Mailing List has been moved to the new platform and the mailing list will remain in a read-only state.Lisk Improvement Proposals (LIPs) provide the scientific backbone to the development of the Lisk network. Introduced in late 2018, LIPs form a proposal system which allows transparent and open discussion on how the Lisk network is being built. The current LIP process allows us to gather feedback on proposals on how to tackle roadmap objectives and much more. The proposals can be submitted by anyone, provided that they correctly follow our official guidelines. In the true spirit of the open-source ethos however, it is as important for us to gather feedback about roadmap objectives as it is about the LIP process itself. We are very happy to announce that after receiving community feedback, we are discontinuing the LIP mailing list and introducing a new platform for discussion, Lisk Research. As of today, the existing discussion on the old platform has been moved to the new platform and the mailing list will remain in a read-only state, with all new submissions receiving an e-mail about the new platform.Lisk Research ensures an inclusive and user-friendly LIP experience.Lisk Research is supported by Discourse, an open-source platform which provides forums for long-form discussion. The introduction of the new landing page makes participating in the LIP process much more accessible. Apart from the obvious benefits of a much cleaner and user-friendly interface, there are a few main reasons for why this particular platform will help community members participating in the LIP process. Firstly, it supports two distinct typesetting systems, LaTeX and Markdown. These, along with visual features such as Graphviz diagram support, allow all LIP champions and discussion participants to include compelling and educational infographics to support their proposals.Extended visual options allow LIP Champions a more compelling medium for their proposals.The handy categorization system allows all proposals and discussions to be organized by themes such as Transactions, Cryptography, Economics and so on.Discussions are now neatly organized and easy to follow.There are also several features which allow the moderators to manage topics and posts, while at the same time providing full transparency to the reader about all changes have been made and why. Lastly, Lisk Research allows the users to only follow specific topics or categories that they are most interested in. In this way, Lisk Research’s users can customize what notifications they receive.Switching to Lisk Research is all about inclusion.The decision to switch to the Discourse platform had two main foundations. On one side, we received significant feedback from community members which implied the Mailing List is not the most inclusive and seamless experience for ensuring LIP participation. Secondly, we realized that while the mailing list is an industry standard for improvement proposals for other major networks such as Bitcoin, we can enhance and streamline the debate by changing to a more modern user interface of Discourse.The LIP Process will still apply to Lisk Research.The LIP Process is designed to strike a fine balance between the inclusion of valuable community opinions and continuing to reach the objectives of our development roadmap in a timely manner. Introduction of Lisk Research is meant to help all LIP champions participate in the debate, both by submitting their own proposals and giving feedback on the existing documents. The rules of discussion remain as follows — Lightcurve DevOps are the administrators of Lisk Research, while Lightcurve Scientists are its moderators. The latter will be moderating the content in the spirit of keeping the conversation within guidelines and centering around the technical and scientific development of the Lisk network. More information on posting can be found here and on the LIP process here. We hope that the switch to Lisk Research will allow more community members to get a clearer insight, or even contribute to, the ongoing scientific debate. Let’s build the future, together!The Lisk FoundationCheck out Lisk Research and get involved in the debate today.Everything you need to know about Lisk Research was originally published in Lisk Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Lisk

19. 03. 20

Benedikt Schuppli Joins the...

We want to welcome Benedikt Schuppli to the board of the Lisk Foundation. With a professional career at the intersection of law and blockchain, as well as a history of freelance legal work for Lisk, Benedikt has joined the Foundation’s board at the beginning of the new year.Benedikt brings substantial experience in law, banking, blockchain and much more.Benedikt has worked in a variety of thriving industries. He has finished his Masters in Law at the University of Zurich. Shortly after, he was admitted to the Bar as an attorney. His professional experience spans multiple sectors, ranging from Swiss private banks to public administration. In recent years, Benedikt focused primarily on the nascent blockchain industry. He was the Chief Legal Officer for Lykke, a Swiss-based cryptocurrency exchange. He also advised a number of successful blockchain startups on legal and regulatory matters. Furthermore, he’s authored papers on smart contracts and on blockchain and the law, as well as spoke on the topic at industry events including Blockchain Live in London. Currently, aside from contributing to the Lisk ecosystem as its board member, Benedikt has co-founded a project developing a smart contract programming language for lawyers.He has been involved with Lisk since the early days.Apart from his industry expertise, Benedikt brings with him an in-depth knowledge of the Lisk ecosystem. Benedikt was an early community member and adopter of the LSK token. He has started to contribute professionally to Lisk as early as 2017 as its freelance legal advisor.He will help the Foundation’s board in regulatory and strategic matters.Benedikt will use his experience in and knowledge of Lisk to help the Foundation oversee regulatory matters as well as provide strategic advice. As an early blockchain enthusiast and believer, his personal goal is also to ensure “the spirit of decentralization” remains in the project.Benedikt’s joining follows the departure of Pascal Schmid from the board, due to the Foundation’s parting of ways with Sielva Management SA.We want to give him a warm welcome to the Lisk Foundation and are looking forward to the great work we will do together.The Lisk FoundationBenedikt Schuppli Joins the Lisk Foundation’s Board was originally published in Lisk Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Lisk

19. 02. 18

Benedikt Schuppli Joins the...

We want to welcome Benedikt Schuppli to the board of the Lisk Foundation. With a professional career at the intersection of law and blockchain, as well as a history of freelance legal work for Lisk, Benedikt has joined the Foundation’s board at the beginning of the new year.Benedikt brings substantial experience in law, banking, blockchain and much more.Benedikt has worked in a variety of thriving industries. He has finished his Masters in Law at the University of Zurich. Shortly after, he was admitted to the Bar as an attorney. His professional experience spans multiple sectors, ranging from Swiss private banks to public administration. In recent years, Benedikt focused primarily on the nascent blockchain industry. He was the Chief Legal Officer for Lykke, a Swiss-based cryptocurrency exchange. He also advised a number of successful blockchain startups on legal and regulatory matters. Furthermore, he’s authored papers on smart contracts and on blockchain and the law, as well as spoke on the topic at industry events including Blockchain Live in London. Currently, aside from contributing to the Lisk ecosystem as its board member, Benedikt has co-founded a project developing a smart contract programming language for lawyers.He has been involved with Lisk since the early days.Apart from his industry expertise, Benedikt brings with him an in-depth knowledge of the Lisk ecosystem. Benedikt was an early community member and adopter of the LSK token. He has started to contribute professionally to Lisk as early as 2017 as its freelance legal advisor.He will help the Foundation’s board in regulatory and strategic matters.Benedikt will use his experience in and knowledge of Lisk to help the Foundation oversee regulatory matters as well as provide strategic advice. As an early blockchain enthusiast and believer, his personal goal is also to ensure “the spirit of decentralization” remains in the project.Benedikt’s joining follows the departure of Pascal Schmid from the board, due to the Foundation’s parting of ways with Sielva Management SA.We want to give him a warm welcome to the Lisk Foundation and are looking forward to the great work we will do together.The Lisk FoundationBenedikt Schuppli Joins the Lisk Foundation’s Board was originally published in Lisk Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Lisk

19. 02. 18

LiskDevUpdate: Core 1.5.0 i...

Lisk Dev Update: Core 1.5.0 in QA Testing, Hub’s Ledger Nano Integration and more!Hi Liskers,January is nearly over and Lightcurve development teams have a number of new releases already out and in the pipeline. Lisk Core 1.5.0 is nearing a release to Testnet and implements an extensible data persistence model, as well as other Roadmap objectives. Lisk Elements continues work on three libraries and integration into Lisk Core with 2.1.0. New Lisk Hub 1.9.0 release includes beta integration for Ledger Nano. Upcoming Lisk Mobile 0.10.0 features an iMessage extension, 3D touch, and German localization! Want to know more? Read on.Lisk CoreLisk Core 1.5.0 implements an extensible data persistence model1.5.0’s development phase is over and the release is currently in the Quality Assurance Testing (QA Testing) stage. Provided that no major regressions are spotted during QA testing, we expect to release Lisk Core 1.5.0 to Testnet early next week. This release will complete two objectives from Lisk’s development roadmap’s ‘Architecture and Design’ phase. These are:‘Use a consistent and informative versioning scheme’‘Implement extensible data persistence model’ which is a prerequisite requirement for implementing LIP-0005 (find out more about Lisk Improvement Proposals here).Lisk Core 1.6.0 will finalize the last stages of the new system architecture LIP1.6.0’s development started this week. This release will implement the second and last stage of the most significant objective of the Architecture and Design phase:‘Introduce a new flexible, resilient and modular architecture for Lisk Core’You can track the progress of this objective’s implementation on GitHub. The completion of the Architecture and Design phase consolidates the Lisk Modular repository into Lisk Core and sets the structure for the new modular architecture, by initially extracting two modules — “chain” and “http-api”. Several components scheduled for 1.5.0 were moved to 1.6.0 in order to prevent scope creep.The Architecture and Design phase is set to be fully implemented in the next three releases — 1.5.0, 1.6.0 and 1.7.0This excludes an urgent need for a patch release. The milestones explaining the implementation details of the last two objectives of the current roadmap phase will be included in the 1.7.0 release. These are:Implement design pattern for protocol change (LIP is currently in research)Improve transaction processing efficiencyWork for part of this release has already started on feature branches.Lisk ElementsLisk Elements 2.1.0 includes work on three libraries and continues integration with Core2.1.0’s development is finished. With this release, we have implemented features for the following libraries:Transaction extends the functionality for Core to be able to process transactions and lays down the basis of custom transactions for the future SDKTransaction-pool where transactions are held prior to being written to the blockP2P lays down the basis for LIP-0004 by creating the initial version of the library that is compatible with the current CoreWe are currently focusing on QA testing and refining these libraries. Moreover, using the created transaction and transaction-pool, we have started to work on the roadmap objective “Improve transaction processing efficiency” in Lisk Core. Once the QA testing is concluded, we will start to integrate the P2P library into Lisk Core. This is part of our long term strategy to incrementally increase the usage of Lisk Elements inside of Core, resulting in cleaner code, with functionality defined in one location.Lisk HubLisk Hub 1.9.0 now supports Ledger Nano Hardware integration in BETA1.9.0 was released on January 23 and includes the new Ledger Nano hardware wallet support. Ledger Nano support is introduced with the Beta label, which means there is still more testing and improvements to be made. The integration currently allows Windows and MacOS to use multiple accounts on Ledger Nano to receive and send LSK tokens as well as vote for delegates. Linux support will be added after 1.9.0. We encourage the community to try it out with Testnet and send us any feedback. Please be aware the Beta label has no impact on the security of the connection with the wallet.We would like to thank our community members Hirish and Vekexasia for their contributions to the Ledger Nano hardware wallet. For help with setting up your Ledger Nano to Lisk Hub, check out our Tech Evangelist Rachel’s walkthrough on Twitter:Please note that Hub 1.9.0 requires the latest Ledger Nano Firmware version 1.5.5.Please opt-in to share your Lisk Hub usage analytics with usIn order to improve the user experience of Lisk Hub we need to get more insights about its usage. At the same time, we care deeply about the privacy of our users. Because of the need to include user feedback, Lisk Hub 1.9.0 comes with the optional usage statistics analytics tool, Matomo. We kindly ask our community members to help us improve Lisk Hub by:Going to the Settings pageEnabling the “Send anonymous usage statistics” toggleIf enabled, the usage data such as buttons clicked or pages visited is gathered to a LiskHQ-hosted instance of Matomo. This ensures that no third party has access to your data.To opt-in, click on ‘Send anonymous usage statistics’ in ‘Advanced features’Lisk Hub 1.10.0 introduces our improved UI, showcasing months of research, design and user testing1.10.0’s feature development is finished. This ships with an entirely redesigned splash screen, login page, and registration process as well as menu navigation and bottom status bar.In Lisk Hub 1.11.0, you can look forward to further integrations of our new UX and UI1.11.0 is currently in development. We are working on design updates to further pages. More information regarding the upcoming features will be included in the next LiskDevUpdate.Lisk MobileLisk Mobile 0.10.0 will enable 3D Touch, sending LSK via iMessage and German localization 🇩🇪0.10.0 is close to being finalized, with the majority of the issues already resolved. This version brings with it a number of new features, including the 3D Touch shortcuts menu, which appears when you hold down the app icon for an extended period of time. The shortcut allows you to directly open the mobile wallet’s most used pages, which are the send and request pages (in our case). 3D Touch will be available on both Android and iOS.You will also be able to request tokens via an iMessage extension, which is a feature specific to iOS. If you own an iOS device, you can open iMessage directly and request tokens from your contacts, who can then decide to send or reject your request.Lastly, we’ve added German localization to the Lisk Mobile wallet, so the app will also be available to use auf Deutsch. There are multiple reasons for integrating this language option. One of these reasons takes into account our existing user-base and Germany ranks in the top three for all countries. For business development and developer adoption, Germany is a top market. According to the 2018 StackOverflow Developer Survey, Germany now has the largest professional developer population in Europe, overtaking the UK. In addition, Germany is ranked 2nd for its volume of Bitcoin nodes, making it prime territory for reaching blockchain early adopters.Lisk ExplorerLisk Explorer 2.2.2 will include UI fixes for desktop and mobile2.2.2’s development is currently ongoing and close to completion. It contains some UI fixes for both regular screen and smaller mobile resolutions. The update of package dependencies and a feature to display a warning when Explorer goes offline is also included.Thanks for keeping up with the latest developments here at Lightcurve. The next two weeks will see us progress further through the Architecture and Design phase of our development roadmap, as well as produce multiple releases across our product suite.Lightcurve Development TeamLisk empowers individuals to create a more decentralized, efficient and transparent global economy. We welcome you to join us in our mission.LIPs mailing listLisk.chatRedditTwitterDisclaimer: We’ve changed Lisk Mobile’s ‘iMessage plugin’ to ‘iMessage extension’ to accurately describe the new feature.Disclaimer 1: We’ve added Ledger’s Nano firmware link under Hub 1.9.0.LiskDevUpdate: Core 1.5.0 in QA, Hub’s Ledger Nano Integration and more! was originally published in Lisk Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Lisk

19. 01. 31

LiskDevUpdate: Core 1.5.0 i...

Lisk Dev Update: Core 1.5.0 in QA Testing, Hub’s Ledger Nano Integration and more!Hi Liskers,January is nearly over and Lightcurve development teams have a number of new releases already out and in the pipeline. Lisk Core 1.5.0 is nearing a release to Testnet and implements an extensible data persistence model, as well as other Roadmap objectives. Lisk Elements continues work on three libraries and integration into Lisk Core with 2.1.0. New Lisk Hub 1.9.0 release includes beta integration for Ledger Nano. Upcoming Lisk Mobile 0.10.0 features an iMessage extension, 3D touch, and German localization! Want to know more? Read on.Lisk CoreLisk Core 1.5.0 implements an extensible data persistence model1.5.0’s development phase is over and the release is currently in the Quality Assurance Testing (QA Testing) stage. Provided that no major regressions are spotted during QA testing, we expect to release Lisk Core 1.5.0 to Testnet early next week. This release will complete two objectives from Lisk’s development roadmap’s ‘Architecture and Design’ phase. These are:‘Use a consistent and informative versioning scheme’‘Implement extensible data persistence model’ which is a prerequisite requirement for implementing LIP-0005 (find out more about Lisk Improvement Proposals here).Lisk Core 1.6.0 will finalize the last stages of the new system architecture LIP1.6.0’s development started this week. This release will implement the second and last stage of the most significant objective of the Architecture and Design phase:‘Introduce a new flexible, resilient and modular architecture for Lisk Core’You can track the progress of this objective’s implementation on GitHub. The completion of the Architecture and Design phase consolidates the Lisk Modular repository into Lisk Core and sets the structure for the new modular architecture, by initially extracting two modules — “chain” and “http-api”. Several components scheduled for 1.5.0 were moved to 1.6.0 in order to prevent scope creep.The Architecture and Design phase is set to be fully implemented in the next three releases — 1.5.0, 1.6.0 and 1.7.0This excludes an urgent need for a patch release. The milestones explaining the implementation details of the last two objectives of the current roadmap phase will be included in the 1.7.0 release. These are:Implement design pattern for protocol change (LIP is currently in research)Improve transaction processing efficiencyWork for part of this release has already started on feature branches.Lisk ElementsLisk Elements 2.1.0 includes work on three libraries and continues integration with Core2.1.0’s development is finished. With this release, we have implemented features for the following libraries:Transaction extends the functionality for Core to be able to process transactions and lays down the basis of custom transactions for the future SDKTransaction-pool where transactions are held prior to being written to the blockP2P lays down the basis for LIP-0004 by creating the initial version of the library that is compatible with the current CoreWe are currently focusing on QA testing and refining these libraries. Moreover, using the created transaction and transaction-pool, we have started to work on the roadmap objective “Improve transaction processing efficiency” in Lisk Core. Once the QA testing is concluded, we will start to integrate the P2P library into Lisk Core. This is part of our long term strategy to incrementally increase the usage of Lisk Elements inside of Core, resulting in cleaner code, with functionality defined in one location.Lisk HubLisk Hub 1.9.0 now supports Ledger Nano Hardware integration in BETA1.9.0 was released on January 23 and includes the new Ledger Nano hardware wallet support. Ledger Nano support is introduced with the Beta label, which means there is still more testing and improvements to be made. The integration currently allows Windows and MacOS to use multiple accounts on Ledger Nano to receive and send LSK tokens as well as vote for delegates. Linux support will be added after 1.9.0. We encourage the community to try it out with Testnet and send us any feedback. Please be aware the Beta label has no impact on the security of the connection with the wallet.We would like to thank our community members Hirish and Vekexasia for their contributions to the Ledger Nano hardware wallet. For help with setting up your Ledger Nano to Lisk Hub, check out our Tech Evangelist Rachel’s walkthrough on Twitter:Please note that Hub 1.9.0 requires the latest Ledger Nano Firmware version 1.5.5.Please opt-in to share your Lisk Hub usage analytics with usIn order to improve the user experience of Lisk Hub we need to get more insights about its usage. At the same time, we care deeply about the privacy of our users. Because of the need to include user feedback, Lisk Hub 1.9.0 comes with the optional usage statistics analytics tool, Matomo. We kindly ask our community members to help us improve Lisk Hub by:Going to the Settings pageEnabling the “Send anonymous usage statistics” toggleIf enabled, the usage data such as buttons clicked or pages visited is gathered to a LiskHQ-hosted instance of Matomo. This ensures that no third party has access to your data.To opt-in, click on ‘Send anonymous usage statistics’ in ‘Advanced features’Lisk Hub 1.10.0 introduces our improved UI, showcasing months of research, design and user testing1.10.0’s feature development is finished. This ships with an entirely redesigned splash screen, login page, and registration process as well as menu navigation and bottom status bar.In Lisk Hub 1.11.0, you can look forward to further integrations of our new UX and UI1.11.0 is currently in development. We are working on design updates to further pages. More information regarding the upcoming features will be included in the next LiskDevUpdate.Lisk MobileLisk Mobile 0.10.0 will enable 3D Touch, sending LSK via iMessage and German localization 🇩🇪0.10.0 is close to being finalized, with the majority of the issues already resolved. This version brings with it a number of new features, including the 3D Touch shortcuts menu, which appears when you hold down the app icon for an extended period of time. The shortcut allows you to directly open the mobile wallet’s most used pages, which are the send and request pages (in our case). 3D Touch will be available on both Android and iOS.You will also be able to request tokens via an iMessage extension, which is a feature specific to iOS. If you own an iOS device, you can open iMessage directly and request tokens from your contacts, who can then decide to send or reject your request.Lastly, we’ve added German localization to the Lisk Mobile wallet, so the app will also be available to use auf Deutsch. There are multiple reasons for integrating this language option. One of these reasons takes into account our existing user-base and Germany ranks in the top three for all countries. For business development and developer adoption, Germany is a top market. According to the 2018 StackOverflow Developer Survey, Germany now has the largest professional developer population in Europe, overtaking the UK. In addition, Germany is ranked 2nd for its volume of Bitcoin nodes, making it prime territory for reaching blockchain early adopters.Lisk ExplorerLisk Explorer 2.2.2 will include UI fixes for desktop and mobile2.2.2’s development is currently ongoing and close to completion. It contains some UI fixes for both regular screen and smaller mobile resolutions. The update of package dependencies and a feature to display a warning when Explorer goes offline is also included.Thanks for keeping up with the latest developments here at Lightcurve. The next two weeks will see us progress further through the Architecture and Design phase of our development roadmap, as well as produce multiple releases across our product suite.Lightcurve Development TeamLisk empowers individuals to create a more decentralized, efficient and transparent global economy. We welcome you to join us in our mission.LIPs mailing listLisk.chatRedditTwitterDisclaimer: We’ve changed Lisk Mobile’s ‘iMessage plugin’ to ‘iMessage extension’ to accurately describe the new feature.Disclaimer 1: We’ve added Ledger’s Nano firmware link under Hub 1.9.0.LiskDevUpdate: Core 1.5.0 in QA, Hub’s Ledger Nano Integration and more! was originally published in Lisk Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Lisk

19. 01. 31

Guido Schmitz-Krummacher Jo...

Max, Oliver and GuidoWe want to welcome back Guido Schmitz-Krummacher to the Lisk Foundation. Having previously sat on the Foundation Council as a Board Member, Guido joins the office in Zug, Switzerland as its Managing Director, alongside two other experienced hires.The RoleGuido’s will be responsible for maintaining and developing all aspects of the Lisk Foundation. His primary focus will be its administrative, legal and financial wellbeing. With the expansion of the Zug office, Guido will oversee sourcing top talent to join him in supervising the activity of our office.He will use his international law background and Swiss regulatory system knowledge to make sure Lisk makes full use of Crypto Valley’s ecosystem. Guido will also be responsible for compiling regular reports and presenting his work’s results to the Foundation Council.The ExperienceGuido has previously worked in international humanitarian aid and executive positions in the financial, chemical and startup sectors. The latest chapter of his career has seen him focus on driving the global adoption of serious blockchain projects. His motto is ‘nothing is impossible,’ and he takes it very seriously in his work.Zug Office ExpandsTwo new hires have also joined Guido in our Zug office. Marcin Zarakowski is joining as the Legal Counsel. He will drive progress in compliance, corporate issues, and management of intellectual property. Camelia Ionela Mikesch has joined as the Foundation’s Accounting Manager and will help oversee its finances.Marcin, Guido and CameliaWith deep links to Lisk, as well as considerable contributions to a variety of significant blockchain projects based in the Crypto Valley, Guido is convinced of Lisk’s place as the top ecosystem for blockchain apps. We are happy to see him join the Foundation alongside Marcin and Camelia and look forward to benefiting from their diverse skill set and experience.The Lisk FoundationWant to know more? Follow us on Twitter or join the conversation on Lisk.Chat.Guido Schmitz-Krummacher Joins the Lisk Foundation as Managing Director, Alongside Two Extra Hires was originally published in Lisk Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Lisk

19. 01. 23

Guido Schmitz-Krummacher Jo...

Max, Oliver and GuidoWe want to welcome back Guido Schmitz-Krummacher to the Lisk Foundation. Having previously sat on the Foundation Council as a Board Member, Guido joins the office in Zug, Switzerland as its Managing Director, alongside two other experienced hires.The RoleGuido’s will be responsible for maintaining and developing all aspects of the Lisk Foundation. His primary focus will be its administrative, legal and financial wellbeing. With the expansion of the Zug office, Guido will oversee sourcing top talent to join him in supervising the activity of our office.He will use his international law background and Swiss regulatory system knowledge to make sure Lisk makes full use of Crypto Valley’s ecosystem. Guido will also be responsible for compiling regular reports and presenting his work’s results to the Foundation Council.The ExperienceGuido has previously worked in international humanitarian aid and executive positions in the financial, chemical and startup sectors. The latest chapter of his career has seen him focus on driving the global adoption of serious blockchain projects. His motto is ‘nothing is impossible,’ and he takes it very seriously in his work.Zug Office ExpandsTwo new hires have also joined Guido in our Zug office. Marcin Zarakowski is joining as the Legal Counsel. He will drive progress in compliance, corporate issues, and management of intellectual property. Camelia Ionela Mikesch has joined as the Foundation’s Accounting Manager and will help oversee its finances.Marcin, Guido and CameliaWith deep links to Lisk, as well as considerable contributions to a variety of significant blockchain projects based in the Crypto Valley, Guido is convinced of Lisk’s place as the top ecosystem for blockchain apps. We are happy to see him join the Foundation alongside Marcin and Camelia and look forward to benefiting from their diverse skill set and experience.The Lisk FoundationWant to know more? Follow us on Twitter or join the conversation on Lisk.Chat.Guido Schmitz-Krummacher Joins the Lisk Foundation as Managing Director, Alongside Two Extra Hires was originally published in Lisk Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Lisk

19. 01. 23

Development Update — Decemb...

Development Update — December 13, 2018Hi Liskers,The holidays are fast approaching — that doesn’t stop Lightcurve development teams from making headway across our suite of our products. We have released Lisk Core 1.3.1, Elements 2.0.0 and Hub 1.7.0. Check out the full rundown below.Lisk Core1.3.1 was released on December 5 in order to implement a security update from Node.js to v8.14.0 and SocketCluster to v14.3.3. Remaining node operators should upgrade if they haven’t already.1.4.0’s development is finished, and the QA Phase has begun. This release fulfills the last objective from the current Lisk Network Roadmap phase, “Quality & Performance”, and moves the build system directly into Lisk Core. It also tackles a large chunk of the backlog and closes 44 issues.1.5.0 will contain the first batch of changes from the next roadmap phase, “Architecture & Design.” Work on this phase has already begun, and the first pull request setting the fundamentals of the new Extensible Database Layer has been merged. It contains the basic structure of the database layer, and also contains a reference implementation of CRUD operations for the Account entity. This introduces new BaseEntity class which contains common methods available to entities that are extending it. The BaseEntity class also contains the blueprint of the methods that the subclass is required to implement hence acting as an interface. Another concept introduced by this pull request was Adapters which will allow to easily change the database solution if required.For now, the initial work on the Extensible Database Layer will be done on a separate feature branch. It will be merged back to development after all of the new Database Entities will be implemented and securely replaced within the existing codebase.Lisk Elements2.0.0 was released on December 3. This release brings with it an upgrade to Node.js v8, bringing Elements in line with Core. It also includes the addition of Sodium Native support for faster performance for cryptography-related functionalities. Benchmarks on sodium-native vs. TweetNaCl can be found in our documentation.2.1.0 is currently in development. As part of the “Improve transaction processing efficiency” roadmap objective, work on the transaction pool continued at a good pace, with a number of important issues being closed for this milestone.Work on the “Introduce robust peer selection and banning mechanism” objective continued with all the main methods which will be exported to the peer-to-peer library being declared, along with all relevant TypeScript definitions. The basic scaffolding for the peer-to-peer library’s test suite has been set up.Lisk Commander2.1.0’s major change, namely the migration of Lisk Commander to TypeScript, is expected to finish next week. Moreover, improvements have been made to the ‘transaction:get’ command, which includes pulling transactions by state unprocessed or unsigned and senderId. We have also created a new command to get all the voters for a delegate by typing ‘delegate:voters’. In addition, extra filtering functionality has been made to both of these commands.Lisk Hub1.7.0 was released on December 12. This release brings a number of updates to the overall look, noticeably the background has been changed to a lighter gray, with other elements adjusted to match. In addition, we have added a feedback button to the sidebar — you can now help steer the direction of Hub’s development directly from within the app!Lisk Mobile0.7.0 is currently awaiting approval in the App and Google stores and should be released shortly. This release brings with it a redesigned home page, a bookmark page, links to other accounts’ overviews when clicking on the address, UI improvements for smaller screens, and a progress bar on the send page.This is the last LiskDevUpdate for 2018. We’ll be back on January 17 and can’t wait to share with you all the exciting developments 2019 will bring.The Lisk TeamDevelopment Update — December 13, 2018 was originally published in Lisk Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Lisk

18. 12. 13

Development Update — Decemb...

Development Update — December 13, 2018Hi Liskers,The holidays are fast approaching — that doesn’t stop Lightcurve development teams from making headway across our suite of our products. We have released Lisk Core 1.3.1, Elements 2.0.0 and Hub 1.7.0. Check out the full rundown below.Lisk Core1.3.1 was released on December 5 in order to implement a security update from Node.js to v8.14.0 and SocketCluster to v14.3.3. Remaining node operators should upgrade if they haven’t already.1.4.0’s development is finished, and the QA Phase has begun. This release fulfills the last objective from the current Lisk Network Roadmap phase, “Quality & Performance”, and moves the build system directly into Lisk Core. It also tackles a large chunk of the backlog and closes 44 issues.1.5.0 will contain the first batch of changes from the next roadmap phase, “Architecture & Design.” Work on this phase has already begun, and the first pull request setting the fundamentals of the new Extensible Database Layer has been merged. It contains the basic structure of the database layer, and also contains a reference implementation of CRUD operations for the Account entity. This introduces new BaseEntity class which contains common methods available to entities that are extending it. The BaseEntity class also contains the blueprint of the methods that the subclass is required to implement hence acting as an interface. Another concept introduced by this pull request was Adapters which will allow to easily change the database solution if required.For now, the initial work on the Extensible Database Layer will be done on a separate feature branch. It will be merged back to development after all of the new Database Entities will be implemented and securely replaced within the existing codebase.Lisk Elements2.0.0 was released on December 3. This release brings with it an upgrade to Node.js v8, bringing Elements in line with Core. It also includes the addition of Sodium Native support for faster performance for cryptography-related functionalities. Benchmarks on sodium-native vs. TweetNaCl can be found in our documentation.2.1.0 is currently in development. As part of the “Improve transaction processing efficiency” roadmap objective, work on the transaction pool continued at a good pace, with a number of important issues being closed for this milestone.Work on the “Introduce robust peer selection and banning mechanism” objective continued with all the main methods which will be exported to the peer-to-peer library being declared, along with all relevant TypeScript definitions. The basic scaffolding for the peer-to-peer library’s test suite has been set up.Lisk Commander2.1.0’s major change, namely the migration of Lisk Commander to TypeScript, is expected to finish next week. Moreover, improvements have been made to the ‘transaction:get’ command, which includes pulling transactions by state unprocessed or unsigned and senderId. We have also created a new command to get all the voters for a delegate by typing ‘delegate:voters’. In addition, extra filtering functionality has been made to both of these commands.Lisk Hub1.7.0 was released on December 12. This release brings a number of updates to the overall look, noticeably the background has been changed to a lighter gray, with other elements adjusted to match. In addition, we have added a feedback button to the sidebar — you can now help steer the direction of Hub’s development directly from within the app!Lisk Mobile0.7.0 is currently awaiting approval in the App and Google stores and should be released shortly. This release brings with it a redesigned home page, a bookmark page, links to other accounts’ overviews when clicking on the address, UI improvements for smaller screens, and a progress bar on the send page.This is the last LiskDevUpdate for 2018. We’ll be back on January 17 and can’t wait to share with you all the exciting developments 2019 will bring.The Lisk TeamDevelopment Update — December 13, 2018 was originally published in Lisk Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Lisk

18. 12. 13

Development Update — Novemb...

Development Update — November 29, 2018Hi Liskers,As usual, it’s been a busy couple of weeks for Lightcurve Development teams. Aside from the unveiling of our Development Roadmap and the opening of the Lisk Improvement Proposal process, development work has continued uninterrupted. We have released Lisk Core 1.3.0, Elements 1.1.3, Mobile 0.6.0 and Explorer 2.1.8. Check out the full rundown below.Lisk Core1.3.0 was released to Mainnet as planned on November 19. 1.3.0 gives node operators the option to use New Relic as a service to monitor node performance. This will be useful for all network stakeholders — delegates, exchanges as well as Lightcurve’s development teams. We have created a dedicated repository for this integration, which will provide you with all the information you need to start experimenting with Lisk Core and New Relic (use of New Relic is strictly optional, of course).1.4.0’s development phase ends soon, with only two issues left to review before it moves to the QA phase. As 1.4.0 already fixes several bugs and contains many improvements, we decided not to include any objectives from the new roadmap. Instead, these objectives will be included in releases following 1.4.0. The documentation of 1.4.0 will also have to be updated, as the whole ‘lisk-build’ repository is now consolidated into ‘lisk’. You can expect a PR in the ‘lisk-docs’ repository soon. In the meantime, work on the objectives stated by the roadmap has already begun — keep an eye and track the progress of ‘Introduce new flexible, resilient and modular architecture’ together with a great Database Layer refactor by checking out the following milestone.Lisk Improvement Proposals will help to enrich our network’s development into a diverse and robust blockchain application platform. We will report on their implementation on GitHub and in DevUpdates with each LIP having corresponding milestones. The ‘Projects’ section of our GitHub will reflect the content of releases and consist of issues being part of backlog and milestones. Please read carefully how we intend to notify the community about breaking changes in this dedicated LIP.We’ve opened two new milestones, which are the implementation equivalents of LIPs. These are named “Consistent and informative versioning scheme” and “Introduce new flexible, resilient and modular architecture — Phase 1” (also described as ‘Application Architecture’ here). Application Architecture will consist of three phases in total, each of them contained in a separate milestone. The next Lisk Core release, 1.5.0, will contain the first phase of Application Architecture and pressing issues from the backlog.Several issues opened by community members discussing the protocol changes to Lisk Core had been closed. We highly encourage the community to provide the review following the LIPs processes as described in the guidelines and keep the separation between the Lisk Core implementation discussed on the repository.Lisk Commander2.1.0 is currently in development. It will include features such as being able to get information from the transaction pool, as well as enabling data field when creating transfer transactions. 2.1.0 will also introduce commands to get voters and vote information from the blockchain, as well as more flexibility to fetch transactions from the blockchain.Lisk Elements1.1.3 was released as a patch in order to fix an issue dealing with a runtime problem in the non-babel environment. Please make sure you are using this version in development.2.0.0 is currently in development and will be released as a release candidate next week. It will include a more detailed error message for API errors, an upgrade to Node 8.10, stricter validation when creating transactions, as well as support for sodium-native. It also will include our optional migration to TypeScript migration — read more about this here.2.1.0 is also currently in development. It contains milestones from LIPs “Improve transaction processing efficiency” and “Introduce robust peer selection and banning mechanism”.Lisk Hub1.7.0 is currently in development. Its features will include implementing a bright background design, giving it more of a desktop look. 1.7.0 will also add a feedback link to the sidebar, which opens up more opportunities for community feedback about our network dashboard’s development. This particular version has also seen a finalized unit test migration to Jest, as well removing of Mocha and Karma. Tests are now 2–3 times faster and easier to debug.Lisk Mobile0.6.0 was released and includes a variety of new features. These include a new design of the send screen, which breaks the interface into several pages and introduces bookmarked accounts. We’ve also implemented the FIAT exchange ratio option in the send screen. Now you can choose your preferred currency in the settings page. Lastly, we’ve implemented a QR code scanner for ease of use when signing in using the QR code representation of the users’ passphrase. This will be used to scan QR codes from the Lisk Hub and a Lisk paper wallet.Lisk Explorer2.1.8 was released on Mainnet. This release integrates usage of statistics and a heatmap.2.2.0 is currently in the development phase. It will include a few usability changes and a slightly updated design. Recently found bugs, some of them submitted by the community are going to be resolved. It will include many improvements such as pagination, filtering, account view, and better support for multi-signature accounts.Thanks for keeping up with the latest developments here at Lightcurve. We look forward to sharing with you what the next two weeks will bring mid-December.The Lisk TeamDevelopment Update — November 29, 2018 was originally published in Lisk Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Lisk

18. 11. 29

Development Update — Novemb...

Development Update — November 29, 2018Hi Liskers,As usual, it’s been a busy couple of weeks for Lightcurve Development teams. Aside from the unveiling of our Development Roadmap and the opening of the Lisk Improvement Proposal process, development work has continued uninterrupted. We have released Lisk Core 1.3.0, Elements 1.1.3, Mobile 0.6.0 and Explorer 2.1.8. Check out the full rundown below.Lisk Core1.3.0 was released to Mainnet as planned on November 19. 1.3.0 gives node operators the option to use New Relic as a service to monitor node performance. This will be useful for all network stakeholders — delegates, exchanges as well as Lightcurve’s development teams. We have created a dedicated repository for this integration, which will provide you with all the information you need to start experimenting with Lisk Core and New Relic (use of New Relic is strictly optional, of course).1.4.0’s development phase ends soon, with only two issues left to review before it moves to the QA phase. As 1.4.0 already fixes several bugs and contains many improvements, we decided not to include any objectives from the new roadmap. Instead, these objectives will be included in releases following 1.4.0. The documentation of 1.4.0 will also have to be updated, as the whole ‘lisk-build’ repository is now consolidated into ‘lisk’. You can expect a PR in the ‘lisk-docs’ repository soon. In the meantime, work on the objectives stated by the roadmap has already begun — keep an eye and track the progress of ‘Introduce new flexible, resilient and modular architecture’ together with a great Database Layer refactor by checking out the following milestone.Lisk Improvement Proposals will help to enrich our network’s development into a diverse and robust blockchain application platform. We will report on their implementation on GitHub and in DevUpdates with each LIP having corresponding milestones. The ‘Projects’ section of our GitHub will reflect the content of releases and consist of issues being part of backlog and milestones. Please read carefully how we intend to notify the community about breaking changes in this dedicated LIP.We’ve opened two new milestones, which are the implementation equivalents of LIPs. These are named “Consistent and informative versioning scheme” and “Introduce new flexible, resilient and modular architecture — Phase 1” (also described as ‘Application Architecture’ here). Application Architecture will consist of three phases in total, each of them contained in a separate milestone. The next Lisk Core release, 1.5.0, will contain the first phase of Application Architecture and pressing issues from the backlog.Several issues opened by community members discussing the protocol changes to Lisk Core had been closed. We highly encourage the community to provide the review following the LIPs processes as described in the guidelines and keep the separation between the Lisk Core implementation discussed on the repository.Lisk Commander2.1.0 is currently in development. It will include features such as being able to get information from the transaction pool, as well as enabling data field when creating transfer transactions. 2.1.0 will also introduce commands to get voters and vote information from the blockchain, as well as more flexibility to fetch transactions from the blockchain.Lisk Elements1.1.3 was released as a patch in order to fix an issue dealing with a runtime problem in the non-babel environment. Please make sure you are using this version in development.2.0.0 is currently in development and will be released as a release candidate next week. It will include a more detailed error message for API errors, an upgrade to Node 8.10, stricter validation when creating transactions, as well as support for sodium-native. It also will include our optional migration to TypeScript migration — read more about this here.2.1.0 is also currently in development. It contains milestones from LIPs “Improve transaction processing efficiency” and “Introduce robust peer selection and banning mechanism”.Lisk Hub1.7.0 is currently in development. Its features will include implementing a bright background design, giving it more of a desktop look. 1.7.0 will also add a feedback link to the sidebar, which opens up more opportunities for community feedback about our network dashboard’s development. This particular version has also seen a finalized unit test migration to Jest, as well removing of Mocha and Karma. Tests are now 2–3 times faster and easier to debug.Lisk Mobile0.6.0 was released and includes a variety of new features. These include a new design of the send screen, which breaks the interface into several pages and introduces bookmarked accounts. We’ve also implemented the FIAT exchange ratio option in the send screen. Now you can choose your preferred currency in the settings page. Lastly, we’ve implemented a QR code scanner for ease of use when signing in using the QR code representation of the users’ passphrase. This will be used to scan QR codes from the Lisk Hub and a Lisk paper wallet.Lisk Explorer2.1.8 was released on Mainnet. This release integrates usage of statistics and a heatmap.2.2.0 is currently in the development phase. It will include a few usability changes and a slightly updated design. Recently found bugs, some of them submitted by the community are going to be resolved. It will include many improvements such as pagination, filtering, account view, and better support for multi-signature accounts.Thanks for keeping up with the latest developments here at Lightcurve. We look forward to sharing with you what the next two weeks will bring mid-December.The Lisk TeamDevelopment Update — November 29, 2018 was originally published in Lisk Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Lisk

18. 11. 29

Introducing the Lisk Improv...

Hello Liskers,Along with the unveiling of the brand new Lisk Development Roadmap , we are pleased to announce the beginning of the Lisk Improvement Proposal process. Lisk Improvement Proposals, also known as LIPs, form a proposal system which allows transparent and open discussion on how we develop the Lisk network and all the objectives disclosed on the new roadmap. The LIPs themselves are thoroughly researched technical documents which are designed to be robustly debated. LIPs follow in the tradition of blockchain improvement proposal systems pioneered by the Bitcoin Improvement Proposals in 2011.To put it simply, the objectives disclosed on the new roadmap provide a clear indication of Lisk’s direction, while LIPs provide the scientific backbone to this direction.Lightcurve Science and Development teams have been trialing and refining the LIP process internally throughout this year. Today we are excited to reveal both the process and initial body of research produced during this timeframe. As the number of LIPs grows, we will continue to add to this, so please star and follow this repository to stay updated and involved.We look forward to working together with the community in an open-source, collaborative manner using LIPs.https://medium.com/media/b99767ce49cdbb924d8792f50fa3ea0e/hrefProcess OverviewLet’s have a look at how LIPs are actually submitted. Please note that the process described below is intended as a general overview. Community members that would like to submit a guideline-compliant and technologically feasible LIP, please make sure to first read the full rules outlined in LIP-0001. You can also find the terminology used below in our dedicated LIP FAQ.LIP IdeationThe first step in submitting a LIP is to check that the idea is feasible. Much of this early research and discussion will be conducted on our mailing list.LIP ResearchAfter checking the feasibility of the initial idea, the next step is for the LIP champion to present the idea as a draft, by creating a new thread on the mailing list.Proposal Drafted on GitHubAfter the discussion on our mailing list, the LIP champion can create a pull request on GitHub. The LIP editor, who is a member of the Lisk Foundation, will then review the proposal, check that it adheres to the guidelines and assign a number. It is important to note that the LIP Editor does not evaluate a LIP on its content, but purely on formatting and guideline compliance.There are eight LIPs (plus the guidelines) already merged into our GitHub repo, with the status of a “draft”. These LIPs have been published already as the research conducted by Lightcurve has been deemed complete by the Lisk Foundation. They can be used by the community as a guideline to demonstrate the style and manner in which LIPs should be written and to push forward initial development on our roadmap.Once the LIP is published as a draft on GitHub, community members can continue to discuss the proposal on its mailing list thread.Alpha Implementation of a LIPFollowing both the discussion on the mailing list, and reviewing the proposal on GitHub, the Lisk Foundation will carefully deliberate, considering community popularity and traction, and the feasibility of the proposal. After taking these factors into account, the Lisk Foundation can instruct Lightcurve to begin development of an alpha reference implementation (proof of concept). Lightcurve will also conduct QA on alphanet of this implementation.Beta Implementation of a LIPNext, the Lisk Foundation can instruct Lightcurve to build the beta reference implementation, this again will be tested by Lightcurve on betanet (for major releases) and with the help of the community on the Testnet (all releases).Once work on the Beta implementation begins, the status of the LIP will be changed to “proposed”.Production BuildAfter testing on Betanet and QA, Lightcurve will prepare the release for the Mainnet. Once this release has been accepted by the majority of the nodes on the network, we can consider the proposal to have achieved full consensus, and the LIP’s status is changed to “active”.Please note that the LIP process is not fixed in stone, as we expect it to gradually evolve over time. The community can also propose changes to it by submitting a LIP with their suggested improvements.This system takes us one step further on our journey to achieve the decentralized and open-source blockchain ecosystem we envisioned, one in which will reap the benefits of collaboration and constructive feedback of the wider Lisk developer community.Lisk Improvement Proposals will help to enrich our network’s development into a diverse and robust blockchain application platform. Let’s build the future together!The Lisk TeamDisclaimer: The statements made herein and via other means of communication in relation to the Lisk roadmap are not guarantees but express current intention and describe potential. Use of the information available in this document or otherwise related to the Lisk roadmap as well as any use of the Lisk products is subject to the terms of use of the Lisk website including the Lisk privacy policy as well as all applicable laws. The information contained herein is for informational purposes only and should not be construed as investment, financial, or other advice.Introducing the Lisk Improvement Proposal Process was originally published in Lisk Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Lisk

18. 11. 22

Introducing the Lisk Improv...

Hello Liskers,Along with the unveiling of the brand new Lisk Development Roadmap , we are pleased to announce the beginning of the Lisk Improvement Proposal process. Lisk Improvement Proposals, also known as LIPs, form a proposal system which allows transparent and open discussion on how we develop the Lisk network and all the objectives disclosed on the new roadmap. The LIPs themselves are thoroughly researched technical documents which are designed to be robustly debated. LIPs follow in the tradition of blockchain improvement proposal systems pioneered by the Bitcoin Improvement Proposals in 2011.To put it simply, the objectives disclosed on the new roadmap provide a clear indication of Lisk’s direction, while LIPs provide the scientific backbone to this direction.Lightcurve Science and Development teams have been trialing and refining the LIP process internally throughout this year. Today we are excited to reveal both the process and initial body of research produced during this timeframe. As the number of LIPs grows, we will continue to add to this, so please star and follow this repository to stay updated and involved.We look forward to working together with the community in an open-source, collaborative manner using LIPs.https://medium.com/media/b99767ce49cdbb924d8792f50fa3ea0e/hrefProcess OverviewLet’s have a look at how LIPs are actually submitted. Please note that the process described below is intended as a general overview. Community members that would like to submit a guideline-compliant and technologically feasible LIP, please make sure to first read the full rules outlined in LIP-0001. You can also find the terminology used below in our dedicated LIP FAQ.LIP IdeationThe first step in submitting a LIP is to check that the idea is feasible. Much of this early research and discussion will be conducted on our mailing list.LIP ResearchAfter checking the feasibility of the initial idea, the next step is for the LIP champion to present the idea as a draft, by creating a new thread on the mailing list.Proposal Drafted on GitHubAfter the discussion on our mailing list, the LIP champion can create a pull request on GitHub. The LIP editor, who is a member of the Lisk Foundation, will then review the proposal, check that it adheres to the guidelines and assign a number. It is important to note that the LIP Editor does not evaluate a LIP on its content, but purely on formatting and guideline compliance.There are eight LIPs (plus the guidelines) already merged into our GitHub repo, with the status of a “draft”. These LIPs have been published already as the research conducted by Lightcurve has been deemed complete by the Lisk Foundation. They can be used by the community as a guideline to demonstrate the style and manner in which LIPs should be written and to push forward initial development on our roadmap.Once the LIP is published as a draft on GitHub, community members can continue to discuss the proposal on its mailing list thread.Alpha Implementation of a LIPFollowing both the discussion on the mailing list, and reviewing the proposal on GitHub, the Lisk Foundation will carefully deliberate, considering community popularity and traction, and the feasibility of the proposal. After taking these factors into account, the Lisk Foundation can instruct Lightcurve to begin development of an alpha reference implementation (proof of concept). Lightcurve will also conduct QA on alphanet of this implementation.Beta Implementation of a LIPNext, the Lisk Foundation can instruct Lightcurve to build the beta reference implementation, this again will be tested by Lightcurve on betanet (for major releases) and with the help of the community on the Testnet (all releases).Once work on the Beta implementation begins, the status of the LIP will be changed to “proposed”.Production BuildAfter testing on Betanet and QA, Lightcurve will prepare the release for the Mainnet. Once this release has been accepted by the majority of the nodes on the network, we can consider the proposal to have achieved full consensus, and the LIP’s status is changed to “active”.Please note that the LIP process is not fixed in stone, as we expect it to gradually evolve over time. The community can also propose changes to it by submitting a LIP with their suggested improvements.This system takes us one step further on our journey to achieve the decentralized and open-source blockchain ecosystem we envisioned, one in which will reap the benefits of collaboration and constructive feedback of the wider Lisk developer community.Lisk Improvement Proposals will help to enrich our network’s development into a diverse and robust blockchain application platform. Let’s build the future together!The Lisk TeamDisclaimer: The statements made herein and via other means of communication in relation to the Lisk roadmap are not guarantees but express current intention and describe potential. Use of the information available in this document or otherwise related to the Lisk roadmap as well as any use of the Lisk products is subject to the terms of use of the Lisk website including the Lisk privacy policy as well as all applicable laws. The information contained herein is for informational purposes only and should not be construed as investment, financial, or other advice.Introducing the Lisk Improvement Proposal Process was originally published in Lisk Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Lisk

18. 11. 22

Everything You Need To Know...

Hello Liskers,Access the Power of Blockchain. For Lisk, these words were always more than a slogan. Since the very beginning, it was our mission to close the gap between future users and the disruptive technology of blockchain. Through an ever-evolving Lisk Foundation and partners like Lightcurve, we’ve begun to spread our promise of bringing accessibility to the world of blockchain through Lisk’s own network, user interfaces, and education. The question has always remained on our community’s minds, however — what about achieving the ultimate goal of blockchain accessibility? How will we get to the final product of a fully functioning Sidechain Development Kit (SDK), as well as the interoperable, trustless and open-source platform for building blockchain applications?Past attempts at formulating a clear roadmap taking us to the future Lisk ecosystem failed to encapsulate the complexity of building something so cutting-edge and future-proof. Accidents in the industry showed us what can happen when networks are designed carelessly. It became clear that the roadmap needs to be based on in-depth scientific research, combined with tested workflows and hiring strategies. We have also realized that the most successful and robust of blockchain networks will be built in a truly decentralized and open-source way — opening up each step of the journey to community’s feedback and contribution. Today, we are extremely pleased to announce the final result of this mature approach to blockchain platform building, with the release of our comprehensive Lisk Development Roadmap and the announcement of the Lisk Improvement Proposal process, detailed in a separate blog post.The Design of Lisk’s RoadmapWe are focusing on providing the whole package of a functioning ecosystem, combining progressive and innovative protocol change with tried and tested open source initiatives. The envisioned Lisk blockchain application platform is being designed to make development easy and accessible to the widest body of developers. Our flexible, resilient and modular architecture will be one of the key traits developers will find most appealing when compared to our competition. The TypeScript migration and design patterns will streamline building and supporting blockchain applications. Prioritizing the SDK over sidechains means that we can start fostering the blockchain application ecosystem whilst implementing sidechain interoperability.https://medium.com/media/0a20c1e3acb3d2ed44b058ce500cacc9/hrefThe structure of the roadmap reflects a more agile approach to our development workflow. This allows us to reach the final product as fast as possible, while also taking into consideration any external challenges or LIP iterations that we may face along the way. Additionally, this roadmap has been constructed with the objective of providing the most attractive blockchain application platform for developers to build on. We are creating the optimal recipe for an SDK that is based on a solid foundation of clean architecture and design principles, upon which Lisk applications are best positioned to adapt to an ever-changing environment.Before we deep-dive into the specifics of the roadmap, let’s clarify some of the terminology used in the process.Roadmap PhasesSo far we’ve completed the Inception phase of the Roadmap. This included reaching important objectives such as a new API and P2P module included in the release of Lisk Core 1.0. In order to get to the end goal in the most efficient and streamlined way, we have divided the remaining part of the roadmap into eight distinct phases. Each phase displays key milestones within Lisk’s development, generally focused on particular objectives and the corresponding LIPs.Quality & PerformanceThis phase will improve API and vote verification performance. It will boost developer experience by allowing multiple networks per build and moving Lisk Build to Lisk Core. It will also refine the configuration migration system for future releases and developer tooling by adding New Relic based node benchmarking. Lastly, we will expand upon the overall developer experience by migrating Lisk Elements to TypeScript (described further below), creating a mono-repo structure in Lisk Elements and moving Lisk Build to Lisk Core. This stage is already underway with multiple objectives already accomplished and LIP debate opened.Architecture & DesignBlockchains by nature are rigid and immutable, This makes it more difficult to bring about change to an existing protocol and implementation. Therefore, it is very important that “technical debt” is minimized while the application platform is in the current stage. This phase implements a new modular and resilient architecture for Lisk Core, bringing multi-process support and elegant handling of protocol change. After this phase, Lisk Core will be architecturally stable enabling developers to use the Alpha SDK. This means that the architecture used to create new applications will be finalized, allowing developers to start development of proof-of-concept applications that will align with the future SDK. The ability to conduct rapid application development via our SDK will only have preliminary support at this stage.Security & ReliabilityThis phase brings a guarantee that blocks are finalized after 150 confirmations. We will also focus on mitigating transaction replays on different chains, and adding a robust peer selection and banning mechanism to the P2P module. Lisk Elements will add the ‘fee estimation’ component that will be used as part of the dynamic fee system.Network EconomicsHere, we will focus on integrating dynamic fees in Lisk Core in order to increase activity within the network in preparation for the future ecosystem. We will also add the ‘chain’ component to Lisk Elements.Network LongevityThe Network Longevity phase will ensure the network continues to support the Lisk blockchain application platform beyond the final stages shown on the roadmap.To achieve this, we will replace the address and block/transaction ID systems to secure immutability of the blockchain. We will also implement the ability for the Lisk Network to handle change elegantly in preparation for the more significant changes to the network.Delegated-Proof-of-StakeAs the name implies, this phase will bring improvements to our consensus mechanism, as well as add the application bootstrap component to Lisk Elements. Upon its completion, developers will have access to our Beta SDK. Our proposed custom token system, ICO mechanism, and sidechain interoperability solution will not be supported at this stage.ICOs & Custom TokensBy the beginning of this phase, a variety of important objectives will have been completed. These include the provision of improved blockchain security, dynamic fees, a new ID system, an evolved DPoS, the complete migration of Core and Elements to TypeScript, and the ability to conduct rapid application development via our SDK. During this phase we will add functionality to conduct ICOs on the Lisk mainchain, a sidechain element to Lisk Elements, which on completion delivers our Release Candidate SDK. Developers will be able to build their proof-of-concept blockchain applications with the full support of Lisk Elements and Lisk Commander. They will also be able to fully bootstrap and develop new applications using our SDK, which will include registering & transferring custom tokens and conducting ICOs for applications on the Lisk mainchain. Our proposed sidechain interoperability solution will not yet be supported at this stage.Blockchain Application PlatformMarking the final stage of our development roadmap, this phase will add sidechain communication between Lisk Core and application chains. The Blockchain Application Platform will be delivered in full, along with the Production SDK. At this point, developers will have access to a fully functioning SDK with scalable interoperability between sidechains and the mainchain, as well as trust-less token transfers.Major Changes Coming to the Lisk NetworkSo far, we’ve discussed the clear path of objectives and phases leading us to our end goal of a fully functioning blockchain application platform and the opening of the Lisk Improvement Process. What major changes are going to be implemented during the course of our Development Roadmap?New Application ArchitectureAs we previously mentioned, along with the rollout of the Alpha SDK we will finalize our new application architecture. The architecture will create the elasticity for applications to be easily extended with new behaviour and scaled to utilize all available physical resources. The new design will allow applications to scale from a single thread, multiple processes, to even distributed processes, as well as enabling easy modification and extension of existing applications through the use of a plugin pattern and a supporting API. As all other objectives on the Lisk development roadmap, this process is subject to alteration and improvement during the LIP process — please refer to the Lightcurve-championed LIP and the community discussion that follows. Lastly, the initial topics of Quality & Performance, as well as Architecture & Design, are intended to minimize the amount of “technical debt” imposed on Lisk’s core application and its proposed ecosystem of blockchain applications.For a full overview of the phases and their individual objectives, please refer to the Lisk website.Migration to TypeScriptAfter the completion of the Beta SDK, we will have migrated both Lisk Core and Lisk Elements to TypeScript. Before we outline some of the main benefits of additionally implementing TypeScript, let’s have a deeper look at what exactly is this programming language. Technically, this programming language is a superset of JavaScript, meaning it can do everything that JavaScript does, plus some additional functionality. It’s an open source language which first appeared in 2012, and has been gaining popularity ever since. In 2017, it was voted third most loved language in StackOverflow’s 2017 survey and was chosen by Google to build Angular 2.0. The annual State of JavaScript surveys also show the gradual rise of both popularity and usage of this programming language among JavaScript developers. In 2018, over 45% of those surveyed have claimed that they have and would use it again, a rise from 33% just a year ago. Similarly, an additional 33% in 2018 claimed that they have heard of TypeScript and would like to learn more. TypeScript brings many additions to JavaScript, including type checking, interfaces, abstract classes, algebraic data types, code refactoring, auto-completion, async functions, and decorators.JavaScript by itself does not enforce type checking. This means that when writing JavaScript, we do not have to consider types too much. For example, we can declare a variable, without even stating what type we intend it to be. Later on, we can switch it freely to any other type. We can also create a variable and assign it to a string, which can later be re-assigned to a number or boolean. This can be problematic, creating a level of unpredictability in terms of how an application will behave to varying types of input. If developers do not maintain a constant awareness of possible scenarios while writing code, this can lead to a type error occurring at runtime. Such failures should never occur when running mission-critical applications.TypeScript allows Lisk to take advantage of all the benefits of JavaScript, for example, its use on both client and server, its vibrant open-source community, and popularity, in combination with the benefits of the predictability of a statically typed language. This programming language also provides a great development experience, especially within modern development environments. When coding TypeScript in such an environment, type checking will occur when the code is transpiled, for example when you save, rather than when the application is run. This constant feedback, allows developers to pick up on type errors earlier and deal with them immediately, removing any chance of a type error occurring at runtime. Lisk Elements is therefore a good candidate for TypeScript, by helping us with our mission to build an accessible and secure blockchain application platform. Having said that, we recognize that TypeScript might not be the preference of all developers, so you will also be able to develop on Lisk using regular JavaScript. TypeScript transpiles to JavaScript, meaning that when you run Lisk Elements on a server or a browser, it is JavaScript that is being compiled to machine code. During the Network Economics phase of our roadmap, and after all modules have been extracted and migrated to Lisk Elements, we will also migrate the remaining Lisk Core application to TypeScript.Lisk ProtocolThroughout the roadmap, there is a gradual process of logic extraction and migration to Lisk Elements. In the first two phases, we are focusing on resolving the quality, performance, architecture and design aspects of Lisk, which at this point in the roadmap all affect Lisk Core. Following these phases, the roadmap is focused on bringing about the required protocol changes, based on the new application architecture.Prioritization of PhasesOur ultimate goal is to deliver a world-leading blockchain application platform as quickly as possible. In order to do so, issues like scalability, security and architecture need to be prioritized.We recognize the importance of both improving the DPoS, as well as introducing dynamic fees, as it will play a vital role in establishing Lisk as a healthy and active ecosystem for developers to join. That is why dynamic fees are scheduled to come directly after we address protocol and SDK objectives outlined in the roadmap. We are also implementing some improvements related to DPoS in the earlier phases of the roadmap. For example, we aim to improve block verification and finality in the Security & Reliability phase, and we intend to provide a future-proof protocol change mechanism in the Network Longevity phase. Both of the aforementioned phases set the stage for the DPoS improvements. We also recognize that how our DPoS mechanism will be changed is going to be a widely contested issue. Therefore we want to encourage a more robust debate on the subject in our LIPs mailing list and gather as much community input as possible. If we do not actively engage developers, there will be no viable Lisk ecosystem. Therefore we need to ensure developers are able to develop on our platform as soon as possible. This is also the reason why we have prioritised the SDK implementation over sidechains.The Road to the Lisk EcosystemSo far, we’ve outlined the structure of the roadmap phases and its priorities, as well as key changes to the network and protocol. But how are we going to get to the end goal of a blockchain application platform? Each phase represented on the roadmap is to be internally broken down into a strict release schedule, where changes are brought about to our alphanet, betanet and testnet in smaller and easy to manage releases. We have recently changed the way in which we manage the team workload — our developers are now able to migrate between projects on demand. We can shift our human resources to where we need it the most, broadening the technological knowledge and awareness within the entire team, keeping our developers constantly engaged. This results-driven approach is supported by the fact that all of the research work has been done before implementation, integration and QA. Therefore our developers have a clear direction on how something needs to be implemented in order to meet an objective. Releasing LIPs championed by Lightcurve and opening up community debate means that each objective’s research will be completed early on and support the development cycle in a streamlined manner.How Definite Is the Roadmap?The naming of objectives refers to the broader idea of changes to be implemented which can be changed depending on the outcome of their individual LIP process. We view our roadmap as a “living” document, one that can, and should adapt according to the changing environment in which the blockchain industry exists. The roadmap is definite in the sense of the ordering of the objectives, phases, and intent towards building a fully functioning blockchain application platform. Of course, when we achieve major objectives such as our Production SDK, sidechain interoperability and more, we will begin planning on implementing additional features to further improve and stimulate activity on the Lisk network. Each objective will have an associated thread for discussion on our official LIPs mailing list. A brief abstract and motivation for the proposed objective will be given to seed ideas for community proposals. After the unveiling of the roadmap, the LIP process is officially opened — the community is then invited to submit their own proposals on the objectives they feel strongest about. After the research has been completed for an objective, we will publish its first draft proposal — the community will then have the opportunity to contribute to finalizing the proposal.For all outstanding questions please refer to our Roadmap FAQ or contact our community managers on Lisk Chat.Our new roadmap, along with the introduction of the Lisk Improvement Proposal process, ushers in a new era of true open-source collaboration for the Lisk ecosystem. This community-driven approach to building the future ecosystem will put Lisk at the forefront of blockchain application platforms. Along with our dedicated community, we look forward to continue driving innovation and adoption.The Lisk TeamDisclaimer: The statements made herein and via other means of communication in relation to the Lisk roadmap are not guarantees but express current intention and describe potential. Use of the information available in this document or otherwise related to the Lisk roadmap as well as any use of the Lisk products is subject to the terms of use of the Lisk website including the Lisk privacy policy as well as all applicable laws. The information contained herein is for informational purposes only and should not be construed as investment, financial, or other advice.Everything You Need To Know About Lisk’s New Development Roadmap was originally published in Lisk Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Lisk

18. 11. 22

Everything You Need To Know...

Hello Liskers,Access the Power of Blockchain. For Lisk, these words were always more than a slogan. Since the very beginning, it was our mission to close the gap between future users and the disruptive technology of blockchain. Through an ever-evolving Lisk Foundation and partners like Lightcurve, we’ve begun to spread our promise of bringing accessibility to the world of blockchain through Lisk’s own network, user interfaces, and education. The question has always remained on our community’s minds, however — what about achieving the ultimate goal of blockchain accessibility? How will we get to the final product of a fully functioning Sidechain Development Kit (SDK), as well as the interoperable, trustless and open-source platform for building blockchain applications?Past attempts at formulating a clear roadmap taking us to the future Lisk ecosystem failed to encapsulate the complexity of building something so cutting-edge and future-proof. Accidents in the industry showed us what can happen when networks are designed carelessly. It became clear that the roadmap needs to be based on in-depth scientific research, combined with tested workflows and hiring strategies. We have also realized that the most successful and robust of blockchain networks will be built in a truly decentralized and open-source way — opening up each step of the journey to community’s feedback and contribution. Today, we are extremely pleased to announce the final result of this mature approach to blockchain platform building, with the release of our comprehensive Lisk Development Roadmap and the announcement of the Lisk Improvement Proposal process, detailed in a separate blog post.The Design of Lisk’s RoadmapWe are focusing on providing the whole package of a functioning ecosystem, combining progressive and innovative protocol change with tried and tested open source initiatives. The envisioned Lisk blockchain application platform is being designed to make development easy and accessible to the widest body of developers. Our flexible, resilient and modular architecture will be one of the key traits developers will find most appealing when compared to our competition. The TypeScript migration and design patterns will streamline building and supporting blockchain applications. Prioritizing the SDK over sidechains means that we can start fostering the blockchain application ecosystem whilst implementing sidechain interoperability.https://medium.com/media/0a20c1e3acb3d2ed44b058ce500cacc9/hrefThe structure of the roadmap reflects a more agile approach to our development workflow. This allows us to reach the final product as fast as possible, while also taking into consideration any external challenges or LIP iterations that we may face along the way. Additionally, this roadmap has been constructed with the objective of providing the most attractive blockchain application platform for developers to build on. We are creating the optimal recipe for an SDK that is based on a solid foundation of clean architecture and design principles, upon which Lisk applications are best positioned to adapt to an ever-changing environment.Before we deep-dive into the specifics of the roadmap, let’s clarify some of the terminology used in the process.Roadmap PhasesSo far we’ve completed the Inception phase of the Roadmap. This included reaching important objectives such as a new API and P2P module included in the release of Lisk Core 1.0. In order to get to the end goal in the most efficient and streamlined way, we have divided the remaining part of the roadmap into eight distinct phases. Each phase displays key milestones within Lisk’s development, generally focused on particular objectives and the corresponding LIPs.Quality & PerformanceThis phase will improve API and vote verification performance. It will boost developer experience by allowing multiple networks per build and moving Lisk Build to Lisk Core. It will also refine the configuration migration system for future releases and developer tooling by adding New Relic based node benchmarking. Lastly, we will expand upon the overall developer experience by migrating Lisk Elements to TypeScript (described further below), creating a mono-repo structure in Lisk Elements and moving Lisk Build to Lisk Core. This stage is already underway with multiple objectives already accomplished and LIP debate opened.Architecture & DesignBlockchains by nature are rigid and immutable, This makes it more difficult to bring about change to an existing protocol and implementation. Therefore, it is very important that “technical debt” is minimized while the application platform is in the current stage. This phase implements a new modular and resilient architecture for Lisk Core, bringing multi-process support and elegant handling of protocol change. After this phase, Lisk Core will be architecturally stable enabling developers to use the Alpha SDK. This means that the architecture used to create new applications will be finalized, allowing developers to start development of proof-of-concept applications that will align with the future SDK. The ability to conduct rapid application development via our SDK will only have preliminary support at this stage.Security & ReliabilityThis phase brings a guarantee that blocks are finalized after 150 confirmations. We will also focus on mitigating transaction replays on different chains, and adding a robust peer selection and banning mechanism to the P2P module. Lisk Elements will add the ‘fee estimation’ component that will be used as part of the dynamic fee system.Network EconomicsHere, we will focus on integrating dynamic fees in Lisk Core in order to increase activity within the network in preparation for the future ecosystem. We will also add the ‘chain’ component to Lisk Elements.Network LongevityThe Network Longevity phase will ensure the network continues to support the Lisk blockchain application platform beyond the final stages shown on the roadmap.To achieve this, we will replace the address and block/transaction ID systems to secure immutability of the blockchain. We will also implement the ability for the Lisk Network to handle change elegantly in preparation for the more significant changes to the network.Delegated-Proof-of-StakeAs the name implies, this phase will bring improvements to our consensus mechanism, as well as add the application bootstrap component to Lisk Elements. Upon its completion, developers will have access to our Beta SDK. Our proposed custom token system, ICO mechanism, and sidechain interoperability solution will not be supported at this stage.ICOs & Custom TokensBy the beginning of this phase, a variety of important objectives will have been completed. These include the provision of improved blockchain security, dynamic fees, a new ID system, an evolved DPoS, the complete migration of Core and Elements to TypeScript, and the ability to conduct rapid application development via our SDK. During this phase we will add functionality to conduct ICOs on the Lisk mainchain, a sidechain element to Lisk Elements, which on completion delivers our Release Candidate SDK. Developers will be able to build their proof-of-concept blockchain applications with the full support of Lisk Elements and Lisk Commander. They will also be able to fully bootstrap and develop new applications using our SDK, which will include registering & transferring custom tokens and conducting ICOs for applications on the Lisk mainchain. Our proposed sidechain interoperability solution will not yet be supported at this stage.Blockchain Application PlatformMarking the final stage of our development roadmap, this phase will add sidechain communication between Lisk Core and application chains. The Blockchain Application Platform will be delivered in full, along with the Production SDK. At this point, developers will have access to a fully functioning SDK with scalable interoperability between sidechains and the mainchain, as well as trust-less token transfers.Major Changes Coming to the Lisk NetworkSo far, we’ve discussed the clear path of objectives and phases leading us to our end goal of a fully functioning blockchain application platform and the opening of the Lisk Improvement Process. What major changes are going to be implemented during the course of our Development Roadmap?New Application ArchitectureAs we previously mentioned, along with the rollout of the Alpha SDK we will finalize our new application architecture. The architecture will create the elasticity for applications to be easily extended with new behaviour and scaled to utilize all available physical resources. The new design will allow applications to scale from a single thread, multiple processes, to even distributed processes, as well as enabling easy modification and extension of existing applications through the use of a plugin pattern and a supporting API. As all other objectives on the Lisk development roadmap, this process is subject to alteration and improvement during the LIP process — please refer to the Lightcurve-championed LIP and the community discussion that follows. Lastly, the initial topics of Quality & Performance, as well as Architecture & Design, are intended to minimize the amount of “technical debt” imposed on Lisk’s core application and its proposed ecosystem of blockchain applications.For a full overview of the phases and their individual objectives, please refer to the Lisk website.Migration to TypeScriptAfter the completion of the Beta SDK, we will have migrated both Lisk Core and Lisk Elements to TypeScript. Before we outline some of the main benefits of additionally implementing TypeScript, let’s have a deeper look at what exactly is this programming language. Technically, this programming language is a superset of JavaScript, meaning it can do everything that JavaScript does, plus some additional functionality. It’s an open source language which first appeared in 2012, and has been gaining popularity ever since. In 2017, it was voted third most loved language in StackOverflow’s 2017 survey and was chosen by Google to build Angular 2.0. The annual State of JavaScript surveys also show the gradual rise of both popularity and usage of this programming language among JavaScript developers. In 2018, over 45% of those surveyed have claimed that they have and would use it again, a rise from 33% just a year ago. Similarly, an additional 33% in 2018 claimed that they have heard of TypeScript and would like to learn more. TypeScript brings many additions to JavaScript, including type checking, interfaces, abstract classes, algebraic data types, code refactoring, auto-completion, async functions, and decorators.JavaScript by itself does not enforce type checking. This means that when writing JavaScript, we do not have to consider types too much. For example, we can declare a variable, without even stating what type we intend it to be. Later on, we can switch it freely to any other type. We can also create a variable and assign it to a string, which can later be re-assigned to a number or boolean. This can be problematic, creating a level of unpredictability in terms of how an application will behave to varying types of input. If developers do not maintain a constant awareness of possible scenarios while writing code, this can lead to a type error occurring at runtime. Such failures should never occur when running mission-critical applications.TypeScript allows Lisk to take advantage of all the benefits of JavaScript, for example, its use on both client and server, its vibrant open-source community, and popularity, in combination with the benefits of the predictability of a statically typed language. This programming language also provides a great development experience, especially within modern development environments. When coding TypeScript in such an environment, type checking will occur when the code is transpiled, for example when you save, rather than when the application is run. This constant feedback, allows developers to pick up on type errors earlier and deal with them immediately, removing any chance of a type error occurring at runtime. Lisk Elements is therefore a good candidate for TypeScript, by helping us with our mission to build an accessible and secure blockchain application platform. Having said that, we recognize that TypeScript might not be the preference of all developers, so you will also be able to develop on Lisk using regular JavaScript. TypeScript transpiles to JavaScript, meaning that when you run Lisk Elements on a server or a browser, it is JavaScript that is being compiled to machine code. During the Network Economics phase of our roadmap, and after all modules have been extracted and migrated to Lisk Elements, we will also migrate the remaining Lisk Core application to TypeScript.Lisk ProtocolThroughout the roadmap, there is a gradual process of logic extraction and migration to Lisk Elements. In the first two phases, we are focusing on resolving the quality, performance, architecture and design aspects of Lisk, which at this point in the roadmap all affect Lisk Core. Following these phases, the roadmap is focused on bringing about the required protocol changes, based on the new application architecture.Prioritization of PhasesOur ultimate goal is to deliver a world-leading blockchain application platform as quickly as possible. In order to do so, issues like scalability, security and architecture need to be prioritized.We recognize the importance of both improving the DPoS, as well as introducing dynamic fees, as it will play a vital role in establishing Lisk as a healthy and active ecosystem for developers to join. That is why dynamic fees are scheduled to come directly after we address protocol and SDK objectives outlined in the roadmap. We are also implementing some improvements related to DPoS in the earlier phases of the roadmap. For example, we aim to improve block verification and finality in the Security & Reliability phase, and we intend to provide a future-proof protocol change mechanism in the Network Longevity phase. Both of the aforementioned phases set the stage for the DPoS improvements. We also recognize that how our DPoS mechanism will be changed is going to be a widely contested issue. Therefore we want to encourage a more robust debate on the subject in our LIPs mailing list and gather as much community input as possible. If we do not actively engage developers, there will be no viable Lisk ecosystem. Therefore we need to ensure developers are able to develop on our platform as soon as possible. This is also the reason why we have prioritised the SDK implementation over sidechains.The Road to the Lisk EcosystemSo far, we’ve outlined the structure of the roadmap phases and its priorities, as well as key changes to the network and protocol. But how are we going to get to the end goal of a blockchain application platform? Each phase represented on the roadmap is to be internally broken down into a strict release schedule, where changes are brought about to our alphanet, betanet and testnet in smaller and easy to manage releases. We have recently changed the way in which we manage the team workload — our developers are now able to migrate between projects on demand. We can shift our human resources to where we need it the most, broadening the technological knowledge and awareness within the entire team, keeping our developers constantly engaged. This results-driven approach is supported by the fact that all of the research work has been done before implementation, integration and QA. Therefore our developers have a clear direction on how something needs to be implemented in order to meet an objective. Releasing LIPs championed by Lightcurve and opening up community debate means that each objective’s research will be completed early on and support the development cycle in a streamlined manner.How Definite Is the Roadmap?The naming of objectives refers to the broader idea of changes to be implemented which can be changed depending on the outcome of their individual LIP process. We view our roadmap as a “living” document, one that can, and should adapt according to the changing environment in which the blockchain industry exists. The roadmap is definite in the sense of the ordering of the objectives, phases, and intent towards building a fully functioning blockchain application platform. Of course, when we achieve major objectives such as our Production SDK, sidechain interoperability and more, we will begin planning on implementing additional features to further improve and stimulate activity on the Lisk network. Each objective will have an associated thread for discussion on our official LIPs mailing list. A brief abstract and motivation for the proposed objective will be given to seed ideas for community proposals. After the unveiling of the roadmap, the LIP process is officially opened — the community is then invited to submit their own proposals on the objectives they feel strongest about. After the research has been completed for an objective, we will publish its first draft proposal — the community will then have the opportunity to contribute to finalizing the proposal.For all outstanding questions please refer to our Roadmap FAQ or contact our community managers on Lisk Chat.Our new roadmap, along with the introduction of the Lisk Improvement Proposal process, ushers in a new era of true open-source collaboration for the Lisk ecosystem. This community-driven approach to building the future ecosystem will put Lisk at the forefront of blockchain application platforms. Along with our dedicated community, we look forward to continue driving innovation and adoption.The Lisk TeamDisclaimer: The statements made herein and via other means of communication in relation to the Lisk roadmap are not guarantees but express current intention and describe potential. Use of the information available in this document or otherwise related to the Lisk roadmap as well as any use of the Lisk products is subject to the terms of use of the Lisk website including the Lisk privacy policy as well as all applicable laws. The information contained herein is for informational purposes only and should not be construed as investment, financial, or other advice.Everything You Need To Know About Lisk’s New Development Roadmap was originally published in Lisk Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Lisk

18. 11. 22

Development Update — Novemb...

Development Update — November 15, 2018Hi Liskers,As usual, it’s been a busy couple of weeks for Lightcurve Development teams. We have had a large number of releases, including Lisk Core 1.3.0-rc.0 to Testnet, Core 1.2.1, Commander 2.0.0, Elements 1.1.1, Hub 1.6.0, as well as Mobile 0.5.0. Check out the full rundown below.Lisk Core1.2.0 — This was released to Mainnet on Nov 8. For more details on 1.2.0’s features please refer to the previous Development Update.1.2.1 — This patch was a response to a submission to our new Bug Bounty Program. We were able to process the bug quickly and provide a solution the following day. The fix concerned an issue with signatures on multi-signature accounts, where a vulnerability made it possible to sign multi-signature transactions without the agreement of other participants. It is important to note that the issue was addressed quickly and a fix was delivered without any accounts being affected. We are pleased to see that the Bug Bounty is already bringing valuable contributions to Lisk’s security. Please be sure to upgrade your nodes with this important update.1.3.0 — We released the first Release Candidate for 1.3 to Testnet on Nov 14. 1.3 gives node operators the option to use New Relic as a service to monitor node performance. This will be useful for all network stakeholders — delegates, exchanges as well as Lightcurve’s development teams. We have created a dedicated repository for this integration, which will provide you with all the information you need to start experimenting with Lisk Core and New Relic (use of New Relic is strictly optional, of course). Provided that we do not identify any matters requiring further attention with 1.3.0 on Testnet, we plan to release it to Mainnet early next week.1.4.0 — Development of 1.4.0 is still ongoing, including several important bug-fixes and code refactors. As soon as Lisk Core 1.4 reaches Mainnet, Lisk Build will be archived. All of the build scripts necessary to convert Lisk Core into an installable package will reside in this directory.Lisk Elements and Commander2.0.0 (Commander) — This version brings with it framework changes (Vorpal to Oclif), improved validation of transaction inputs, an option to create multiple accounts, and an option to create a signature object for multi-signature accounts.1.1.1 (Elements) — This production version of Elements contains a change to the mono-repo structure, which allows us to put multiple packages in one repository. It also adds a validation function for transactions. From now on, we ask everyone who is using ‘lisk-elements’ for front-end development to start using either @liskhq/lisk-client or individual packages.Lisk Hub1.6.0 — This release adds the “set max amount” send feature, amongst other improvements. Download the latest version of Lisk Hub here.Lisk Mobile0.5.0 — This release of our smartphone wallet features a new welcome screen, amongst other changes. Download it on the App Store or Google Play.Thanks for keeping up with the latest developments here at Lightcurve. We look forward to sharing with you what the next two weeks will bring in early December.The Lisk TeamDevelopment Update — November 15, 2018 was originally published in Lisk Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Lisk

18. 11. 15

Development Update — Novemb...

Development Update — November 15, 2018Hi Liskers,As usual, it’s been a busy couple of weeks for Lightcurve Development teams. We have had a large number of releases, including Lisk Core 1.3.0-rc.0 to Testnet, Core 1.2.1, Commander 2.0.0, Elements 1.1.1, Hub 1.6.0, as well as Mobile 0.5.0. Check out the full rundown below.Lisk Core1.2.0 — This was released to Mainnet on Nov 8. For more details on 1.2.0’s features please refer to the previous Development Update.1.2.1 — This patch was a response to a submission to our new Bug Bounty Program. We were able to process the bug quickly and provide a solution the following day. The fix concerned an issue with signatures on multi-signature accounts, where a vulnerability made it possible to sign multi-signature transactions without the agreement of other participants. It is important to note that the issue was addressed quickly and a fix was delivered without any accounts being affected. We are pleased to see that the Bug Bounty is already bringing valuable contributions to Lisk’s security. Please be sure to upgrade your nodes with this important update.1.3.0 — We released the first Release Candidate for 1.3 to Testnet on Nov 14. 1.3 gives node operators the option to use New Relic as a service to monitor node performance. This will be useful for all network stakeholders — delegates, exchanges as well as Lightcurve’s development teams. We have created a dedicated repository for this integration, which will provide you with all the information you need to start experimenting with Lisk Core and New Relic (use of New Relic is strictly optional, of course). Provided that we do not identify any matters requiring further attention with 1.3.0 on Testnet, we plan to release it to Mainnet early next week.1.4.0 — Development of 1.4.0 is still ongoing, including several important bug-fixes and code refactors. As soon as Lisk Core 1.4 reaches Mainnet, Lisk Build will be archived. All of the build scripts necessary to convert Lisk Core into an installable package will reside in this directory.Lisk Elements and Commander2.0.0 (Commander) — This version brings with it framework changes (Vorpal to Oclif), improved validation of transaction inputs, an option to create multiple accounts, and an option to create a signature object for multi-signature accounts.1.1.1 (Elements) — This production version of Elements contains a change to the mono-repo structure, which allows us to put multiple packages in one repository. It also adds a validation function for transactions. From now on, we ask everyone who is using ‘lisk-elements’ for front-end development to start using either @liskhq/lisk-client or individual packages.Lisk Hub1.6.0 — This release adds the “set max amount” send feature, amongst other improvements. Download the latest version of Lisk Hub here.Lisk Mobile0.5.0 — This release of our smartphone wallet features a new welcome screen, amongst other changes. Download it on the App Store or Google Play.Thanks for keeping up with the latest developments here at Lightcurve. We look forward to sharing with you what the next two weeks will bring in early December.The Lisk TeamDevelopment Update — November 15, 2018 was originally published in Lisk Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Lisk

18. 11. 15

We Are Discontinuing Lisk N...

We Are Discontinuing Lisk Nano — Here’s WhyLisk Nano will be discontinued on November 14 at 12:00PM CET, as Lightcurve frontend teams focus on expanding Hub and Mobile. Nano’s code will be moved to an archived, public repository but will not be maintained by the Foundation or its contractors.Here at Lisk, we’re big believers in the part immersive user interfaces and experience will take in achieving global blockchain adoption. As with the boom of the Internet era, the general audience will be key in legitimising the technology through mainstream use. With this in mind, the Lisk Foundation has put great importance on creating industry-leading wallets and dashboards for all types of users to interact with our network and utility token, LSK. The first standalone product of the frontend branch of Lightcurve’s development was Lisk Nano. As previously announced, on November 14 12:00PM CET we will be discontinuing the support of Nano and focusing our efforts on the development of Lisk Hub and Mobile.Lisk NanoNano was first rolled out in August 2016. With five minor and two major releases in 2017 and 2018, 3552 commits from 20 contributors, 511 merged pull requests and 510 closed issues, it was the only official standalone wallet to manage LSK tokens or take part in our consensus algorithm for almost two years. We have announced the release of Lisk Hub at our February Relaunch event, which marked a new step in our journey to deliver user interfaces. During that period, we also disclosed our plans to eventually discontinue Nano and focus our work on new frontend products.Lisk HubFirst released in February 2018, Hub uses the logic for basic functionalities developed for Lisk Nano like transactions, voting for delegates and account creation, but expands on them in a variety of ways. The Hub is a collaborative effort of Lightcurve frontend development teams and specialist UX/UI contractors aimed at pushing its appeal beyond blockchain insiders and encouraging mainstream use. The design is slicker and has space for more features. Some already exist, for example exploring our blockchain, keeping up-to-date with the network’s updates, or following specific addresses. Hub’s design also allows us to easily implement more network features in the future, such as ICO registration and promotion. The amount of work that has already been put to Hub is incomparable to Nano. Even though it is less than a year old, Hub’s repository boasts over 7000 commits, 620 closed pull requests and 686 closed issues.Lisk MobileAnnounced at our Berlin Meetup on October 2018, Mobile retains basic functionalities of a wallet provided by Lisk Nano and extends them to smartphone users for a more casual, on-the-go experience. It already has such mobile user-friendly features such as biometric authentication, a QR code scanner, or passphrase backup.What’s next?So what exactly will happen to Nano? On November 14, we will remove it from our website and officially stop maintaining the code. As Lisk is fully open-source, Nano’s code will remain public for community to make use of for any third party applications they plan to develop. Please be aware that we do not officially endorse usage of Nano from that point and recommend downloading latest versions of Lisk Hub and Lisk Mobile. We look forward to keep delivering on our promise of creating industry-leading user interfaces.The Lisk TeamWe Are Discontinuing Lisk Nano — Here’s Why was originally published in Lisk Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Lisk

18. 11. 06

We Are Discontinuing Lisk N...

We Are Discontinuing Lisk Nano — Here’s WhyLisk Nano will be discontinued on November 14 at 12:00PM CET, as Lightcurve frontend teams focus on expanding Hub and Mobile. Nano’s code will be moved to an archived, public repository but will not be maintained by the Foundation or its contractors.Here at Lisk, we’re big believers in the part immersive user interfaces and experience will take in achieving global blockchain adoption. As with the boom of the Internet era, the general audience will be key in legitimising the technology through mainstream use. With this in mind, the Lisk Foundation has put great importance on creating industry-leading wallets and dashboards for all types of users to interact with our network and utility token, LSK. The first standalone product of the frontend branch of Lightcurve’s development was Lisk Nano. As previously announced, on November 14 12:00PM CET we will be discontinuing the support of Nano and focusing our efforts on the development of Lisk Hub and Mobile.Lisk NanoNano was first rolled out in August 2016. With five minor and two major releases in 2017 and 2018, 3552 commits from 20 contributors, 511 merged pull requests and 510 closed issues, it was the only official standalone wallet to manage LSK tokens or take part in our consensus algorithm for almost two years. We have announced the release of Lisk Hub at our February Relaunch event, which marked a new step in our journey to deliver user interfaces. During that period, we also disclosed our plans to eventually discontinue Nano and focus our work on new frontend products.Lisk HubFirst released in February 2018, Hub uses the logic for basic functionalities developed for Lisk Nano like transactions, voting for delegates and account creation, but expands on them in a variety of ways. The Hub is a collaborative effort of Lightcurve frontend development teams and specialist UX/UI contractors aimed at pushing its appeal beyond blockchain insiders and encouraging mainstream use. The design is slicker and has space for more features. Some already exist, for example exploring our blockchain, keeping up-to-date with the network’s updates, or following specific addresses. Hub’s design also allows us to easily implement more network features in the future, such as ICO registration and promotion. The amount of work that has already been put to Hub is incomparable to Nano. Even though it is less than a year old, Hub’s repository boasts over 7000 commits, 620 closed pull requests and 686 closed issues.Lisk MobileAnnounced at our Berlin Meetup on October 2018, Mobile retains basic functionalities of a wallet provided by Lisk Nano and extends them to smartphone users for a more casual, on-the-go experience. It already has such mobile user-friendly features such as biometric authentication, a QR code scanner, or passphrase backup.What’s next?So what exactly will happen to Nano? On November 14, we will remove it from our website and officially stop maintaining the code. As Lisk is fully open-source, Nano’s code will remain public for community to make use of for any third party applications they plan to develop. Please be aware that we do not officially endorse usage of Nano from that point and recommend downloading latest versions of Lisk Hub and Lisk Mobile. We look forward to keep delivering on our promise of creating industry-leading user interfaces.The Lisk TeamWe Are Discontinuing Lisk Nano — Here’s Why was originally published in Lisk Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Lisk

18. 11. 06

Development Update — Novemb...

Development Update — November 1, 2018Hi Liskers,As usual, it’s been a busy couple of weeks for Lightcurve Development teams. Among key achievements, we have the release of Lisk Core 1.1.1 to Mainnet, a new version of Hub 1.5.0 and Mobile 0.4.0. Check out the full rundown below.Lisk Core1.1.0 — With 1.1.0 released on Mainnet, node operators can now switch easily between networks without the need of rebuilding, as well as other improvements, such as an upgrade to Postgres 10, consistent usage of Bignumer.js. Full details of 1.1.0 are available in the previous blog.1.1.1 — This patch was released to Mainnet in response to a security vulnerability identified by community member, Simon Warta, as well as to network-facing problems due to issue #2490, which was caused by a failing validation schema.Simon disclosed two vulnerabilities related to the representation of Lisk addresses as strings. The first vulnerability was due to signatures being calculated from the first 8 bytes representing the address and the subsequent bytes being disregarded. The first identified vulnerability could make use of these overflow addresses by adding to them a long integer, resulting in a malformed address without the necessary matching private key. Only addresses 0L to 54L were affected by this first vulnerability, as all other addresses would result in a length greater than 21 characters, and therefore be rejected.The second vulnerability Simon identified refers to any address with a leading “0”. These zeros are skipped when it comes to generating transaction signatures, but are not being truncated while updating the balance in the database. This could also result in the transaction being sent to a malformed address, one in which it is impossible to generate a private-public keypair, resulting in LSK being inaccessible, or “burned”.Thanks to Simons’s disclosure, we were able to patch and release 1.1.1 within the next day. Throughout this period, the integrity of Lisk’s network was maintained and no transactions were maliciously burned during the patching process. The vast majority of node operators have upgraded to 1.1.1 within 24 hours. For those who haven’t updated their nodes on Testnet and Mainnet yet, please do so here.We are grateful for Simon’s hard work identifying the vulnerabilities mentioned above. Inspired by notable community contributions to our open-source culture like this one, we have decided to formalize our Bug Bounty Program. We look forward to continue working with the community to ensure the greatest level of security and robustness for the Lisk network.1.2.0 — This was released to Testnet on November 1. 1.2.0 includes an update to Node.js 8.12.0, support for new environment variables and use of DNS rather than IPs for seed nodes, amongst others. For more details refer to the previous dev update.1.3.0 — After the release of 1.2.0 to Testnet, the QA phase of 1.3.0 is due to start next week.1.4.0 — This version is currently in development. Work is underway on the new Fuzzy Search feature, which will allow users to search transactions by the transaction memo field. This will be of particular interest for community members who have built several tools and projects which utilise the transaction memo field. Implementing fuzzy search will allow for even greater creativity when working with this field.Lisk Elements and Commander2.0.0-beta.2 (Commander) — This release includes a bug fix for delegate registration and vote transactions.2.0.0 (Elements)— Work on migrating to TypeScript continues.Lisk Hub1.5.0 — The next version of the Hub was released on October 31. Users can now follow Lisk accounts, making it even easier to send Lisk transactions to known addresses. This is because users can follow and name commonly used addresses. No need to copy and paste, and double check when using followed accounts. Download the latest version of Hub to try out this cool new feature now.Lisk Mobile0.4.0 — This was released on October 25. With 0.4.0, users can now use biometric authentication (Face ID, Touch ID in IOS, and Fingerprint in Android) to log in to the app. We have also further improved the user experience by implementing pull-to-refresh functionality to the activity list, which makes it even easier to keep up-to-date with your latest LSK transactions. Full release notes can be found here.0.5.0 — Development on this version of Mobile continues. 0.5.0 will bring notifications and and an improved welcome screen to Lisk Mobile.Thanks for keeping up with the latest developments here at Lightcurve. We look forward to sharing with you what the next two weeks will bring in late November.The Lisk TeamDevelopment Update — November 1, 2018 was originally published in Lisk Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Lisk

18. 11. 01

Transaction History
Transaction History Market Market Transaction volume Address
CoinEgg LSK/BTC 2,398.88 2,311,463,445.48 Short cut
ABCC LSK/ETH 2,770.98 420,864,614.84 Short cut
CHAOEX LSK/BTC 2,511.43 337,339,569.10 Short cut
Coinall LSK/BTC 2,519.73 61,255,970.09 Short cut
Huobi Global LSK/ETH 2,517.41 24,673,628.59 Short cut
Coindeal LSK/BTC 2,395.87 10,802,027.35 Short cut
Exrates LSK/USDT 2,644.91 7,597,763.27 Short cut
LiteBit.eu LSK/EUR 2,507.09 1,950,027.62 Short cut
Gate.io LSK/BTC 2,500.75 1,395,587.97 Short cut
Bitbns LSK/INR 2,851.40 379,207.14 Short cut
Huobi (HBUS) LSK/BTC 2,509.84 345,300.62 Short cut
Huobi Korea LSK/ETH 2,523.58 25,921.91 Short cut
COSS LSK/TUSD 2,388.23 0.00 Short cut
Coinbe LSK/BTC 1,312.13 0.00 Short cut
Binance To be provided later To be provided later To be provided later Short cut
OKEx To be provided later To be provided later To be provided later Short cut
UPbit To be provided later To be provided later To be provided later Short cut
Abucoins To be provided later To be provided later To be provided later Short cut
xBTCe To be provided later To be provided later To be provided later Short cut
HitBTC To be provided later To be provided later To be provided later Short cut
Kucoin To be provided later To be provided later To be provided later Short cut
LiveCoin To be provided later To be provided later To be provided later Short cut
Hadax To be provided later To be provided later To be provided later Short cut
Bittrex To be provided later To be provided later To be provided later Short cut
Cryptopia To be provided later To be provided later To be provided later Short cut
Bit-Z To be provided later To be provided later To be provided later Short cut
YObit To be provided later To be provided later To be provided later Short cut
bitFlyer To be provided later To be provided later To be provided later Short cut
BitBay To be provided later To be provided later To be provided later Short cut
MixCoins To be provided later To be provided later To be provided later Short cut
SIMEX To be provided later To be provided later To be provided later Short cut
POLONIEX To be provided later To be provided later To be provided later Short cut
BitMEX To be provided later To be provided later To be provided later Short cut
EXMO To be provided later To be provided later To be provided later Short cut
COBINHOOD To be provided later To be provided later To be provided later Short cut
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Information
Platform ERC20
Accepting
Hard cap -
Audit -
Stage -
Location -
Market of major crypto coins *2019년 05월 22일 last update

Bitcoin

BTC

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Ethereum

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Ripple

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Bitcoin Cash

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