OmiseGO

Enablling financial inclusion and interoperability through OMG network.

home link https://omisego.network/

reference material Whitepaper.pdf

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Unbank the Banked OmiseGO enables financial inclusion and interoperability through the public, decentralized OMG network.

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Medium

The art of UI/UX at OmiseGO

Sitting down with OmiseGO UI/UX designer Tayanee Sriyotha“A blockchain or decentralized application can exist on its own, but without proper UX design, user research, and trust, the product cannot succeed in the market.” — Noei, UI/UX Designer at OmiseGOToday, we sit down with Tayanee Sriyotha, also known as Noei, UI/UX designer at OmiseGO to learn more about how she uses design thinking principles and models to create a meaningful experience for OmiseGO users.Noei first learned about OmiseGO and the world of blockchain from a friend who works for a fin-tech company. As a designer, she quickly saw potential challenges those who are not used to the technology could face.It’s why she joined OmiseGO, knowing it was the perfect place to experiment with design solutions she hopes to see people adopt. As Noei learned the ropes she became captivated by OmiseGO’s openness, its willingness for trial and error, and an open mind.Striking a Balance Between Logic and AestheticDuring the design process, Noei splits her workflow into two main parts: logic, which takes up 70%, and aesthetics, which makes up the other 30%.Her creative process typically starts with sketching the thumbnail. This is the ideation phase, so she doodles, tinkers, and adjusts until she believes she’s ‘got one’ that can be developed into a hi-res design.After touching base with her team for feedback, she’ll revise, polish, and touch up the design — fine-tuning things like size, gaps, and color shades. During this process, Noei’s favorite part is analyzing research data and turning it into a design strategy.Noei typically uses the Human-Centered Design principle (HDC) as her go-to framework. But also refers to other methods such as mental model mapping or user-journey mapping to design for different subjects and scenarios.Since design and user experience can be quite subjective, Noei’s definition of “design success” is when users can accomplish their goal(s) with ease.Noei relies on specific software to monitor and track success. So if she sees a spot where users cannot accomplish their intended goal, she and her team will investigate and make changes.The Path to Good UI/UXAccording to Noei, most people might think UI/UX is just about making the interface pretty and usable.But designing for aesthetics while maintaining usability is just the final touch. “Successful design takes various factors into account; I let the end-goal guide everything from user flow to layout, and more,” she adds.UI/UX is especially essential for the blockchain industry to encourage mainstream adoption. Good, intuitive design only includes what matters most to users. It helps them learn complex and unfamiliar concepts quickly.“Good design is the difference between a steep or gentle learning curve. When people to stop noticing ‘how difficult the concept is’ they gain confidence using a decentralized product or service.”A major obstacle from the designer’s point of view is understanding the technicalities behind the project. Before working on something for end-users, designers need to fully comprehend how the product or service works.This becomes even harder when the product is intended for advanced users like developers. Not only do designers need to understand the technical needs but also specific pain points, something Noei says “is way deeper than understanding consumer needs.”To overcome this, Noei relies on mental toughness and compassion. “You need to genuinely want to help people make things better even though it requires effort, this will stop you from quitting when things get tough.”“Talking to developers or those with technical backgrounds also helps connect the dots,” she adds. She might not get what they’re saying the first time, but over time, the vision and the path becomes clearer and clearer.A Message for Aspiring DesignersRecently, Noei was involved with UNICEF Innovation’s SURGE, a hackathon where people come together to work on blockchain-based solutions to address global challenges.Representing OmiseGO, Noei helped educate participants about design for decentralized applications. Most attendees were local developers working on blockchain-based solutions and Noei’s framework was put to use to turn concepts into tangible products.Last but not least, Noei has a message for aspiring designers: “If you’re interested in designing in the blockchain industry, the key is to keep learning whether it be about the technology itself or the behavior of people in the industry.”“Things keep changing constantly. Be patient when you try to connect the dots. Another tip would be to try matching or mimicking existing experiences with new ones you foresee when you work on a design project. This will help users with an easier transition when doing unfamiliar tasks.”The art of UI/UX at OmiseGO was originally published in OmiseGO Network on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

OmiseGO

19. 07. 31

OmiseGO July 2019 Roundup

It’s rainy season here in Thailand, but that’s not slowing us down!For July, we worked on improving Plasma’s resource usage, stability and availability. Additionally, we made progress on the abstract layer contracts implementation.We were also at the Bank of Thailand’s Bangkok Fintech Fair where our CTO, Kasima, was a panelist and discussed decentralized exchanges, plasma, and blockchain in detail.Tech UpdatesIntegration TeamFor the Integration Team the month of July was focused on Ethereum integration. A major update which will allow the OmiseGO eWallet to come closer to its primary goal of being an easy-to-use integration point for any kind of system that would want to integrate with a blockchain.The work done on Ethereum Integration included a deposit process using Hierarchical Deterministic wallets, the ability to deploy internal tokens as ERC-20 smart contracts on Ethereum from within the OmiseGO eWallet, and an integration with Metamask to allow admin users to send ETH and ERC-20 token from within the Admin Panel.Additionally, this month the integration team worked on integrating Potterhat with the eWallet to improve the resiliency of the overall program.For more details, read Integration Team updates #28 and #29PlasmaThis month was all about optimization as we looked towards improving Samrong’s resource usage, stability, and availability.To assess how much load the network could handle, we conducted a stress test but ran into some tooling issues which delayed the process. We will keep the community updated once we gather the results.We also continue to work on improving metrics and monitoring to meet production service standards while operating in a proof of authority (PoA). This is critical to onboard potential projects that are serious about using the plasma chain and integrating with the OMG network.Meanwhile, things are moving fast and furious on the abstract layer contracts implementation.We’ve almost reached feature parity with the existing contracts. We’re able to receive ETH and ERC-20 deposits, store block hashes, and support standard MVP exits for payment transactions.Once we reach our minimum viable feature set, we’ll be ready to begin audits.On the child chain side, we’ve been cleaning up some of the production monitoring tooling and are digging into supporting new transaction types.And finally, last week marked the end of Ari, our first alpha public test net which ran for 168 days with minimal downtime. We’ll have a drink to that!For more details, read Plasma updates #23, #24, & #25Goodbye AriThe biggest production milestone for us in the past iteration was actually shutting something down.Last week marked the end of Ari, our first public alpha testnet. In its 168 days of up-time, it produced 52,829 blocks, which included 1.64MM transactions.There were 360 deposits and 2207 exits, which amounted to ETH and 59 ERC-20 tokens. This marked the end of our first full Network Upgrade. We learned a lot from the process, and will share more in an upcoming blog post.As mentioned before, since this is plasma, users can still exit their funds by performing exits against the root chain contract — provided that they have exit information from a fully-synced watcher.Note that we will no longer monitor the Ari root chain contract for invalid exits and leave it up to the community to choose to keep the Rinkeby testnet funds safe.OmiseGO NewsWelcoming our new advisor!OmiseGO Regulations and Compliance Advisor, Tipsuda ThavaramaraWe welcome Tipsuda Thavaramara who joins OmiseGO as Regulations and Compliance Advisor.Ms. Tipsuda has 26 years of experience at the Thai Security and Exchange Commission (SEC). She was in charge of Policy, Markets and Intermediaries, and Investment Management. She also has extensive experience in capital market development.You can catch her on video with Vansa here as she talks about how regulators approach decentralized platforms.The “Endeavour entrepreneur” program.We’re happy to announce that after going through multiple stages of interviews, our CEO, Vansa, is an Endeavour entrepreneur!The program picks impactful entrepreneurs who can use Endeavor’s resources to create wealth and jobs.Last year, Endeavor Entrepreneurs created 3 million jobs, generated $20 billion in revenue and helped build sustainable growth models in their home countries.EventsBank of Thailand’s Bangkok Fintech Fair 2019OmiseGO CTO, Kasima Tharnpipitchai, was at the Bank of Thailand’s Bangkok Fintech Fair 2019. There, he spoke about Plasma, and how it has the potential scale blockchain by increasing transactions speeds and security.Kasima was also a panelist at the event, and was joined by Anthony Lewis of R3, Billy Rennekamp of Tendermint, Sagar Sarbhai of Ripple, and panel moderator Paul Sim from Deloitte.They discussed decentralized exchanges and what makes them interesting today. They also spoke about what a ‘traditional’ decentralized exchange looks like, and why they’re excited about the Swiss Government looking to regulate it.CodeElixrOn the other side of the globe, Unnawut, OmiseGO Integration team software engineer took to stage at CodeElixr in London. He spoke about building an interactive CLI app in Elixr, and highlighted the key features needed in a user-friendly CLI for Elixir applications.Upcoming EventsOctober 8–11 2019, Devcon 5 — Osaka, JapanOmiseGO July 2019 Roundup was originally published in OmiseGO Network on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

OmiseGO

19. 07. 31

The inevitability of blockc...

Dennis Keller at the Techsauce Global Summit 2019Last month at the Techsauce Global Summit held in Bangkok, OmiseGO VP of Commercial and Business Development, Dennis Keller delivered a talk titled “Digitalizing the world of financial transactions, assets and payments. Can blockchain succeed?” In this article, we take a closer look at his talk, OmiseGO in the world of digitized assets, and the potential of blockchain to securely store, verify, and transact data.In his talk, Dennis touched upon four main points: digitalization, security, scalability, and success factors. The first topic, “Digitalization is inevitable and transformative,” examined the significance of the internet across different industries: media, and how information sharing is now direct and immediate; entertainment, which gave us access to unlimited content, including music, videos, and shows; commerce, which has lessened the importance of a physical store presence as global commerce is now at our fingertips. Nevertheless, the Internet has yet to connect people financially: there are still those who belong in the “unbanked” category who have limited to no access to fast, fair, and safe financial services.Entering an increasingly digitalized worldThe world is seeing a trend where we’re moving away from fiat money towards digitized assets. A 2015 World Economic Forum (WEF) survey report indicated that 10% of the world’s GDP will be stored on blockchain technology by 2027, with 58% of all respondents seeing this shift to occur even earlier, by 2025. In addition to this, Deloitte’s 2019 blockchain survey reported that 53% of executives worldwide see blockchain as critically relevant –within the top 5 priorities to their companies and projects. One example that demonstrates this trend occurring at the consumer level is the emergence of cryptocurrencies as a burgeoning method of sending remittances in countries like the Philippines; international companies are making way to accommodate such transactions as reported by Coindesk.So where does OmiseGO fit in the picture? We have the eWallet Suite, which is a white label, fully open-source and customizable eWallet where users are able to store digital assets such as cryptocurrencies, loyalty points, in-app tokens, and employee benefit points. While the eWallet Suite can stand alone without the need for our decentralized exchange (DEX), the currency-agnostic DEX does offer interoperability, allowing users to trade between fiat, points, crypto, or any other asset that has been digitized and stored on the OMG network.Security is not a givenIn his second topic, “Security is not a given,” we learned how usability challenges turn into security challenges. Anyone who has a crypto wallet knows the importance of protecting their seed recovery phrase. Yet humans are not perfect; errors can be made. These recovery phrases can either be lost or stolen. Conversely, in our daily lives, we conduct transactions digitally, whether for digital banking or internet shopping–activities equally prone to hacking.Usability challenges turn into security challenges. Humans aren’t reliable… it is hard for us to manage and protect twelve random words.- Dennis Keller, TSGS 2019Blockchain falls into the same category of digital banking and internet shopping; it simply adds an additional layer of technology which seeks to enable fast, seamless, and frictionless financial transactions.Addressing scalability with PlasmaThe usual issue with Blockchain is that due to the consensus process, transactions can be slow. So blockchain projects can opt to trade off security (sidechains) or decentralization (DPoS with small validator sets) to make up for this. OmiseGO addresses the blockchain scalability trilemma with plasma, which allows us to “borrow” the decentralized security from Ethereum. In the context of an exchange, with plasma we get a secondary layer where we can process clearing and settlement in a non-custodial manner. What this does is that it allows for faster transactions by matching orders off-chain and settling transactions on a child chain. We get speed thanks to centralized matching, increased settlement bandwith by processing transactions in the child chain, without sacrificing security by still making commitments about the child chain blocks back to the root chain.Rome was not built in a dayLast but not least, there are factors that come into play in how much the technology we’re building is going to succeed. Community and collaboration is equally important as development innovation. Regulators, developers, and community participants are highly needed to foster understanding, transparency, and clarity. Without one or the other, none of what we’re building matters.Where blockchain and regulations meet, we believe the market for cryptocurrencies and blockchain will become increasingly regulated. As such we want to take a proactive approach on working closely across jurisdictions. Our CEO, Vansa Chatikavanij recently took part in the first Global Blockchain Council meeting convened by the World Economic Forum (WEF), and stated in her blog “Striking a balance between innovation and regulation,” that “it’s important that both sides, businesses and regulators, understand where each other is coming from and cooperate to shape a standard regulatory framework. Businesses must work with government to develop an optimal governance framework as neither side can tackle issues alone.”Within the OmiseGO community, we have the OmiseGO Developer Program (ODP), which allows participants to participate as Alpha testers for early stage products and Proof-of-Concepts before they are released to the public. This opportunity creates a more cohesive communication channel between participants in the ecosystem as well as the product and engineering team at OmiseGO, allowing them to have a say in the development and integration process of different products and features.Additionally, we’ve collaborated with UNICEF Innovation and UNICEF Thailand to launch the first ever SURGE Bangkok Hackathon. Our goal was to provide resources and tools to share information about blockchain as an emerging technology as well as help participants create better solutions for problems affecting their communities. Some of the teams that participated include EdChance, Children Future Fund (CFF), and iDonate. The first project solution aimed at funding migrant children’s education via Ethereum smart contracts, Status keycard, Gnosis’s safe, and much more. The second project is a savings solution in which a government issues a digital and e-crypto wallet for each child at birth. Last but not least, iDonate is a crowdfunding platform designed for teachers to raise funds for educational and teaching purposes. Ultimately, SURGE showed us the potential for blockchain technology to revolutionize different industries, changing the way we think, how we live and how we experience the world around us.While there has been an increase in interest in the blockchain industry, user adoption, as with all new technology, will take some time. Even with proper regulations in set and technology ready, we still need to ensure mainstream usage. The moment mainstream adoption can finally be achieved with blockchain technology is when we can use it without knowing we’re actually using it. An example Dennis gives is that of the Internet: it’s something we use all the time, yet the majority of us probably don’t know what HTTP stands for, what IP routing is, how packets are transferred across the Internet, and so on. In a similar manner, people don’t necessarily need to know that the OmiseGO network and exchange is built on blockchain technology — they don’t even need to know their applications are using the network. All they need to know is the fact that they can transact fast and seamlessly through regions and timezones, with the peace of mind that their transactions are secure and fair. Hackathons and initiatives like the ODP are ways OmiseGO is helping to achieve this. The more minds we have collaborating, improving the technology and creating decentralized applications the more we improve on usability and user design and interface.So…can blockchain succeed?We certainly believe so. Blockchain technology is already, for lack of a more suitable term, “disrupting” the financial industry. Across the globe various companies starting to look into blockchain integration. Forbes has reported that from the Forbes 2000 list not only are all ten of the largest public companies in the world exploring blockchain, but at least 50 of the biggest names on the list are doing so as well. On top of this development within the private sector, several central banks and national stock exchanges all over the world — like Singapore, Japan, Thailand, the Philippines, Lithuania, and Canada to name a few, are starting to open up to digitalized assets. Now that they are seeing more usage, they are initiating programs and setting up regulations to aide in the use of digital assets.The movement within the private Fintech space, the business industry at large, and of national and international government agencies is a testament to blockchain’s staying power and the inevitability of digitalized assets.The inevitability of blockchain and the digitalization of assets was originally published in OmiseGO Network on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

OmiseGO

19. 07. 21

OmiseGO June 2019 Roundup

Officially done with the first half of the year. Time sure flies when you’re busy BUIDLing.For June we released the public alpha of Samrong, the OmiseGO Networks latest iteration, and worked on the Ethereum integration for the eWallet which included working on the groundwork for our Plasma node to utilize potterhat for higher Ethereum connectivity. We joined the TechSauce Global Summit 2019, where Dennis Keller talks about the inevitability of digitalized assets and where the SURGE BKK Hackathon winners present their output.Tech updatesIntegration TeamThe main updates from the integration team revolve around Ethereum integration and the eWallet Suite’s primary objective: allowing individuals or businesses to easily set up their own digital wallet services that leverages blockchain technology.We lay a foundation for Ethereum integration including low-level codes for sending Ether and ERC-20 tokens. So far, we added the ability to make a transaction from the hot wallet to Ethereum (both in ETH or ERC20) and retrieve the balances for this wallet. Potterhat’s Ethereum node monitoring and RPC relay, and node failover have just been merged. This means the eWallet and eventually our Plasma node can utilize potterhat to achieve higher availability of Ethereum connectivity.In line with the goal of ease of use, the team has also worked on some admin panel improvements. The improvements include a 2-Factor-Authentication (2FA) for eWallet administrators and a few design and user experience upgrades. Including 2FA now provides an additional way for admins to secure their account and with the improvements in a few pages within the admin panel, it all equals to a more secure and easy to use eWallet Suite.For more details check out the integration team and eWallet updates #27PlasmaJune was all about Samrong. During the start of the month, we opened up the Network Upgrade to the ODP for testing. During this time, ODP members migrated their tokens onto the network. To ensure a smooth launch over the past cycle, the Plasma development team updated documentation and tooling for compatibility — this included the upgrade guide, a brand new js-starter kit and demos. The network was validated and bugs were fixed.After a few API improvements and an analysis of the feedback from our partners and ODP participants, we launched the Public Alpha of Samrong. As of this writing, Ari is still running to allow all our partners and ODP members to fully migrate their tokens.We also developed a few features. We are currently working on a design to support a persistently high throughput API for transactions and have done more refractors for better resiliency on the watcher. We’ve also broken ground on implementation of our version of the predicate contract architecture, which is designed to support upcoming settlement transactions without a hard network upgrade.For more details, read Plasma updates #21 and #22SamrongWe’ve moved on to the next station with the release of the Public Alpha of Samrong. This hard network upgrade required our partners and ODP participants to migrate their tokens from Ari on to the second version of the OmiseGO Network.This upgrade requires a change to the immutable smart contract on Ari. For this reason, Samrong will eventually replace Ari entirely. If you wish to continue using the OmiseGO Network, you will need to move your Rinkeby ETH (Ethereum) and ERC20 from Ari to Samrong.Why upgrade? Samrong includes a number of significant modifications:Improved Plasma integration and changes to Plasma smart contractsAri launched with Minimum Viable Plasma. Samrong builds on Ari’s Minimum Viable Plasma, and runs on More Viable Plasma (MoreVP). Samrong’s Plasma smart contract will thus be MoreVP compliant, but since the written smart contract can’t be modified, Samrong is implemented as a new, separate network, and will replace Ari.Greater resilience, less downtimeSamrong’s improved monitoring, reliability, and stability is better at handling high network loads.New transaction signature using EIP 712Samrong allows you to sign transactions using the EIP-712 standard, which allows signatures to be carried out through wallet integrations, such as Metamask. EIP-712 also allows Ethereum signatures to display in a structured and readable format.Meta-data fieldA new meta-data field allows users or dApps (decentralized applications) to store any information in their transactions.Join the ODP and connect to the latest iteration the OmiseGO Network HERETechsauceOmiseGO was at TechSauce Global Summit 2019. Dennis Keller, OmiseGO VP of Commercial & Business Development, gives a talk at the TechSauce Global Summit on the inevitability of digitalized financial transactions, assets and payments.Along with Dennis, we were re-introduced to our friends from the Surge BKK Hackathon. Dennis welcomed on stage the top 3 entries: third prize winner, Pisuth Daengthongdee Developer Evangelist — Perlin ­– the creators of iDonate the Decentralized Intelligent Crowdfunding application; second prize winners representative Tim Scheffman of CFF — who developed an ID system intended to hold a trust fund for each newborn child; and first prize winners Band Protocol’s with their representative Paul Chonpimai –the creators of EDChance the DApp which can track and reward the progress of the children of migrant workers.Events to look out forJuly 18 2019 — Code Elixir London, LondonJuly 18–19 2019, Bangkok Fintech Fair 2019: Technology Talk, BangkokOmiseGO June 2019 Roundup was originally published in OmiseGO Network on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

OmiseGO

19. 06. 30

Officially done with the fi...

OmiseGO June 2019 RoundupOfficially done with the first half of the year. Time sure flies when you’re busy BUIDLing.For June we released the public alpha of Samrong, the OmiseGO Networks latest iteration, and worked on the Ethereum integration for the eWallet which included working on the groundwork for our Plasma node to utilize potterhat for higher Ethereum connectivity. We joined the TechSauce Global Summit 2019, where Dennis gives a talk about the inevitability of the digitalization of assets and where the SURGE BKK Hackathon winners present their output.Tech updatesIntegration TeamThe main updates from the integration team revolve around Ethereum integration and the eWallet Suite’s primary objective: allowing individuals or businesses to easily set up their own digital wallet services that leverages blockchain technology.We lay a foundation for Ethereum integration including low-level codes for sending Ether and ERC-20 tokens. So far, we added the ability to make a transaction from the hot wallet to Ethereum (both in ETH or ERC20) and retrieve the balances for this wallet. Potterhat’s Ethereum node monitoring and RPC relay, and node failover have just been merged. This means the eWallet and eventually our Plasma node can utilize potterhat to achieve higher availability of Ethereum connectivity.In line with the goal of ease of use, the team has also worked on some admin panel improvements. The improvements include a 2-Factor-Authentication (2FA) for eWallet administrators and a few design and user experience upgrades. Including 2FA now provides an additional way for admins to secure their account and with the improvements in a few pages within the admin panel, it all equals to a more secure and easy to use eWallet Suite.For more details check out the integration team and eWallet updates #27PlasmaJune was all about Samrong. During the start of the month, we opened up the Network Upgrade to the ODP for testing. During this time, ODP members migrated their tokens onto the network. To ensure a smooth launch over the past cycle, the Plasma development team updated documentation and tooling for compatibility — this included the upgrade guide, a brand new js-starter kit and demos. The network was validated and bugs were fixed.After a few API improvements and an analysis of the feedback from our partners and ODP participants, we launched the Public Alpha of Samrong. As of this writing, Ari is still running to allow all our partners and ODP members to fully migrate their tokens.We also developed a few features. We are currently working on a design to support a persistently high throughput API for transactions and have done more refractors for better resiliency on the watcher. We’ve also broken ground on implementation of our version of the predicate contract architecture, which is designed to support upcoming settlement transactions without a hard network upgrade.For more details, read Plasma updates #21 and #22SamrongWe’ve moved on to the next station with the release of the Public Alpha of Samrong. This hard network upgrade required our partners and ODP participants to migrate their tokens from Ari on to the second version of the OmiseGO Network.This upgrade requires a change to the immutable smart contract on Ari. For this reason, Samrong will eventually replace Ari entirely. If you wish to continue using the OmiseGO Network, you will need to move your Rinkeby ETH (Ethereum) and ERC20 from Ari to Samrong.Why upgrade? Samrong includes a number of significant modifications:Improved Plasma integration and changes to Plasma smart contractsAri launched with Minimum Viable Plasma. Samrong builds on Ari’s Minimum Viable Plasma, and runs on More Viable Plasma (MoreVP). Samrong’s Plasma smart contract will thus be MoreVP compliant, but since the written smart contract can’t be modified, Samrong is implemented as a new, separate network, and will replace Ari.Greater resilience, less downtimeSamrong’s improved monitoring, reliability, and stability is better at handling high network loads.New transaction signature using EIP 712Samrong allows you to sign transactions using the EIP-712 standard, which allows signatures to be carried out through wallet integrations, such as Metamask. EIP-712 also allows Ethereum signatures to display in a structured and readable format.Meta-data fieldA new meta-data field allows users or dApps (decentralized applications) to store any information in their transactions.Join the ODP and connect to the latest iteration the OmiseGO Network HERETechsauceOmiseGO was at TechSauce Global Summit 2019. Dennis Keller, OmiseGO VP of Commercial & Business Development, gives a talk at the TechSauce Global Summit on the inevitability of digitalized financial transactions, assets and payments.Along with Dennis, we were re-introduced to our friends from the Surge BKK Hackathon. Dennis welcomed on stage the top 3 entries: third prize winner, Pisuth Daengthongdee Developer Evangelist — Perlin ­– the creators of iDonate the Decentralized Intelligent Crowdfunding application; second prize winners representative Tim Scheffman of CFF — who developed an ID system intended to hold a trust fund for each newborn child; and first prize winners Band Protocol’s with their representative Paul Chonpimai –the creators of EDChance the DApp which can track and reward the progress of the children of migrant workers.Events to look out forJuly 18 2019 — Code Elixir London, LondonJuly 18–19 2019, Bangkok Fintech Fair 2019: Technology Talk, Bangkok

OmiseGO

19. 06. 30

Community Partner — MVL

Community Partner — MVLLast year, we announced our partnership with Mass Vehicle Ledger (MVL) to develop a proof-of-concept (PoC) for their ride hailing service,TADA. It’s been a while and we think it’s time to take a closer look at MVL and learn more about the amazing things they’re doing with blockchain technology. For this issue, we had the opportunity to interview Jonathan Chua, General Manager of MVLchain. MVL is solving problems in the vehicle industry by gathering data that can be used to help with research and development of better cars, navigation and road safety. They are also using data to ensure quality services in insurance, convenient transportation services, and to create fair prices in the used car market. Q: Could you tell us about MVL, how you started and what MVL is all about? A: Mass Vehicle Ledger (“MVL”) is a connected mobility ecosystem based on transparent and trustworthy data that is recorded through our incentive blockchain protocol. MVL enables data from the various lifecycle of a car to be collected and recorded on the blockchain. We do this by incentivizing contributors such as drivers, mechanics and used car platforms amongst others in exchange for their data. Aggregated data that is anonymized can then be used for research and development purposes, whilst data on the individual level owned by the drivers themselves can be used for their own benefits such as when purchasing automotive insurance products or when trading their car. Our team behind MVL comes from a rich background of providing mobility solutions and services across Asia prior to embarking on building MVL. Having successfully operated our first mobility service, Easiway, between Hong Kong and Shenzhen, we have come to identify the gaps in the industry which is left unfilled by existing solutions. Necessity is the mother of all invention, very naturally our team decided to embark on deploying a blockchain solution for mobility to fill these gaps. Q: What problems do you hope to solve in this rapidly growing vehicle industry and how do you propose to solve them? A: Asymmetrical information is famously illustrated with the used car market as an example. George Akerloff termed faulty cars that were sold as if they were in perfect condition as “lemons”. In this example, we can see that the lack of trust is an age-old problem prevalent in the used car markets. The same for service providers in the mobility space, drivers cannot enjoy efficient prices for their automotive insurance and drivers on ride-hailing applications are not adequately and sustainably incentivized to provide safer rider with kindness. Imagine if you can purchase a used car with confidence or purchase your insurance knowing that it’s priced accurately based on your driving behavior. You will be able to avoid buying a “lemon” and enjoy greater savings as a safer driver. If you do not own a car and frequent ride-hailing services, imagine being confident that your driver is one who can serve you happily and safely. This is the world we want to achieve with MVL through our incentive blockchain protocol. By incentivizing drivers in return for data that is recorded on the block, we encourage better behaviors on the road through our connected ecosystem which rewards positive behaviors. Q: Could you tell us more about your project TADA? A: TADA is a ride-hailing service that is built on top of our MVL incentive blockchain protocol. TADA was introduced in Singapore last July and has been subsequently launched in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam and Phnom Penh, Cambodia in 2019. The unique value proposition of TADA is the driver-centricity of our platform. We are the first in Singapore and the region to offer our ride-hailing service with ZERO commission. We also actively engage our drivers through various platforms such as having our own telegram community, again an industry first, which helps us to refine our application with over 80 updates from feedback over the last 10 months. This is further powered by our MVL incentive blockchain protocol which further incentivizes drivers to give their best service to the riders. In doing so, we hope to achieve three main objectives. 1. Better livelihoods for drivers, 2. Better experiences for riders, and 3. Safer roads and a kinder interaction between our two user bases. We have attracted over 300,000 riders across the three cities we operate in and over 32,000 drivers signed up on the TADA platform. Q: What role does MVL believe blockchain in the future of the vehicle and transportation industry? A: The future of mobility is widely believed to lie in vehicles that are connected, shared, autonomous and electrified. From identifying and rewarding pro-social behaviors in shared vehicles to optimizing charging infrastructure locations to serve electric vehicles. Data is central to putting the wheels in motion for this coming mobility revolution. With data being such a critical component, the immutability and transparency that the blockchain provides will allow different mobility services to collaborate confidently together to innovate new products and services. Q: Could you tell us more about the work MVL has done with OmiseGO and what opportunities do you think this partnership could open? A: Since announcing a strategic partnership in November 2018, MVL and OmiseGO have been working together to combine technologies from both parties to develop a Proof-of-Concept (“POC”) and to undertake blockchain research. The POC is being developed to verify the suitability and performance of the OMG Network for MVL’s data record-keeping system. In this POC, Mobility data generated from MVL’s ride-hailing application TADA is recorded on the OMG Network. As part of the partnership, both MVL and OmiseGO have also been closely cooperating to research on how to further the use of blockchain technology in TADA. Beyond the scope of this cooperation, we believe that there are various opportunities to further MVL’s partnership with OmiseGO. Using the OmiseGO’s platform to verify that TADA’s data has been successfully recorded on the block, collaboration on facilitating crypto-payments on TADA to even potentially creating a mobility payment platform together are some of the opportunities we envision. Q: What OmiseGO technology is MVL excited to work on? A: With OmiseGO, we look forward to enabling seamless asset exchanges. Decentralized exchanges and digital asset gateway technology empowers MVL’s token economy by giving more seamless and convenient connections to powerful blockchain players. As MVL seeks to build an optimized ecosystem that improves the world of mobility by incentivizing pro-social activity, it is very important to ensure that MVL incentive system equates to tangible values to the participants. With the connection of OmiseGO’s interoperable blockchain, MVL expects that asset exchange function will be more secure and fast, which we hope will encourage our MVLERs’ pro-social activity. Q: With the technology MVL and OmiseGO is building where do you see the world of tokenized incentive systems for mobility services going? A: A tokenized incentive system for mobility services is not just a thing of the future, but a solution that can be adopted to improve the present state of mobility services today. As we build our trust-driven mobility ecosystem based on the blockchain with all data transparently managed. We believe we will positively engage all participants in our mobility ecosystem, such as mobility services (I.e. ride-sharing, carpooling and etc.), drivers, riders, manufacturers and service providers (I.e. mechanics, insurers, financing firms and etc.), to collaborate effectively with the value fairly distributed equitably to the respective participants. MVL’s incentive system has been tested on TADA in Singapore since February 2019. Since launch, MVL incentives in the form of MVL Points has been offered to users of TADA in exchange for travelling data and positive road behaviors. MVL points can be exchanged for MVL coins through the TADA app. As TADA users accumulate the MVL Points, they unlock higher MVL levels and receive various benefits. Drivers or riders who are placed in high MVL level is likely to be considered as “kind driver” or “friendly rider”. The higher MVL level you achieve, the more benefits you get. As cars are increasingly being shared, a sustainable mechanism such as our MVL incentives is also increasingly needed to ensure that users will benefit from showing consideration to others and for being safe. Get to know more about OmiseGO’s strategic partner MVL HEREOriginally published on the OmiseGO May 2019 Newsletter*EDIT: Corrected erratum stating that Jonathan Chua is Managing Director, he is the General Manager of MVLchain.Community Partner — MVL was originally published in OmiseGO Network on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

OmiseGO

19. 06. 17

OmiseGO and SURGE BKK 2019

Educating and BUIDLing for financial inclusionWe were at the first ever SURGE Bangkok Hackathon. This event was made possible through the collaboration between UNICEF Innovation, OmiseGO, UNICEF Thailand, KXMADE and other amazing blockchain based projects both in Thailand and overseas. The goal of the event was to share information about blockchain as an emerging technology. The event sought to provide education and networks to local participants and help people design and build solutions for the problems that affect their communities. SURGE Bangkok was a three-day event during the last week of May 2019. The event kicked off with a learning day that taught participants the basics of blockchain, exploring and working on Ethereum and starting a project. ­Input was provided on both the technical side and the non-technical aspects — including human centered design to understand local needs, when and how blockchain can augment development solutions, UX/UI and user testing for feedback. The main event was the two-day hackathon. The hackathon was opened by UNICEF representative, Thomas Davin, who introduced the SURGE BKK theme ­– building solutions for financial inclusion. UNICEF stated the importance of this theme, stating that to this day there are still over 2.5 billion people in the world who are financially excluded. He further emphasized how UNICEF as an organization is always on the lookout for ways to use technology and innovation to create solutions for every child.A vision of financial inclusionFollowing UNICEF’s opening message, Vansa Chatikavanij, CEO, OmiseGO delivered welcoming remarks echoing UNICEF’s sentiment that technology has the power to improve lives, and blockchain can be a tool to foster financial inclusion. The human dignity ethos of SURGE BKK is close to the core of OmiseGO. The company started on a vision for everyone to have the power to change the world through accessible, open systems that leverage blockchain technology. As a fintech company, OmiseGO’s mission is to enable people to access financial services that are fast, fair and secure. We build on blockchain technology because we see it as a means to provide easy access to financial services, and frictionless payments in a digital age. This includes enabling people the ability to tokenize assets, easily exchange digital assets, and transfer and make payments with them through mobile devices.Making financial inclusion a global realityTo enable financial inclusion, OmiseGO is building the OmiseGO Network, which is a public, permission-less, currency agnostic, infinitely scalable, cross chain compatible, decentralized exchange. In other words, the network serves as a medium of exchange for a range of digital assets and transactions, from in-game token transactions to cryptocurrency to financial services. Through the OmiseGO Network, anyone will be able to conduct financial transactions including payments, remittances, payroll deposit, B2B commerce, supply-chain finance, loyalty programs, asset management and trading and other on-demand services. The primary value in creating the OmiseGO Network is creating a future-ready infrastructure for payments and other forms of value transfer service which we believe, will be widely adopted. Further, millions of people in Asia-Pacific and beyond will be empowered with a tool that enables access to financial services that are fast, fair and secure — which is OmiseGO’s mission.Hand-in-hand for our communitiesWhile OmiseGO continues to develop a platform for enabling financial inclusion, we understand that financial exclusion is multifaceted — which we believe can be solved with everyone’s help. We are committed to supporting blockchain eco-systems, especially in our region.“We’re here because we believe technology can be an enabler to improve lives. We’re here to learn, share and innovate, so that we can bring positive change into our communities.”- Vansa Chatikavanij, SURGE BKK 2019 welcome addressEveryone has a role to play when it comes to developing solutions that address the barriers to financial inclusion. At SURGE BKK, we did so through education, technology mentorship and business input. The weekend was an opportunity for enhancing skills, sharing and receiving knowledge from peers and mentors, and then testing assumptions and skills through the hackathon. Thank you to all the SURGE BKK participants. Over the course of three days we saw the amount of work and thought teams put into their projects; applying their technical knowledge to cater to the needs of the at-risk communities that UNICEF Thailand is working with. We thoroughly enjoyed listening to each team’s presentation that covered applications that solve issues of student class attendance, that promote financial literacy among youth, apps that connect local communities to the much-needed funding, and many more. Big congrats to the winning teams! They will progress to pitch on the blockchain stage at Techsauce Global Summit 2019 in Thailand in June, and of course, we will be there too as a speaker. We hope to see you there!Originally published on the OmiseGO May 2019 NewsletterOmiseGO and SURGE BKK 2019 was originally published in OmiseGO Network on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

OmiseGO

19. 06. 11

OmiseGO May 2019 Roundup

Tech UpdatesPlasmaAfter the successful launch of Ari we now look towards our next network iteration, Samrong. Network upgrade preparation was the focus during the first few weeks of May. This involved testing exits, preparing client software and updating documentation. This preparation should ensure that when we start the network upgrade, all UTXO owners on Ari will have the necessary tools to easily exit their UTXOs back to Rinkeby and re-deposit them into the upgraded contract and child chain.Once we completed the network preparation, we deployed and tested the new version. This includes additional features we’ve been working on, including: transaction metadata, simple UTXO management and ERC-712 signing support. So far, all has been smooth sailing with our network tests. We expect to open up the new network to the ODP imminently. After a bit more testing under the ODP, once the team considers the new network to be stable, we will then commence the network upgrade process.For more details check out Plasma updates #19 and #20Announcing the next station: Samrong, the OMG Network v0.2In May we happily announced the coming of the newest release version of our Network, `Samrong` — the second iteration of the OMG Network. In this iteration, we’ve applied the learnings and improvements we’ve made since the launch of Ari. This upgrade will require users on Ari to start migrating their funds to Samrong, simulating the actual process of fund migration between networks. With the complication of this upgrade in mind, we’ve also been pushing forward with research around a predicate-like contract architecture. We hope that the new architecture can reduce the number of times we need to perform this kind of “hard” upgrade.eWallet Update — The integration team.Many of those who religiously follow the eWallet updates may have noticed a change in nomenclature. The eWallet team is now called the Integration team. The team’s name change reflects their all-encompassing role of serving as a bridge between all OmiseGO teams and the public. Their focus being public-facing services, such as their main project the eWallet.Over the month of May the team focused on the testing and fixing of bugs in the admin panel for the eWallet 1.2 release, Ethereum integration and Potterhat.Potterhat is an experimental, open-source Blockchain “client orchestrator” in development by Integration Team. Potterhat provides failover across multiple blockchain clients (Geth, Parity, Pantheon) to potentially improve reliability of Blockchain-based services. The success of this “client orchestrator” would be a big factor in achieving Ethereum integration for the eWallet and Plasma ­–since reliability of Ethereum directly affects service availability. As of the end of May, the Initial proof-of-concept implementation of Potterhat orchestrator has been completed and the initial work on Potterhat deployment has started.Another project the team has worked on this month is OmiseGO’s internal reward bot. This project, while not directly linked to the eWallet, is a major step in understanding how the eWallet can be used in the real world. It should help better our understanding about user behavior and which areas may need improvement.For more details, check out OmiseGO Integration Team updates #24 and #25SURGE BKKOmiseGO collaborated with UNICEF Innovation, UNICEF Thailand and KXMADE to bring SURGE to Bangkok. The three-day event ran from May 24–26 2019. The event kicked off with a learning day that taught participants the basics of blockchain, exploring and working on Ethereum, and starting a project. Pong, Product Manager at OmiseGO, delivered a workshop on how to conduct transactions on the OMG Network. Noei, OmiseGO UI/EX Designer, was a mentor at the hackathon and provided a workshop on designing user experience decentralized applications (DApps).The main event was the two-day hackathon which was opened by UNICEF’s Thomas Davin, who introduced the SURGE BKK theme ­– building solutions for financial inclusion. Vansa, OmiseGO CEO, was there to welcome the hackers to the event, emphasizing everyone’s role in creating better lives for our communities through technology.The winning teams from SURGE Hackathon will progress to pitch on the blockchain stage at Techsauce Global Summit 2019 in Thailand in June, alongside OmiseGO.Event to Look out for:June 6–8 2019 — Decrypt Tokyo, JapanOmiseGO May 2019 Roundup was originally published in OmiseGO Network on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

OmiseGO

19. 05. 31

Community Partner Chris fro...

Chris is the community manager of Hoard, the creators of Plasma Dog. He and his team are focused on enabling true ownership of assets in video games –with ethereum-based builds. He has spoken about the influence of blockchain in video games and society at events like NIFTY, the Ethereum Community Fund’s Non-Fungible Summit, NFT.NYC, and a number of ETHGlobal hackathons. This month, we get to know more about Chris, Hoard and its projects and how it has been building on the OMG Network.Q: Could you tell us a little bit more about yourself, your background and what you do at Hoard? A: My name is Chris Robison, and I’m the community manager at Hoard, where we enable true ownership of virtual assets inside of video games. I discovered bitcoin back in 2011 while I was a student at the University of Portland. The entire concept completely captivated me, and it’s been a non-stop journey ever since. I included bitcoin in my senior capstone project, and after graduating, continued to engage in the community attending various local meetups and participating in online forums. For a period of time, I was one of the top contributors to the Ethereum stack overflow. In 2017 I was leading communications for global operations at a Fortune 500 in Seattle when I realized blockchain had, after all these years, actually become a formal industry and I had more to contribute to it than ever before. I joined Hoard as it was coming out of stealth mode and now spend my time educating gamers, developers, and blockchain enthusiasts on the benefits of adding True Ownership to video games. I sincerely believe games will be one of the first places crypto will gain mass adoption, and it will be the cultural lynchpin for decentralization. Q: Tell us about the inspiration behind Plasma Dog? A: Plasma Dog is a retro-style, pixel art, 2D platformer with a gameplay similar to the original Super Mario titles. Plasma Dog, named after Jun Hasegawa’s pet Golden Retriever*, traverses the Blockchain World collecting coins while stomping enemy characters. The theme of Plasma Dog is educational and intended to passively teach players about fundamental Plasma architecture features. The in-game coins, for example, are called “UTXOs,” which reflects the Unspent-Transaction-Output scheme Plasma uses to ensure users balances are totally secure. And the bad guys, as another example, are named after bad things that could happen in a Plasma chain, including: Double Spend Attacks, Fraudulent Exits, and Faulty Childchains (don’t worry, though. Even if these bad guys get you, your coins are still safe in your wallet!) Q: Tell us about your experience working with the OMG Network, how was it starting all the way from the first testnet and now being on public alpha? A: It’s really not an exaggeration to say working with the OMG Network has been one of the team’s most gratifying experiences to date. Hoard began more than a year ago, and even back then we made the very conscious decision to scale with Plasma. We wanted to optimize for True Ownership, and Plasma offered the appropriate security guarantees to ensure that. Choosing Plasma was not the easiest decision — we knew it would be a long and tedious process and that other L2 solutions were more readily available. So when we were finally able to deploy Plasma Dog in November at DevCon on testnet and see everything finally come to fruition, we felt exceptionally validated and proud. The OmiseGO team put in endless amounts of work to design and implement the network, and we provided them with support and testing to prove that it could process a scalable transaction volume. It did, and when we re-released Plasma Dog for the Ari Alpha deployment in February, we were able to easily process more than 32k transactions in the first 24 hours for just a couple hundred dollars in testnet Ether. Q: What exciting things have you achieved on the network? A: One of the most interesting things we’ve been able to do with Plasma Dog on the OMG Network is prove the concept of “streaming money.” Most blockchain games today are turn-based. And in many ways, this is more due to the costly constraints of blockchain, rather than a stylistic decisions of the game designers. Plasma changes this by dramatically reducing the costs for on-chain settlements. With Plasma Dog we demonstrated this advantage by immediately depositing coins into the player’s wallet as soon as they were collected in the game. Because Plasma can process all player transactions into a single bulk settlement, we are able to offer players with a more high-fidelity gaming experience, which feels closer to the types of games they’re used to playing.Q: We’ve heard about this new game your team is developing, could you tell us more about it? How is it going to be different from Plasma Dog and what should the public expect from it?A: Our newest game is called My Memory of Us. It was originally released by Juggler Games in October last year on Steam, Xbox One, Playstation 4, and the Nintendo Switch. It is the first integration to come out of our private alpha developers’ program, and it is set for re-release on Steam later this quarter for the first time with True Ownership. The game is a 2D puzzler set in a dystopian, alternative history meant to reflect real events that took place during World War II. While Plasma Dog was really a proof-of-concept, MMoU has an entire mythology for players to immerse themselves. The storyline and narration are truly works of art in their own right, and our biggest expectation is we believe My Memory of Us will elevate the genre of blockchain gaming to be more focused on unlocking new types of “fun” rather than speculation. Q: What do you look forward to doing on the OMG Network? A: I’m excited to re-experience something from the early days of Bitcoin: cheap transactions. This might sound simple and boring, but it’s actually quite profound. We used to brag about how it would cost users less than a penny to send any amount of money to anyone anywhere in the world at anytime. That value proposition reduced the barrier to mass adoption more than most A: people might appreciate. Early adopters were fearless in transferring even small units of value around the network just to test new services. We need that fearlessness again, especially now that we have an even richer ecosystem to explore in Ethereum. Imagine how significant this will be when it’s transposed to the world of video games — we will need players to be just as fearless in exploring their virtual worlds with their virtual assets with anyone at anytime. That will be how we get successful blockchain games. Q: What OmiseGO technology are you excited to develop on? A: The fiat on-off ramps enabled by the OMG Network and wallets are going to be some of the most exciting pieces of infrastructure to develop on. They’ll probably be the first instruments that help connect the virtual worlds of video games with the real world. Players will be able to raid a village one evening in their favorite game and spend their digital loot at their local cafe for a cup of coffee the next morning without even thinking about it. That type of experience will be novel and exciting. It will benefit both gaming culture and the blockchain ecosystem as a whole.Q: With the technology Hoard and OmiseGO is building where do you see the world of gaming heading?A: True Ownership is going to cause the real world to merge with virtual worlds. We already see how interconnected reality has become with social media –imagine this happening with games. When a critical mass of games are eventually built on the same (for lack of a better term) “payment rails” as assets in the real world, then value from games can be extracted in new and meaningful ways. In the not-so-distant future, a “happening” in a video game will have as much influence over a real-world event as an outrageous selfie or tweet at an award show.Try out Plasma Dog HERE*EDIT: Corrected erratum stating that Plasma (Jun Hasegawa’s Dog) is a Labrador. Plasma is a Golden Retriever.Community Partner Chris from HOARD was originally published in OmiseGO Network on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

OmiseGO

19. 05. 22

Next Station Samrong: OMG N...

We are happy to announce the newest release version of our Network, `Samrong` — the second iteration of the OMG Network. In this iteration, we’ve applied the learnings and improvements we’ve made since the launch of Ari.What’s so special about Samrong ?We made drastic improvements on Samrong in terms of the resilience of its services. In other words, our network is becoming more reliable, monitored and less prone to downtime when faced with high network load. Aside from the uptime improvement, we also added more features to it. To name a few:New transaction signature using EIP 712 standard, allowing you to sign transactions through wallets like MetamaskFrequently requested meta-data field, allowing businesses and decentralized applications to store any arbitrary data into their transactionsWe also made significant modifications to the Plasma smart contract itself. It will be MoreVP specification compliant. Since this is a written smart contract that cannot be modified, we will be implementing Samrong as a separate network from Ari.So there are two networks? What’s going to happen to Ari?Ari will be up and running for the meantime. However, the network will be brought down in favor of the application development, client library and block explorer to provide their support on Samrong. We will be counting down the days to its closure, which will be signaled by the completed transition of our partners on the Network. This leads us to the next exciting phase: testing our very first plasma network upgrade! Users and applications will have to move their Rinkeby ETH and ERC20 from Ari to Samrong. This of course includes the users of Plasma Dog. Don’t worry, the OmiseGO team will help make the shift as seamless as possible.We will begin by providing developers of the ODP with private alpha access to Samrong. With private alpha access, developers will have the tools they need to start migrating their funds to simulate the actual process of fund migration between networks. If you are interested to get involved early, please sign up to be part of our ODP here. Stay tuned as we carry out this roll out!Next Station Samrong: OMG Network v0.2 was originally published in OmiseGO Network on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

OmiseGO

19. 05. 19

AMA 23: OmiseGO x Hoard

AMA 23: OmiseGO <> HoardPart 1 of 3 of OmiseGO AMA special with community partner HOARD.We said we’d be changing things up a bit with our AMAs, so at the beginning of this month we gave the community an opportunity to speak to one of our community partners HOARD — the creators of the first OMG Network application: Plasma Dog. We received a lot of great questions for HOARD regarding their work, working with OmiseGO, and the future of the gaming industry. HOARD has answered all your questions, so we’re breaking it up into three separate posts.This is part 1 of the 3 part AMA series.Q: What made you choose OmiseGO?Malf: We can cooperate on improving Plasma with our ideas instead of just using technology.Cyryl: The most advanced work on Plasma MVP. A big benefit is that part of their team is working in the same office we do so the communication is great :)Radek: First of all, we prefer solutions where it’s possible to exit to a stable chain like Ethereum. So when a plasma chain user wants to move their tokens to Ethereum mainnet and then to any other layer two solution, they can do so whenever they want to. Second, OmiseGO plasma is the only working, professional layer two solution on Ethereum.Q: What benefits do you see for Hoard in using OmiseGO network?Cyryl: Speed and throughput are one thing. Secondly the possibility to customize logic for collecting fees from transfers. And last but not least, the possibility to transfer users tokens to and from the main Ethereum network on demand (which gives users an additional security level). This is why we have chosen Plasma instead of other possibilities. Of course there are features we need to implement on top of Plasma, like NFT support or token state support, and before choosing Plasma we had to evaluate how hard it would be to implement those features. As of today, NFT support is done (although not yet integrated into the main branch). We would like to use the official OmiseGO network instead of our own plasma deployment so players have access to OmiseGO special features like fiat and other crypto currency conversions.Q: What did you like the most or the coolest thing about the OmiseGO SDK?Radek: During the Plasma integration process, we used omg-js library and we haven’t experienced any problems. We also received strong support from the OmiseGO team. For other programming languages (C#, C++) we had to implement our own libraries in C# and C++.We think the coolest recent thing about the plasma integration was the deployment of Ari testnet on Rinkeby. We were able to switch Plasma Dog to Ari and gave our players additional experience on the Ethereum testnet where they can exit (move their tokens back to Ethereum mainnet) now. Moreover, we plan to provide additional functionality in Plasma Dog, allowing users to consolidate and move their tokens to the Ethereum Rinkeby testnet with “one click”. This will be an additional interesting use case for us and the OmiseGO team when thousands of players will have to consolidate their UTXOs and redeposit them to the new plasma chain.Q: Can you explain us benefits and differentiation of using Hoard marketplace instead of Steam or it’s alternatives?Malf: We are building a platform that is focused on both players and game developers. They don’t have to be crypto-experienced, as we can retro-fit blockchain solutions to existing games — like My Memory of Us, by Juggler Games. With our platform we want to build a scalable ecosystem where games can interact with each other and ultimately, in the future, become part of the so-called Metaverse.In the beginning we want to focus on carefully chosen games that will use interoperability between each other. The more interesting games will populate our ecosystem — the more opportunities of interesting gameplay, True Ownership and other blockchain goodies (like items with independent stories written in blockchain, perma-death or in-game mercenaries contracts) will be there.Developers will be able to introduce fees on all the trades (including renting), while content creators, thanks to the royalties system, will have their part of the pie. We also want to bring crowdfunding opportunities tailored for game developers and leveraged blockchain inherent security features (e.g temper-resistance, lack of single point of failure) to defend ourselves from scams.Q: How do you think Steam will jump in the blockchain arena? Future competitors or potential partner?Malf: I perceive all the existing platforms like potential partners rather than competitors. The game industry is so huge that there is space for everyone.Q: What restricts a malicious player (cheater/hacker) from transferring or trading his item tokens? Scenario: A cheating player is banned from a game, but has amassed a lot of item tokens. Will he be able to make a profit? Are there any possible restrictions by a “trusted party” to prevent this misuse?Cyryl: We wouldn’t like to disallow anyone trading or transferring in general, but developers will be able to prevent some actions in the game ie. by blacklisting malicious accounts. Also we can ban such players from making trades on our exchange portal. The question is, should we? I think such cases should be solved case-by-case in cooperation with game studios. This certainly requires more discussion since censorship might be required but is not well perceived.Q: If, and when do you plan on issuing tokens. Also, what utility would the token have?Malf: We plan to issue the HRD token this month, so pretty soon!Regarding token utility: The Hoard Network maintains a number of stakeholders, including game developers, players, investors, community participants, video game service providers, and even Hoard, the company. Primary token utilities are (but not restricted to): fees, benefits and platform tiers, which are the part of services like marketplace and crowdfunding platform. Benefits will be mostly related to game developers and actual games while through the Tier System our platform will reward token holders by giving them access to more and more features. Both Tier and Benefits mechanisms are possible thanks to enhanced staking logic.Q: The progress of OmiseGO is quite slow now. Are you satisfied with their existing progress? Can the existing OMG SDK build your final product and how long will you take to build it?Radek: We don’t think that the progress is slow. They do a lot with improving plasma MoreVP and adding support for different transactions formats. Moreover they work on DEX working with plasma MoreVP. We know that a significant amount of work related to plasma is research, which can look like a lack of progress from the outside, but we know that they do a really good job now.The current OmiseGO plasma implementation is used by Plasma Dog, but for more advanced integration (game-blockchain) it requires support for more token types in plasma. We will work on it together with the OmiseGO team.Curious about Plasma Dog? Try it out for yourself HERE.Want to keep updated on HOARD projects follow them on Twitter.Read more about our community partner HOARD through our feature with Chris, HOARD Community Manager, in our April 2019 Newsletter.Don’t miss out on PART 2 and 3 of the OmiseGO x HOARD AMA by following OmiseGO on Twitter.AMA 23: OmiseGO x Hoard was originally published in OmiseGO Network on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

OmiseGO

19. 05. 14

Plasma Boostrap

Plasma BootstrapHackathons and workshops are events where OmiseGO is able to share our tools with our community. EDCON 2019 with its EDCON HACK was a prime stage to showcase our product and have other developers build on our network. While at EDCON HACK we encountered a developer duo that was building on the OMG Network –Adrian Li and Kendrick Tan, the team behind Plasma Bootstrap. What the OmiseGO team liked about Plasma Bootstrap is that it added value to the experience of those working on the OMG Network. It was a simple solution to the lack of real-time activity visibility while working on elixir-omg, our production repo of the OMG network. Adrian and Kendrick experienced difficulty debugging their work. According to them, “(they) felt that the experience required better metrics, data, and documentation, so we thought it would be a nice project to create something that would ease the pain for the community.” This inspired them to develop Plasma Bootstrap.Plasma Bootstrap enables users to deploy a local plasma chain easier by providing a simple Graphical User Interface (GUI) to generate the terraform/bash scripts needed to deploy a plasma chain on either a cloud provider (e.g GCP, AWS, etc), or a local Linux machine. This is done instead of having to navigate around a terminal and editing the docker-compose file to start up the app. There is then a coupled analytics suite and alert system to help users diagnose issues, should they occur. During the 48-hour hackathon, Adrian and Kendrick built on top of elixir-omg to provide analytics and real-time feedback from the OMG network to the user. They also constructed a web-app that allows users to generate several deployment scripts easily. According to them “(they) thought that having an intuitive, easy-to-use, one-click solution would provide an experience that is rarely seen in the current crypto space.”Under the stress and pressure of a hackathon, the team behind Plasma Bootstrap found that understanding and debugging the existing Elixir + Python codebase to be one of the most challenging parts of the build. With the time constraints, Kendrick and Adrian were unable to add all the features they would have wanted. Given more time, the duo would have added in a component to easily browse and search the logs of the plasma server –instead of just metrics. While the duo has certainly added value to the network, they have also come to appreciate the OMG Network and learned from the build. When asked the question: “What has building Plasma Bootstrap made you learn about working on the OMG Network?” They said: “A lot of effort has been put to ensure that plasma works as it should, and we are really excited about the future of plasma. We hope that we can contribute to making plasma easy-to-use and more user-friendly for developers from all walks of life.” More info on Plasma Bootstrap: Language, tools and Framework used:React (for the UI), Docker, Terraform, Prometheus, Grafana, Flask (for prometheus exporter), Web3 (for ENS support). Source codes:Plasma BootstrapFrontend and Terraform Want to build on the OMG Network? Sign-up for the OmiseGO Developer Program (ODP)***Originally published on the OmiseGO April 2019 Newsletter ***Subscribe to our newsletter herePlasma Boostrap was originally published in OmiseGO Network on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

OmiseGO

19. 05. 10

OmiseGO April 2019 Roundup

CEO AnnouncementApril was ushered in with the announcement of our new OmiseGO CEO, Vansa Chatikavanij. Along with the restructuring in Omise leadership, Jun Hasegawa, now Omise Holdings CEO, also discussed the role OmiseGO plays as a subsidiary of Omise Holdings moving forward.OmiseGO happily welcomes Vansa into her new role as CEO. We now work towards her vision, priorities and business goals for the company which she laid out in her blog.Tech Updates:OmiseGO eWallet SuiteIn April, the eWallet team focused on two main items: research and the design of Potterhat; a multi-client Ethereum data service, and continuing development towards the release of eWallet v1.2.During our first update for the month, we announced improvements on getting account members and keys end points, updating the Android POS Client Wallet dependencies and refractor, and we were able to release iOS SDK 1.2.0.beta.1. We fixed a few bugs like the issue of CORS config #871, the bug on Android POS Merchant Wallet #46 and random test error in WalletControllerTest #872. Early to Mid-April saw the team attending two conferences: ElixirEU in Prague and EDCON in Sydney.At the end of the month, we finished our two-week sprint cycle and put out a pre-release of the 1.2 version of the eWallet. The pre-release now has features that enable more use cases — especially for smaller providers. The design and implementation of the Potterhat PoC is in progress. This PoC is beneficial for both the eWallet and network node as it improves the reliability of Ethereum clients. This is a slightly challenging task because relying on multiple clients can either significantly reduce downtime, or significantly increase the chance of error.For more details, check out OmiseGO eWallet Suite updates #21, #22 and #23Plasma UpdateAfter weeks of testing Ari together with our partners from the OmiseGO Developer Program we felt that Ari reached a level of functionality and stability that was ready for public testing and feedback. As such, in early April, we announced our alpha release Ari becoming public at EDCON.During the second half of April we continued to monitor Ari’s public performance. The work on this “post-Public Alpha” has been focused on improving our support for running production service while still on PoA. There has been some cleaning up on documentation to ensure easy and accurate usage. Better monitoring of the health of our services has also been looked into by decoupling internal services within the childchain and watcher. Some features we’ve worked on this month would be the adding of ERC-712 signing support, ERC-20 exit support, Parity Node support, and UTXO management.For more details check out Plasma updates #17 and #18Public Alpha AnnouncementThis month we invited the public to test on Ari and to provide feedback that would be vital to the network’s development.The version of the OMG Network available to the public implements More Viable Plasma for ETH transfer and Minimal Viable Plasma for ERC-20 token transfer, with a single operator, secured against the Rinkeby Ethereum Testnet. It supports the full plasma lifecycle — deposits, transfers, exits, and in-flight exits. In our testing, we’ve already been able to process over 1.2MM transactions with a peak measured throughput of over 2700 transactions per second so far.As mentioned in the initial announcement, this version, an Alpha release, has a few known bugs that will soon be fixed with a Network Update that is currently under development.EDCON 2019OmiseGO was at EDCON! We were in Sydney as a sponsor of EDCON HACK 2019. There, we participated in a hackathon –our engineering team was there as mentors and we had Thibault, eWallet team lead, as one of the judges. Pong, Product Manager at OmiseGO, gave a workshop on how to conduct transactions on the OMG Network during the second day of the hackathon.During the main conference Pepesza Peregud, Software Developer at OmiseGO, gave a talk on the security threats that centralized cryptocurrencies experience and how OmiseGO is exploring hybrid solutions that look to extend the security of plasma for asset exchange.Find out what else happened at the land down under by checking out our blog.Events to look out for:May 24–26 2019 — SURGE, BangkokMay 31- June 2 2019 — CryptoChicks Hackathon + Blockchain & AI ConferenceOmiseGO April 2019 Roundup was originally published in OmiseGO Network on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

OmiseGO

19. 05. 01

OmiseGO at EDCON 2019

G’day mates! As you may know, EDCON is an annual Ethereum community event and this year, it was held in Sydney, Australia. In addition to the three-day main conference, the community organized “Sydney Blockchain Week,” a series of social events, meetups and a pre-conference hackathon (EDCON HACK).The OmiseGO team was there again this year and we sure had a good time meeting community members, learning from other projects and sharing with others what we have been building.Just very briefly, here is a recap of what we did.EDCON HACK, April 8–10The EDCON HACK was a 48-hour event that focused on technology implementation and innovation for Ethereum ecosystems. There was a contest on the most innovative builds within the 48 hours given, with prizes up to US$10,000. The event was open to hackers of all skill levels and they were given access to online workshops that happened before the main event, which offered information and knowledge on the tools to be used during the actual hackathon. OmiseGO engineers served as mentors to the hackers and Thibault, Lead Engineer was also a judge.Congrats to the Cryptokids — Bronze Champs! 🏆“It was interesting to watch what a very diverse group had to offer. It shows that the ecosystem we are working in cuts across a range of demographics, from age to interests. We had the Cryptokids who are in the blockchain space at a very young age, men and women coming together to form teams and groups that had specific interests such as Twitch Plays Pokemon on Plasma — their project demonstrates a growing interest in sidechains.”-Thibault Denizet, Lead Engineer, OmiseGO and EDCON HACK 2019 JudgeA series of workshops were held throughout the hackathon and were designed to aide participants with their work. On the second day (April 9), Pong, Product Manager and a key team member behind the OmiseGO Developer Program (ODP) gave a workshop on building scalable applications with OmiseGO. And during the OmiseGO workshop, we announced that our alpha release, Ari is going public! 🚆OMG Network ArchitectureEDCON April 11–13The main conference was a venue where concepts, developments and ideas within the blockchain, fintech and Ethereum communities were shared and exchanged. The aim was to boost communication and interaction of Ethereum communities worldwide and accelerate the sound development of the Ethereum ecosystem.The conference kicked off with the standard registration and opening ceremony which involved a song and dance number by Vitalik Buterin, Founder of Ethereum and other Ethereum members. This was followed by an update on the state of Ethereum’s development and the ecosystem. The afternoon included a panel discussion on “Decentralizing economies and funding the commons”, which included Vitalik, Michael Faye, Co-founder of Give Directly, and Althea and Kelsie of OmiseGO.Decentralizing economies and funding the commons panel discussion.On the second day of the conference, Pepesza, Software Developer, OmiseGO, gave a talk entitled, “Building the OMG Network: Plasma and Securing Exchanges on Plasma.” He walked the audience through the security threats that centralized cryptocurrencies experience and how OmiseGO is exploring hybrid solutions that look to extend the security of plasma to asset exchange.A slide from “Building the OMG Network: Plasma and Securing Exchanges on Plasma”.On the final day, the OmiseGO team listened to other projects’ talks and had more time to interact with members within the Ethereum community.We’d like to thank the organizers for putting together an awesome event! This was a long journey for many of us, but we were thrilled to find a vibrant blockchain scene when we arrived; not to mention great coffee and some pretty excellent weather. It was a great opportunity to connect with community members we have never met before and were able to share and exchange knowledge and experiences on the technology we are building and will continue to build on in the years to come.Speaking of community members, we were able to meet Jet86m in person! Jet86m is none other than our OmiseGO community mod extraordinaire and valued team member. Because some of our team members are remote, the only chance to meet them is through events such as EDCON. Here is a more detailed recap of OmiseGO at EDCON and reflections from the point of view of a first-time attendee, and Australian local, Jet86m: Reflections on EDCON 2019.OmiseGO at EDCON 2019 was originally published in OmiseGO Network on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

OmiseGO

19. 04. 26

Community Program — Pong Ch...

Community Program — Pong Cheecharern (ODP)Pong, Product Manager at OmiseGO is the person behind the OmiseGO Developer Program (ODP). Being the point person for the program, he is the first contact between Alpha testers and OmiseGO roll-outs before they are released to the public in Beta. As of March 2019, a month after ODP’s release, 100 developers have been on boarded. They are now building, testing and contributing to the improvement of the network. This month, we talk to Pong and get to know more about him and the ODP. Question: Hi Pong! Could you tell us about yourself and your work at OmiseGO?Pong: My name is Pong and I’m a product manager at OmiseGO. I focus specifically on the OMG Network. My responsibility is around APIs, integration libraries and bringing in real world product feedback in order to improve the quality of life for application developers that are looking to utilize our network. Q: How did the ODP start and what prompted its start?Pong: I see the ODP as a part of the natural progression of the products we are building. Once software reaches a certain level of maturity, you will start to want usage. However, for something like the OMG Network, we can’t rely on a typical startup mantra, like Facebook’s famous “ship fast and break things”. When building a financial infrastructure, you want to be sure things will work as expected –the network handles people’s money in digital form, the network needs to be highly secure and robust. On the other hand, you need to know that the infrastructure works in the real world and is stress tested. The ODP is a means to do both. It provides information garnered from real life situations through real users. In this case developers.Q: What does your team envision the ODP to be in the long run?Pong: In the long run, beyond the goal post of the Public Alpha release, I see ODP as a potential sandbox for a variety of different types of early stage products. For example, during the past month, we worked on plasma-cli, a tool that enables developers to interact with OMG Network from the command line. We see it as a useful tool, yet can only approximate how developers would react to it. This is where the ODP is useful — to test and gauge reactions through real users. In the long run we see the ODP as a means to test and build solutions based on what we have on hand and ensure that there’s as little friction as possible. It is also most beneficial to developers looking at integrations in the long term. Software evolves over time, and as someone who builds on the application layer, you will want to keep your pulse on the development of the network.Q: How does the ODP work?Pong: Currently, we have an ODP form. The process is that first the applicants sign up for the program through the form. These applications are reviewed by the product team for consideration. The team looks at their history in development, what they are working on, and so on. This is an important step to ensure that we are on boarding developers who are serious about testing and building on the network. Once accepted, we send each batch a simple integration guide with endpoints to Ari for them to test sending transactions to. They are also invited to join a Gitter channel where they can communicate with the OmiseGO engineering team. This is currently on a rolling basis. We are also looking forward to more personal engagement with teams and individual contributors in the future.Q: Where did most of your enlisters come from? Do you know any of their backgrounds and goals?Pong: Currently, the majority of enlisters come from the OMG community. are web developers or dApp developers. Ideally, we want people who are looking to build applications that utilize the OMG Network. I think an early access program like the ODP would provide a lot of value to people with specific requirements for scalable payment applications.Q: What sort of interaction do you hope to get with people who enlist?Pong: The program is still in its early stage, but we do get decent traction. There are people that have read our guide and successfully made transactions on our Alpha release. There are a few who ran into issues or bugs, and they are very communicative and we are able to track all of the problems, which is great. In the future, I would like to identify what it is that the developers in the ODP want to build and find a way to support their needs a little more. Q: What do you hope to learn from the ODP?Pong: I hope we will be more informed in the future about how application developers would like to use our network, including their specific use cases. This information will certainly help create bigger and better iterations of the network. A network is only as useful as the applications running on top of it. Q: There’s a lot of interest in what OmiseGO is doing right now and what the teams are working on. Where can people go to stay updated?Pong: First off, for developers I think to best way to get information on our projects would be through the ODP. This way, they would get first-hand information on our products by experiencing it for themselves. Second, I would suggest that people follow us on twitter at @omise_go, read our blog and subscribe to the monthly newsletter.Community Program — Pong Cheecharern (ODP) was originally published in OmiseGO Network on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

OmiseGO

19. 04. 20

OmiseGO Roadmap Update

We’re closing the first quarter of 2019 with a roadmap update. So here’s what’s new:For the decentralized exchange (DEX), we’ve marked PoC DEX Phase 1 as completed. We continue to document its performance and are testing the viability of the DEX. This stage of the engineering process includes the plugging in of the proof-of-concept (PoC) into Ari, testing the performance of the DEX and Ari; and performing test measurements. With test measurements, we are measuring the DEX’s performance by observing and documenting its capacity and number of trades possible, and its characteristics which include the time it takes to place an order and settle a trade. For our upcoming tasks, we’ve added a focus on Restricted Custody Proof of Design, which looks into different design options that can be used to ensure that the funds held in the DEX are safe. We’ve made progress on the development of the OMG Network with the completion of our Alpha release (Ari). The Beta release is still in progress, this cycle focuses on stability and upgradeability. New features being worked on include support for ERC-712 and visibility of payments that are in progress. PoS Design Phase 1 is ongoing, and includes the reviewing of Honte PoS design, assessing other PoS mechanisms and assessing PoS variations. The focus on this has been eased to make way for other features that will generate greater network traffic before fully implementing PoS. PoS Phase 2 which involves the final selection and definition of PoS is upcoming. Tesuji Plasma Mainnet, Hybrid PoS and Full PoS are on the pipeline. These items may not follow a chronological order of progression as they may be worked upon in tandem. Development of the eWallet Suite has progressed with the completion of several iterations of eWallet 1.0–1.1. Version 1.2 is in development as of March 2019. This will be followed by eWallet 2.0 with Ethereum integration.***Originally published on the OmiseGO March 2019 Newsletter ***OmiseGO Roadmap Update was originally published in OmiseGO Network on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

OmiseGO

19. 04. 13

Public Alpha Announcement

We’re excited to open up access to an Alpha release of the OMG Network to the public for the very first time. We’ve spent the past few weeks working with our partners and members of the OmiseGO Developer Program to test and validate the network. We’ve named this network Ari (อารีย์) which, in Thai, means hospitable, gentle, and accommodating. We believe that Ari has reached a level of functionality and stability that is ready for public testing and feedback. We hope that you’ll find it hospitable and accommodating.This version of the OMG Network implements More Viable Plasma for ETH transfer and Minimal Viable Plasma for ERC-20 token transfer, with a single operator, secured against the Rinkeby Ethereum Testnet. It supports the full plasma lifecycle — deposits, transfers, exits, and in-flight exits. In our testing, we’ve already been able to process over 1.2MM transactions with a peak measured throughout of over 2700 transactions per second so far.Please note that this is still Alpha software. There are known bugs that we’ve already patched but have not deployed. This includes issues that could make the contract insolvent. We will be performing a network upgrade to deploy these fixes and additional features in the coming weeks. We decided to perform the update after this launch so that we can invite public participation and feedback about the process.Keep posted on our Alpha release updates and its announcements through our new Developer Portal at developer.omisego.co. The portal is home to announcements, documentation and links to everything you need to get started integrating with and developing for the network –including channels for support and your feedback.We look forward to hearing from you! Happy shipping!Public Alpha Announcement was originally published in OmiseGO Network on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

OmiseGO

19. 04. 09

OmiseGO March 2019 Roundup

Tech Updates:PlasmaThe first two weeks of March were devoted to onboarding developers to the OmiseGO Developer Program (ODP). Response to the program has been great so far and we are looking forward to see more engagement with our community of developers. This time with the initial operation of Ari, we discovered a bug with our connectivity to Ethereum Client. We have since implemented a workaround to allow the services to function normally. We continue to monitor their performance.During the latter half of the month, we completed the development of a few features,cleaned code and fixed bugs. We completed two main developments. The first main development is the UTXO (Unspent Transaction Output) management, which is the transaction model employed with our MVP framework. This feature allows users to merge UTXOs without having to pay extra fees; drastically improving the UX of making complex transactions. The second development is the adding of support to an arbitrary data field in transactions. The arbitrary data field allows transactions to be used for additional purposes rather than just UTXO transfers. This enables applicability of transactions across a wider range of use cases.We continue to learn about our alpha testnet through the validation phase. We’ve run into some issues and have implemented bug fixes. As it goes with engineering, the continuous and careful monitoring of our network will allow for better iterations in the future.For more details check out Plasma updates #15 and #16OmiseGO eWallet SuiteThis past month, we added a few blockchain features; the most notable feature offers users the ability to generate an Ethereum account within the eWallet. With this feature, one can easily set up an account that can be used from within the eWallet and interact with the Ethereum blockchain without having to switch screens or applications. Another feature is the permission system which was merged and integrated throughout the app. What this means is that it will now be easier for eWallet developers to check a well-defined set of rules for user access in one place instead of having to search through the entire codebase. This feature paves the way for the creation of custom roles and permissions for providers as well.In addition to the above features, we designed a new admin panel. The focus of the redesign is to give administrators a better experience when managing accounts. The redesign of the admin panel offers more flexibility, giving administrators the ability to view more account specific details at the launch of the application panel.Previous DesignUpdated user interfaceLastly, we focused on completing the development of eWallet version 1.2. We made minor bug fixes and worked on the client keys feature that offers the ability to function without a master account and offers balance-viewing permissions. The team explored ways to make blockchain integration seamless, dedicating time to finding the right architecture and interface, and how to support blockchains other than Ethereum in the future.For more details, check out OmiseGO eWallet Suite updates #19 and #20Pre-EDCON WorkshopPong Cheecharern, Product Manager at OmiseGO and mentor at EDCON2019 Hackathon (EDCON HACK) gave a pre-EDCON talk on Microtransactions on Plasma Chain earlier this month. In the video, Pong talks about several aspects of microtransactions on a plasma chain and specifically how these transactions can happen on the OmiseGO Network.In case you missed it, learn more about the workshop details here.Boston Consulting Group — Future of Payments, SingaporeVansa, Managing Director, OmiseGO, was part of Boston Consulting Group’s Future of Payments panel in Singapore. Vansa was joined by representatives from Lazada, UOB, Monks Hill, Visa, and the Senjo Group. The panel discussed the evolution of payments, value added services and the role of eWallets and blockchain in our increasingly global economy.Vansa shared with the audience, OmiseGO’s role in the future of payments. Blockchain is seen as a big player in the payment ecosystem of the future, and OmiseGO’s products (OmiseGO eWallet Suite and OMG Network) will help people operate within this ecosystem. The OmiseGO eWallet Suite serves as the mobile gateway, whereby people can connect to the network and conduct transactions. Th OMG Network will enable interoperability of wallets, currencies, tokens and payment networks.Events to look out for:April 8–13 — EDCON 2019, SydneyApril 8–10 — EDCON HACK, SydneyWe’re going to be at EDCON!OmiseGO is a partner and sponsor of EDCON HACK in Sydney. OmiseGO product manager and engineers will serve as mentors at the 48-hour hackathon and Kasima, Director of Engineering will participate as a judge. Additionally, OmiseGO is organizing a workshop on how to develop transactions on the OMG Network. The workshop will be conducted by Pong on the second day of the event.Building the OMG Network: Plasma and Securing Exchanges on Plasma — EDCON Main Conference (time TBA)Pepesza Peregud, Software Developer,OmiseGO, will give a talk on the security threats that centralized cryptocurrencies experience and how OmiseGO is exploring hybrid solutions that look to extend the security of plasma to asset exchange.OmiseGO March 2019 Roundup was originally published in OmiseGO Network on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

OmiseGO

19. 03. 31

EDCON HACK: Making Micro Tr...

Pre-EDCON online workshopPong Cheecharern, Product Manager at OmiseGO and mentor for EDCON2019 Hackathon (EDCON HACK) gave a pre-EDCON talk on Microtransactions on Plasma Chain. In the video, Pong talks about several aspects of microtransactions on a plasma chain and specifically how these transactions can happen on the OMG Network.https://medium.com/media/362b6749190d70210990bb26be136794/hrefThe focus of the OMG Network is a plasma chain that enables micro payments, peer-to-peer transactions, which are carried out on the network for low fees. In the video we learn about the use cases on the OMG Network. Two of the more prominent use cases mentioned were video gaming and loyalty points.For the video gaming use case, one can tokenize in-game assets and trade assets with in-game users, as what we see with Hoard’s Plasma Dog. The second example is the loyalty point use case. Loyalty point programs are commonly employed by businesses that seek higher customer engagement. While large companies tend to keep points confined within their own brands, SMEs tend to seek interoperability of points with other brands in their area. Blockchain technology is seen as a tool that can help eliminate silos. The benefit for companies that utilize the OMG Network is that they will enable their customers to trade and use their points with other businesses within the same payment rail.An interesting possible use case mentioned is the Proof of Existence (PoE). The PoE is one of the first non-financial use case within the OMG Network. It can take assets such as land titles and allow you to digitally store them on the blockchain. Once stored, you can verify data such as data signatures, where it is on the blockchain, who was last to handle it and more to show that this item exists and what transactions it has been part of.Another point tackled in the pre-EDCON talk was the Plasma world map, showing the different variations and implementations available as of the end of 2018. For OmiseGO, we use the MoreVP plasma design; a variation of Plasma MVP authored by Vitalik, which is under the UTXO-based plasma.To close, Pong talks about the three major functions of the plasma chain: deposit, transact and exit. The deposit function sends a value to the plasma chain, then there’s a registration of a new event of a token being deposited. Once done you can see a new UTXO emerge on the blockchain. The transaction would be the exchange of assets within the plasma chain. The Exit allows a safe exit of funds from the plasma chain.As a precursor to EDCON 2019, the video invites viewers to be a part of the workshops and hackathon at the event. The following are links to resources for the hackathon:OMG-JS | JavaScript Client LibraryJS-Starter-kit | Minimal Client side Browser WalletFor those who won’t be able to join us in Sydney at EDCON 2019, please note, we are inviting developers who are interested to explore the OMG Network through the OmiseGO Developer Program (ODP).EDCON HACK: Making Micro Transactions on a Plasma Chain was originally published in OmiseGO Network on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

OmiseGO

19. 03. 29

pwolf88 — Community Spotlight

pwolf88 — Community SpotlightPwolf88 has been an active member of the community since 2017. A regular contributor to the OmiseGO subreddit, Pwolf88 and the team at OMGPool have created valuable resources for the OMG community like the OmiseGO News Feed, his explanation of Plasma, and the staking rewards calculator. This month, we get to know Pwolf88 and how the OMGPool team work together for the good of the community.Question: First of all, are you a developer?pwolf88: I used to be. As a child, I was already living with a father and two brothers that were all obsessed with computers and technology. In college, I studied programming but after a couple years of experience, I soon realized I was more interested in the business and analytical part of things. I learned to program in Solidity though, but that was more to get a feeling of the technologies. I leave the actual coding to the experts.Question: What got you interested in blockchain, how did it start?pwolf88: A friend of mine told me about Ethereum in the summer of 2017, but mostly from an investment point of view. At that time, the whole concept of cryptocurrencies was just a big casino to me. I quickly decided to learn the fundamentals behind it, before losing even 1 dollar on it. Soon™ I discovered the enormous potential of smart contracts and Proof-of-Stake consensus networks, which led me to research OmiseGO. After getting involved in the OMG community, I was offered to join the OMGPool team, as it is developing in a very organic way with members of the community.Q: How does your team work together?pwolf88: We all have different backgrounds and skills, and are all working in the same direction so each task is dispatched quite easily. We are also a small team, so we can adapt quickly to our needs. It’s amazing how people can cooperate almost effortlessly, when they all believe in the same thing and have the same goal in their mind.Q: What projects have your team completed and are proud of?pwolf88: The Staking Rewards Calculator on our website is often referenced in the community for rewards speculation and it will be even more useful when staking is live to estimate revenue for stakers, just like mining calculators do for miners. But the thing we’re most proud of is how we’ve integrated with the community and can respond to the needs that various members may have. For instance, we implemented the OMG News Feed because we believed that there was just too much ‘fud’ on Reddit and other social networks that could kill the interest of new people wanting to learn about the fundamentals of OMG in a healthy manner.Q: What OmiseGO technology are you excited to develop on?pwolf88: We’re most excited about the entire reason OMGPool exists: Proof-of-Stake. It’s a superior incentive model to Proof-of-Work, both in its economic model and its technical sophistication. We hold the belief that over time, Proof-of-Stake systems will become the dominant crypto platforms because of their practicality and accessibility, especially through the use of smart-contract-enabled staking pools where you still hold true ownership over your assets, as opposed to entrusting them to a custodian.Q: What use cases are you looking forward to see using the white label eWallet?pwolf88: One day I would like to experience the opportunity to collect loyalty points from local and online businesses I use as a customer, or to cash out my crypto assets to fiat money in a local shop.Q: What inspires you when writing for the community? What brings about interest in doing so?pwolf88: I love to write about topics that are so new and groundbreaking. If I think about the potential of blockchain in this digital revolution we’re living in, it feels like we’re way overdue and we need this more than anything to really get started with things like smart cities, machine coordination, and virtual reality. To me, the digitalization of payments is crucial, but it’s only a first step towards this bigger world we’re about to see.See what pwolf88 and OMGPool are working on by visiting their WEBSITE and MEDIUM PAGE. Stay in the loop by subscribing to their EMAIL LIST and TELEGRAM GROUP.Originally published on the February 2019 issue of the OmiseGO NewsletterSubscribe to our monthly NEWSLETTER HERE.pwolf88 — Community Spotlight was originally published in OmiseGO Network on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

OmiseGO

19. 03. 16

Get with the Program

The OmiseGO Developer Program (ODP)The OmiseGO Developer Program (ODP) is an initiative that is part of the product development process. The objective of the ODP is to systematically and carefully facilitate usage and thorough testing of Proof-of-Concepts (PoCs) and early stage products in order to gain feedback for improvement. The program is aimed towards those who would like to build their own products, such as games, financial service applications, and education platforms on top of the OMG Network. Applicants of the ODP will fall into the developer category and are willing to work with unpolished and early stage codebase. Early testers and integrators are given early access to the new products OmiseGO rolls out. Those in the program will also have opportunities to interact with each other and with the engineering team. ODP application timelineThe ODP is an ongoing program and applications are accepted on a rolling basis. The goal is for ODP participants to participate as Alpha testers for roll-outs before they are released to the public in Beta. What this means is that there is no real definite timeline or start and end dates. While we have no definite dates set, here’s what we have planned out within the next three months: End of February to beginning of April 2019:1. Whitelisted access to the Alpha release of the OMG Network with integration guide2. Access to a JS Starter Kit to start making transactions quickly on browsers3. Communication channel established with OmiseGO Engineers4. Early access to a ‘Getting Started Guide’ to the OMG Network Aside from this expect other supporting services and libraries in other languages to be rolled out as well. Beyond the alpha and beta Releases of our network, participants can expect interactive discourse with the product and engineering team at OmiseGO, including opportunities to share your opinions on what product and features you would like to see and build that will make your life as an integrator easier. Given that acceptance to the ODP will happen on a rolling basis, the acceptance criteria is subject to change with each phase of development. Applicants who have applied and have not gotten accepted can still expect to be contacted in the future.Sign up for the OmiseGO Developer Program today.Get with the Program was originally published in OmiseGO Network on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

OmiseGO

19. 03. 05

OmiseGO February Roundup

Alpha release (Ari)In February, we debuted our Alpha release (Ari) at ETH Denver. Ari is the conclusion of the current stage in our development cycle. It is the point in which we’ve become ready to start using our Plasma MoreVP implementation on a public Ethereum network with users.Ari, being on a public Ethereum network now allows us in tandem with partners, to test the integration of third-party apps with our Plasma MoreVP network. At ETHDenver Hoard ran an iteration of Plasma Dog with a limited-edition Bufficorn skin for the Hackathon.The Alpha release enables us to rigorously test and search for bugs on the network together with our partners like Hoard. Being on a public network allows more developers and entities to use and test our product allowing for a well-rounded feedback mechanism for creating iterations faster. In the first 24 hours of Hoard running their application on our network, we were able to test the capabilities and capacity of our system. Over 28.5k transactions were processed during that time.Read more about Alpha Release (Ari) on our blog.OmiseGO Developer ProgramTogether with the debut of Ari, we launched the OmiseGO Developer Program (ODP). The ODP is an initiative that is part of the product development process. The objective of this program is to facilitate the usage and thorough testing of our releases and other products.The ODP is an ongoing program and applications are accepted on a rolling basis. The program is aimed towards those who wish to build their own applications and programs on top of the OMG network. Early testers and integrators are given early access to test new products OmiseGO rolls out. As part of the program, testers and integrators can interact with one another and with the OmiseGO engineering team. There will also be opportunities to provide feedback, comments, and suggestions on what products and features should be built to make developer integration easier in future iterations.Sign up for the OmiseGO Developer Program todayTechnical UpdatesPlasmaEarly in the month, our engineers focused on the development of the in-flight exits for ERC-20s and transaction metadata support, and updated Elixir and our Exthereum dependency. The team monitored the performance of our testnet on Rinkeby. Satisfied with the overall network performance, the initial updates to omg-js were merged. In the process, several bugs involving geth were identified and fixed.The biggest news for February is the implementation of the Plasma MoreVP on a public Ethereum network –alpha release (Ari).For more details check out Plasma Updates #13 and #14OmiseGO eWallet SuiteWe start off the month of February with the release of eWallet version 1.1.0 of the iOS SDK. This version allows the iOS apps to utilize the eWallet’s v1.1 features, such as user signup and login, and password management directly from their apps. This update also enables providers to setup their eWallet system without an intermediary application that stores and manages users.During the second half of the month we focused on hashing out the technical design and strategy for Ethereum integration. This was a challenging task as it required consensus on how the eWallet would interact with the Ethereum network; everything from how public and private keys would be generated, stored, and retrieved for transaction signing, the strategy to operate on potentially thousands or more wallets, syncing token information and transactions and handling unexpected connectivity issues.Additionally, we also worked on the Elixir 1.8 and Ecto 3.0 upgrades. These items, though invisible to users, ensure that the backbone of the eWallet codebase will continue to receive the latest features, security and bug fixes.We started on our initial blockchain integration which determines how the eWallet generates new blockchain wallets. This lays the foundation of how the eWallet would interact with a blockchain client to retrieve wallet balances, tokens, perform transactions, and much more.And finally, we have worked on finalizing the scope and tasks for eWallet version 1.2 and v2.0 cycle. This marks the beginning of the Ethereum integration work which a lot of us have been anticipating.For more details on what the team worked on in February, check out eWallet Updates #17 and #18Mobile Money and Financial Inclusion Feb 26–27 2019OmiseGO’s Business Development Team presented the next generation financial services for mobile money to better serve end-users in Myanmar. Photo credit: ©Magenta Global EventsEvents to look out for:March 3, 2019 — Plasma Application Workshop | Making Micro-transactions on a Plasma chain (Online Workshop)March 8, 2019 — Future of Payments — Boston Consulting Group (BCG), SingaporeApril 8–10 2019 — EDCONHACK (workshop), SydneyApril 11–14, 2019 — EDCON, SydneyOmiseGO February Roundup was originally published in OmiseGO Network on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

OmiseGO

19. 02. 28

Tousthilagavathy — Develope...

Tousthilagavathy — Developer SpotlightTousthilagavathy has been a member of the OMG community since October 2017. As an active member on the OmiseGO’s reddit, he has developed content made available to the OMG community including a comprehensive ELI5 OmiseGO whitepaper. This month, we got to know a bit more about Tousthilagavathy, his background, and how he got interested in the network.Question: What got you interested in developing, how did it start?Tousthilagavathy: I got hooked the first time I was introduced to computers at a young age. Programming fascinated me. I’ve always found abstraction, logic and deduction to be interesting. So, I guess that helped with the interest. I started developing with the Basica and C programming languages to do simple graphics.Q: What is your development process?Tousthilagavathy: Most of the development I do involves quite a bit of abstraction and research, so I follow the iterative development process it’s a lot of repetition till I’m happy with my design. I also use Scrum, for managing my product development.Q: What projects have you completed and are proud of?Tousthilagavathy: While I’ve completed a lot of projects, I have to say I’m most proud of having designed and programmed engines to do automation, simulations of crowds and worlds. And also I’ve done system programming related stuff like memory managers, process managers and custom scripting languages.Q: What projects are you currently working on?Tousthilagavathy: Currently I’m working on a networking-based web app that has elements of social, business, payments and incentives.Q: What OmiseGO technology are you excited to develop on?Tousthilagavathy: I like the currency agnostic, crypto, DEX and scalable aspects of the OmiseGO tech.Q: What opportunities do you want to explore on the white label eWallet?Tousthilagavathy: I want to look at payments of course and play around with the various forms of incentivization. These functions are in line with the current work I’m doing, so it could be cool to explore the eWallet.Q: What inspires you when writing for the community? What brings about interest in doing so?Tousthilagavathy: I just like sharing my knowledge with the community. Sometimes the inspiration is purely accidental, for example, some time back when Givedirectly was tweeted about by OmiseGO, I got to thinking about it one evening and for the fun of it, I had written out the distribution logic on my blog.See more of Tousthilagavathy’s work HEREOriginally Published in our January 2019 NewsletterTousthilagavathy — Developer Spotlight was originally published in OmiseGO Network on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

OmiseGO

19. 02. 20

OmiseGO eWallet Suite Demo

https://medium.com/media/e93f8d88fc1798e90d7a16e2c738d9ba/hrefThe OmiseGO eWallet Suite is a white label, open-source, and fully customizable eWallet to digitalize and store all types of assets. What does this mean?First of all, being white-label, the eWallet is yours to brand as your own. Second, as it is open-sourced and fully customizable, you can change and develop it to suit any need you may have. You may use it to store company loyalty points, employee benefit points, game tokens, cryptocurrency, or even fiat.creating a token on the eWallet SuiteWhile the eWallet Suite can certainly stand alone on its own without having to be linked to the decentralized exchange (DEX), it was created with future integration into the OMG network in mind. This is where it can truly shine. With OMG network integration, a company can offer multiple transactions at high speeds. The decentralized exchange enables interoperable trade of different types of assets be it points, fiat, crypto, or any other asset that has been digitalized and stored on the OMG network.In the video Thibault, Integration Lead Engineer at OmiseGO, walks us through the various features of the eWallet Suite, and show us how the eWallet and its features may be used in the real world.Learn more about the eWallet Suite here.Read up on the latest eWallet development updates here.Originally Published in our January 2019 NewsletterOmiseGO eWallet Suite Demo was originally published in OmiseGO Network on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

OmiseGO

19. 02. 18

OmiseGO’s Alpha Release (Ari)

We’re happy to announce our alpha release aka Ari! Here is an update on how we arrived at Ari and what it is.What happened after Devcon 4?Back in October 2018 while we were running our implementation of Minimal Viable Plasma (MVP) at Devcon 4, we gained valuable insights into the operation and performance of our services. We even had our first production incident during the conference, which we mitigated to keep the services live. One of the key elements of software delivery is getting performance and operational information from the deployed code and using that to make data driven decisions that ensure that the services we are building are resilient for users. This continued iterative process is essential for ensuring the safety and trust in our network, which is paramount to us. After all, this is a network that is transacting real world assets which have value.What was the incident at Devcon 4?When we deployed the blockchain services that power Plasma Dog, we also deployed Quest — a service to view transactions on the network in real time. The Watcher stores network transactions in a relational database. Quest connects to the Watcher to get the transactions that have been verified. We had configured the client-side library of Quest to poll the Watcher every 15 seconds to get an updated list of the transactions on the network. This means that if a user left a browser tab open, they would continue to make API calls to get two hundred of the latest transactions per request. When we had several thousand users on Quest continually requesting updates the transaction data, we quickly exhausted the resources available to us on the database. The CPU on the database pegged at 100% and refused further connections, the Watcher could not connect to the database and failed, causing the Quest service to fail too. Fortunately as we have a separate Childchain and Watcher architecture, the blockchain continued to be operational.CPU usage of the database that the Watcher uses.This graph is the CPU usage of the database that the Watcher uses. Shortly after it hits 100% utilization, you can see at 2:45 where the database refuses connections in an attempt to shed load, which it does successfully (causing the failure of the Watcher). At 2:52 we restarted the Watcher, only for it to fail again 5 minutes later due to the volume of requests. During the period between 3:00 and 3:20, we determined that the lack of CPU resources was causing this failure condition and re-provisioned the database to handle the load we were experiencing. At 3:24 services were operational again.We continued to monitor how the services were performing and at 4:25 we could see an increase in the CPU load again. From the Watcher’s monitoring data we could see that several requests per second were coming from an API call associated with Quest’s transaction polling API. We deployed a hot fix on Quest to change that behavior, with the trade-off being that users would have to refresh the page manually if they wanted to view the updated transaction data. After we deployed that, at 4:43, the database CPU load started to reduce.Database CPU load reducing.In the following weeks after Devcon 4, we redesigned our service deployments and began the process to implement Plasma MoreVP. Some of the highlights from this time are:We launched our Childchain and Watcher services on the public Ethereum test network Rinkeby.We discovered techniques that meant we could reduce our gas usage on the root chain (including not writing empty blocks to the rootchain and a modifying the gas price selection mechanism).The service deployment was redesigned to be more tolerant to failure conditions that we identified during and after Devcon 4.Continuous integration and deployment of the blockchain services was implemented to provide faster signal to developers of an error condition.The public APIs were redesigned to be consistent across all of the services in the OmiseGO ecosystem, which helps for eWallet integration.We found a whole range of bugs, including a serious one where blocks weren’t being written to the root chain.The Plasma smart contracts, Childchain, and Watcher were engineered to implement Plasma MoreVP.TerminologyWe’ve switched from calling these releases the internal and external testnet to alpha and beta, respectively. We’ve been using this terminology internally for some time and we’ll be using it publicly from now on as well. We’re building software and we’d like to follow the software release life cycle naming convention. It offers more clarity on where we are in terms of our software development stage. Alpha denotes software that is complete enough for internal testing, which is typically carried out by people other than the software engineers who wrote it. Testers can include individuals within the same organization or community that developed the software. Beta test is the second phase of software testing where we’ll be opening access to everyone.What is the alpha release (Ari)?The alpha release, which we’ve nicknamed Ari (see name explanation below), concludes the current stage in our development cycle. We feel we’re in a good place with our builds, deployments, and smart contract development where we’re ready to start using our Plasma MoreVP implementation on a public Ethereum network with users. This allows us in tandem with partners, to test the integration of third-party apps with our Plasma MoreVP network. Hoard will be using our test network Ari at ETHDenver!To celebrate ETHDenver and the launch of Plasma MoreVP, Hoard has developed a limited edition Bufficorn Skin for the hackathon. Thank you to Hoard for pioneering this program, thus far, and a shout out to the Burner Wallet team! Check Hoard’s blog post for more details on the More Viable PlasmaDog on Rinkeby and how players at ETHDenver can authenticate their Plasma Dog session with their NFT Burner Wallet to unlock the playable Bufficorn skin.Getting to this point has taken a lot of hard work and dedication to overcome the issues we’ve discovered while building. Here are some of the challenges that we’ve found and addressed along the way in 2019 alone:In certain conditions exits from the Plasma chain were unchallengeable. This meant that anybody could deposit to the Plasma MoreVP contract, perform an exit, and the entire chain would become invalid. This results in a denial of service (DoS) condition which would have taken down the whole network for everyone.A race condition on the Watcher start-up was discovered where unchallenged exits were processed before other modules of the system started. This meant that for users running their own Watcher, it would appear the chain is faulty (has a byzantine condition) — which would prevent normal operation, including transactions.We found a bug where an attacker could drain all the ETH from the deployed Plasma MoreVP contracts.Protection against re-orgs on Ethereum has been added to the Plasma MoreVP contracts.We implemented a flexible deployment mechanism for deploying services in production or locally on a developer laptop.Support was added for other components of the exit game including in flight exits and piggybacking.We’re really excited to be at this stage of the development and look forward to more load on our Plasma MoreVP services as part of the OmiseGO Developer Program (ODP). The ODP is an ongoing program of early testers and integrators who will be given first access to our products, documentation and tooling.View our transaction explorer and keep track of the OMG Network Status (Ari)!Why Ari? 🚋 🚋 🚋The naming convention for test Ethereum networks is to use train stations. Rinkeby and Ropsten are stations in Sweden, Kovan is a station in Singapore. When we turned up the environment that was used for Devcon 4, we were huddled in a hotel room as we deployed the services and ERC20 tokens that would be needed by Hoard to operate Plasma Dog. During this, we realized we didn’t have a name for the network. We checked on a map and just around the corner from the conference center was Vyšehrad station. So that’s how we named that one.We wanted to continue the naming convention with our alpha release and decided it was time to put Bangkok on the map. Ari is: 1) Easy to say for non-native Thai speakers, and 2) Can also mean “hospitable”, “accommodating” or “gentle”. Please be gentle with our test net. 😄What’s next?We’re going to continue the same iterative process that we’ve been building with to date. All software has bugs and we will not rush releases or perform any activity that has the potential to compromise user safety. The next version (beta) of our network will be a publicly available release that anybody can use! We’ll use the beta phase to observe real-world usage and look for bugs or flaws that haven’t been discovered in the alpha phase. We’ll deploy the network to mainnet when, and only when, the code has been thoroughly tested and audited and we are confident that it’s a safe place to put real money.We’re currently planning a video workshop pre-event and a face-to-face workshop ̶h̶a̶c̶k̶a̶t̶h̶o̶n̶ during EDCON HACK, which takes place this April in Sydney, Australia. We will have a bug bounty in place to catch more bugs and security vulnerabilities as a part of the process of getting ready for mainnet. We will develop more tooling around the interaction with services and the status of the systems we’ve deployed — eWallet Plasma integration. Stay tuned for more details.Want to get involved?If you would like to get even more involved with the next stages of development and building, we’re hiring!Stay updated. Connect with us.Follow us on Twitter :Connect with us on FacebookSubscribe to our newsletterOmiseGO’s Alpha Release (Ari) was originally published in OmiseGO Network on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

OmiseGO

19. 02. 16

OmiseGO January Roundup

Technical Updates:PlasmaThe new year started off strong with a new iteration of the internal testnet. The improvements were based on the data and feedback received from the initial iteration. Our goal is to create a production environment that is resilient and can handle real-world continuous usage. While not the easiest task to do, we’ve made our first step in that direction with this version.To ensure that we are prepared to open up to the real world -with multiple users, interactions, and connections, we’ve set up means to better study and view the chain, and develop iterations of it faster. The internal testnet is now fully monitored and instrumented with telemetry, logging, and exception reporting -allowing for faster feedback mechanisms and fixes. While we believe to have created a stronger environment now, we continue to actively test the new environment to build towards further resiliency.The second half of January was focused on our More Viable Plasma (MoreVP) implementation. With our focus on MoreVP we are looking to ensure user funds (in ERC20) are safe. In line with that, we’ve been integrating the in-flight exit support from the root contracts into the child chain and watcher.The MoreVP has all the production support services that we set up with our new internal testnet. Again, what this means is that we can continue to test and validate data and create solutions and new iterations faster. Along with our heavy security testing, we’ve also created an API format, which is consistent across the child chain, watcher, and eWallet so that it’s cleaner and more developer-friendly.To get more details on our work in January check out our Plasma Update #11 and #12eWalletFor January we focused on the release process of eWallet 1.1. This entailed continuous testing, several bug fixes, and the thinking up and applying of last-minute features to add. We will continue to do this process till we’re satisfied with everything for release.Of the accomplishments we’ve had in January there are three that stood out the most for the eWallet team:First, it would have to be the finalization of the ‘Activity Log System’. This is an important feature that allows the users of the eWallet to know the exact details of all activities done. Users will be able to see who did what and when they did it. A good feature for accountability and an added measure of security.Second, we’ve developed a better build process, which includes running the E2E tests. This is a great addition for developers as this provides a better and faster feedback loop. Working with this type of feedback loop will allow us to spot problems and fix them, ensuring less bugs are deployed into the staging system.And last but certainly not the least, we have the CSV exports for transactions. While we may have not added any major features this month, the CSV export would have to be the closest one to it. This feature, which was initially required by one of our eWallet-using enterprise customers, provides the ability to export transactions for accounting purposes. Users can export any or all transactions that have been made.To get all the details on our work in January check out our eWallet Update #15 and #16ShinhanCard Proof-of-concept demohttps://medium.com/media/8a5594bc613fd352e009127888c4e0d1/hrefThis was an exciting month for us as our exploration into possible technology applications with ShinhanCard has borne fruit. After months of collaboration with OmiseGO, the Korean Finance conglomerate demonstrates a cross-border PoC with the aim to expand the acceptance of ShinhanCard’s loyalty program to international markets and enable borderless interoperability.This demonstration shows the first ShinhanCard transaction using OmiseGO. Should ShinhanCard choose to adopt the OMG Network with merchant acceptance, users would have the ability to interchange local loyalty points with other merchants and customers on the network across borders and eventually exchange between any digital asset, as per the design of the OMG Network.Read more about the ShinhanCard Demo on our BLOGOmiseGO shares Ethereum address in WBTCSharing our Ethereum address is another step towards greater transparency with our community. This address will be used to sign transactions for the WBTC DAO for public record. The move allows our community to see and audit our activity online.Learn more about the WBTC HEREOmiseGO Newsletter revamp.We’ve decided to reformat our monthly newsletter. We’re making it your end-of-month one-stop-shop. Subscribe to get access to our monthly round-up of events and tech updates, links to OmiseGO and community news, special announcements, and all new newsletter-exclusive content.Click here to SUBSCRIBEOmiseGO welcomes Dennis KellerOn a mission to continually grow and strengthen our team, we’re always on the lookout for the right talent. And in January of 2019 we are proud to announce that we have brought Dennis Keller on board.Prior to joining OmiseGO, Dennis Keller worked in the globally leading telecommunications company Telenor, across Asia, Eastern Europe, and Scandinavia. As the Director and Head of Commercial he was driving the understanding and value of digital services and products. This meant being at the forefront of the future of mobile services, shaping existing and new opportunities.He’s a former telco investment strategist in emerging markets globally and worked in advisory for the largest single investor in Eastern Europe and Central Asia. Aside from this Dennis has been extensively involved in the startup world, as investor and (co-)founder of several startups, most recently a luxury fashion outlet in Indonesia. He has been an active advisor, both for startups and for NGOs and international organizations such as UNDP and OECD.Here at OmiseGO Dennis Keller is now the Vice President of Commercial and Business Development. His role is to lead partnerships and commercialization for the company. This includes analyzing trends and market needs to build strong business development and commercial strategies, conducting deep-dives to identify, analyze, qualify, and provide justifications for new markets OmiseGO would enter, while developing and guiding new business opportunities.We’re hiring. Be the next to join the OmiseGO team!The Binance Conference, Jan 19–22 2019OmiseGO was at the Binance Blockchain Week. Dennis Keller and Jeremy Lam were in Singapore to learn and contribute to the future of the blockchain ecosystem.Jeremy, our OmiseGO product lead, spoke at the Binance conference as part of a panel that discussed “Security and Privacy: Building a SAFU Future”. The panel looked into the best industry practices when it came to security and privacy, as well as personal tips for individual safety, and of course how technology could be implemented to create a safer environment for stakeholders.Events to look out forFeb 26–27 — Mobile Money and Financial Inclusion, YangonOmiseGO January Roundup was originally published in OmiseGO Network on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

OmiseGO

19. 01. 31

ShinhanCard Demonstrates Pr...

Shinhan use case demoIn April of 2018 ShinhanCard signed an MoU with OmiseGO to explore opportunities in fintech and blockchain initiatives. Since then, OmiseGO has been collaborating closely with the company to exchange learnings and increase capacity to adopt blockchain technologies.In January of 2019, that MoU has resulted in a use case that demonstrates a cross-border Proof-of-Concept (PoC) aimed at expanding the ShinhanCard loyalty program internationally and enable borderless interoperability.https://medium.com/media/8a5594bc613fd352e009127888c4e0d1/href***This video has sound***The demonstration on video is based on a transaction of digital assets of tokenized value that are minted to represent ShinhanCard’s reward point. Shinhan Financial Group is one of the largest banking groups in South Korea in both assets and profit. The ShinhanCard reward point can be used in almost any online and offline merchant in South Korea, and if the card holders of ShinhanCard purchase products in the company’s payment app, called ShinhanPay FAN (Finance and Network), users can receive extra benefits from partner companies of ShinhanCard.In this scenario, FAN points are minted on the blockchain through a smart contract on the Ethereum network, deposited into a Plasma blockchain, and transacted on the Plasma blockchain from the merchant (ShinhanCard) to a user.For this demonstration to test and showcase their PoC, Shinhancard engineers use OmiseGO’s web interface for enterprise developers, which allow basic interactions with the OMG network. The interface mimics the functions of an eWallet suite and allows a developer to grasp the concept of plasma, and make direct, fast transactions.For the purposes of the demonstration, the interface does not include the watcher or exit functions of a plasma blockchain. The eWallet iteration with the watcher and exit functions are relatively new additions which you can learn more about HERE.Should ShinhanCard choose to adopt the OMG Network with merchant acceptance, users would have the ability to interchange local loyalty points with other merchants and customers on the network across borders and eventually exchange between any digital asset, as per the design of the OMG Network.This PoC was helpful in allowing the ShinihanCard team to really understand what they could potentially do with plasma and blockchain itself. With that OmiseGO and ShinhanCard look forward to furthering research, learnings, and development together.ShinhanCard Demonstrates Proof-of-Concept was originally published in OmiseGO Network on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

OmiseGO

19. 01. 28

Community Update - December...

It’s that wonderful time of the year again. Winter is finally here (summer in other places). If you’re reading this, thank you for staying with us.There are a few days left before we cross over to 2019, so before we look forward, let’s take a moment to look back at 2018. The road was long and winding for us at OmiseGO, with a number of achievements and a handful of challenges; some we were prepared for, others, we learned the hard way.As always, our fate is tied in many ways with that of Ethereum and the wider blockchain industry, and it has been an eventful year across the board. Ethereum 2.0 is under heavy development, bringing sharding and other improvements to the Ethereum blockchain. Plasma research has emerged as a community-wide effort toward better on-chain scaling for a wide variety of use cases. This type of collaboration between projects is one of the most remarkable and rewarding aspects of working in an open-source community, and the Ethereum space in particular, and we’re proud to have been leaders in the effort.As things move fast and not necessarily within a straight path in our industry, we’d like recap our activities from January 2018 right up to present day. We aren’t able to pack every single detail of a year in one post, but here are some key highlights.January 2018The first Plasma minimum viable product technical specification is announced and the Proof-of-Concept (PoC) is created and iterated upon.February 2018eWallet Suite repo is made public! Read here.March 2018OmiseGO announces a donation of $1m USD equivalent in OMG to GiveDirectly, an organization that provides aid to populations living in extreme poverty in the form of direct cash transfers to individuals — and with it our intention to explore the possibilities of using crypto to support these and other efforts to help the poor.Plasma Cash, a Plasma construction is proposed as a scalability option that turns fungible assets into unique “coins” on the root chain. This increases security and usability but adds a new challenge as well: it requires each coin’s entire history to be tracked, which involves storing and transmitting a tremendous amount of data. Reducing history size to make increase the viability of Plasma Cash is a subject of ongoing research.April 2018 The eWallet Suite (SDK) is publicly released (Sente on the roadmap).OmiseGO announces MoU with Shinhan Card to further advance Shinhan Card’s digital offerings across its portfolio of payment services and mobile application in today’s growing mobile payments market.May 2018OmiseGO creates a PoC to explore the details of how the improvements of Plasma (Cash) can be incorporated into the OMG protocol.June 2018Neutrino, the blockchain co-working and community space, an initiative of OmiseGO, launches in Japan and Singapore.July 2018eWallet SDK comes out of beta with the 1.0.0-pre0 release.OmiseGO and Status announce technical partnership. Status plans to leverage the OMG DEX by integrating the OMG Software Development Kit (SDK) into their native wallet, allowing us to test out early implementations of the SDK and DEX on a powerful decentralized platform. Read more about the collaboration here.August 2018The OMG Network repo becomes public, including instructions for anyone who would like to download the child chain server and watcher (software which monitors the behavior of the Plasma chain and root chain). Read more here.September 2018OmiseGO shares their DEX design and approach with the public.October 2018Omise Holdings announces that it has raised an undisclosed amount of funding from Japan’s largest private venture capital firm, Global Brain, with participation from 31 VENTURES, CVC arm of Mitsui Fudosan and returning Indonesian venture capital, SMDV. Funding is allocated to OmiseGO as well.Quantstamp completes audit of OmiseGO’s MVP implementation.November 2018Devcon4, the biggest Ethereum gathering of the year takes place in Prague with around 3,000 attendees — representatives of hundreds of projects as well as many thought leaders and independent developers. This year’s conference was particularly energizing and productive; the community was more enthusiastic and hopeful than ever.OmiseGO’s internal testnet is announced to the public and tested for the first time via Hoard Exchange’s Plasma Dog game at Devcon 4. The game is built on Tesuji Plasma (a milestone), which is the first release of the OMG Network and the first implementation of plasma by OmiseGO. Tesuji Plasma’s design is based on Minimal Viable Plasma (MVP).Read more about Hoard’s experience working with the testnet here.OmiseGO announces partnership with MVLchain, the mobility blockchain protocol behind TADA, Singapore’s first blockchain ride-hailing service. The partnership is to develop a POC to verify the suitability and performance of the OMG Network for TADA’s data record-keeping system.December 2018Minimal Viable Plasma testnet is being redeployed following a rebuild. Once all the feature development is completed for MoreVP, the testnet will be upgraded to MoreVP. This is the version that, once OmiseGO is satisfied with it, goes on to become the public testnet. On Plasma, read more here and here, and follow the team as they advance towards external testnet.eWallet version 1.1 is right around the corner. Version 1.1 contains key features needed to begin integrating the eWallet with Ethereum and later plasma, as well as added functionality and user experience improvements. Keep an eye on the eWallet waffle board or the eWallet v1.1 tracker.Communications and CommunityWe are doing more to open up communication between the OmiseGO team and the OMG community, and have looked to our community to determine how we might improve.In July we kick-started our monthly community updates along with technical updates from the eWallet Suite and Plasma teams. If you aren’t able to follow our weekly updates, you can also track the issues we are working on using the GitHub tracker. It is an easy way to stay up to date on our progress. For those who visit our Reddit, you may have seen our weekly AMAs, where we answer the top five questions each week. If you have any questions for the team drop them in this week’s AMA! We hope these initiatives have helped, and are always looking for new ideas. If you have any suggestions or feedback, please let us know.ReflectionsWe’ve experienced both challenges and great progress over the past year. Open sourcing the eWallet was a major achievement. The OMG Network repo becoming public was a big step and even bigger was when we first deployed the child chain for production load at Devcon 4 via Plasma Dog (see November 2018 above).In hindsight and in between, we learned immensely as a tech company that is developing software that aims to enable people to access financial services. We’re operating in uncharted territory and at every turn, there is a lesson waiting for us to learn.We’re grateful for the resilient, innovative and united Ethereum community as well as our working partnerships with Status, Hoard, MVL, Quantstamp and Shinhan Card. We value the connections we’ve made with developers, businesses and other projects in the blockchain space and in the coming year, we will engage more with key audiences.OmiseGO is growing as a company as we move forward with our strategy. We have solid teams of technology and financial professionals, a clear roadmap and plan of action. We’re ready to take on each challenge and look forward to the new year.We will be at the Binance Conference in January. We’re on a panel! Come listen, say hi, ask questions. We’d love to see you.“Look over yonder, hooman. I smells a 2019.”Before we go, we’d like to acknowledge the role community plays in this open-source initiative and what the OMG Network stands for. We extend a heartfelt thanks to the OMG community. 2018 was a year of many ups and downs. We take these learnings forward with us into the new year and strive to do better. Thank you, thank you, thank you for your support. See you in 2019.Happy holidays!OmiseGO TeamCommunity Update - December 2018 was originally published in OmiseGO Network on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

OmiseGO

18. 12. 27

Update: GiveDirectly’s find...

‘Phase 1 Findings: Stateless Payments for Stateless People’You may recall that in March this year, OmiseGO, together with Ethereum Founder Vitalik Buterin, donated the equivalent of $1 million USD tokens to GiveDirectly, to facilitate the transfer of currency directly to people living in extreme poverty. The project that OmiseGO funded is specifically focused on enabling research into the impacts of direct giving to refugee populations.With Phase 1 of the project to deliver large, unconditional transfer of cash to refugees complete, we’re able to draw insights from the research and field work of GiveDirectly to enable our mission to facilitate disintermediation and provide access to financial networks to unbanked populations.A GiveDirectly field officer enrolls a new recipient to receive cash transfers in Kenya. ©GiveDirectlyPilot ProjectPhase 1 of the project was an operational pilot to test the feasibility of delivering large, unconditional cash transfers to refugees in Uganda and gather illustrative evidence of user behavior and impact. This initial pilot is being used to inform a follow-on proof-of-concept in Rwanda and a large-scale third-party evaluation in Uganda, which will deliver cash to an entire refugee settlement (10,000+ households) and produce rigorous quantitative evidence on the social and economic impacts.What sets this project apart is the provision of contextually large, unconditional, one-time direct transfers. The effectiveness of this methodology when compared to other humanitarian aid approaches is proven. For example, it was found in one study that 70% of Syrian refugees elected to receive aid in unrestricted cash over food vouchers.[1]GiveDirectly distributed $660USD each to 4,371 refugee and host households in Uganda, roughly equivalent to one year’s worth of World Food Programme rations. Funds were disbursed to local host communities as well as refugees.Pilot Project FindingsGiveDirectly’s findings from the first phase of the pilot reinforce the thesis of direct transfer of value to achieve positive outcomes on local community development.Most importantly, the pilot proved that large cash transfers to refugees is eminently feasible. Following a locally deployed sign-up campaign and education on mobile pin management, payments were delivered digitally, through mobile money and a local banking partner. Recipients safely received them, with losses to theft and other adverse events at just 0.15% share of total transfers. Economic markets responded, with local agent networks emerging to providing cash out services. New jobs and increased trading of goods and services indicates a strong local economy.Cash transfers provide refugees, one of the most constrained populations in the world, with a unique degree of choice. Around a quarter of the value was used to cover immediate necessities, such as food, clothing and paying off debts. The remaining three quarters went to longer-term investments, such as housing, livestock, businesses or education.Unforeseen circumstances during the pilot demonstrate the benefits of enabling users to maintain agency over how they spend their own funds. Just before receiving the transfers of cash, refugees had their farmland repossessed by the Ugandan government in order to house new arrivals of refugees in the region. The proportion of the refugee population engaged in subsistence farming and commercial farming fell drastically. Unconditional cash transfers, rather than predetermined aid solutions such as food vouchers, allowed people to adapt and choose how to meet daily needs and diversify income sources.If unrestricted direct cash transfers were the default mode for humanitarian assistance, research suggests that their share of the humanitarian budget would be roughly four times bigger.The full report on activities and outcomes from GiveDirectly is available here.Implications for OmiseGOOmiseGO’s donation contribution is going towards a larger scale project to deliver cash to an entire refugee settlement in 2019 which will be followed by a rigorous external evaluation of impact.The research and evidence from GiveDirectly’s work is extremely important to forward the vision of delivering mobile financial transactions at scale for financial self-sovereignty and understanding user adoption prerequisites and behaviors in local contexts.We are living in the highest levels of displacement in human history. An unprecedented 68.5 million people around the world have been forced from home. Among them are nearly 25.4 million refugees, over half of whom are under the age of 18. There are also an estimated 10 million stateless people who have been denied a nationality and access to basic rights such as education, healthcare, employment and freedom of movement.[2] The availability of financial networks to access credit for housing, services and businesses is crucial.[3] In this sense, accessible financial systems are key to unleashing the vast potential of the urban poor to improve their living and working environments and livelihoods and addressing human inequality.OmiseGO is deeply appreciative of the on-ground efforts and open research of GiveDirectly. We will continue to utilize the findings of GiveDirectly’s work in the field to inform our understanding of mobile money network adoption in underserved markets, education of local communities for mobile money adoption, and cash-out behaviors in given contexts to reach end users.Call To ActionAgain, we would like to use this opportunity to raise awareness of GiveDirectly’s efforts and invite the OMG community to participate.For financial contributions, GiveDirectly accepts ETH or ERC20 tokens to this Ethereum address.We also welcome engagement from development sector experts and local community groups, especially in Southeast Asia, to help inform market engagement and effectively serve local communities.Blog Credits:GiveDirectly Team for inputs.GiveDirectly blog: https://www.givedirectly.org/blog-post?id=8598277768732857358Full report: https://givedirectly.org/pdf/CashTransfersToRefugeeCommunitiesWhitePaper.pdf[1] United Nations World Food Programme, ‘Food — Restricted Vouchers or Unrestricted Cash? How To Best Support Syrian Refugees in Jordan and Lebanon?, April 2017.[2] https://www.unhcr.org/figures-at-a-glance.html[3] The Challenge of Slums, Global Report on Human Settlements, UN-Habitat, 2003, 166.Update: GiveDirectly’s findings from the field and what it means for OmiseGO was originally published in OmiseGO Network on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

OmiseGO

18. 12. 19

Transaction History
Transaction History Market Market Transaction volume Address
IDCM OMG/BTC 1,195.78 4,847,677,001.37 Short cut
Coinall OMG/BTC 1,191.30 2,526,495,926.33 Short cut
DigiFinex OMG/ETH 1,201.05 990,956,287.84 Short cut
BitForex OMG/USDT 1,197.09 859,313,558.31 Short cut
Cat.Ex OMG/ETH 1,198.55 433,756,945.06 Short cut
CoinEx OMG/BTC 1,202.57 393,883,930.00 Short cut
BW.com OMG/USDT 1,197.16 281,211,914.85 Short cut
TOPBTC OMG/ETH 1,191.12 194,373,721.88 Short cut
Dcoin OMG/USDT 1,178.17 194,044,976.05 Short cut
55 Global Markets OMG/ETH 845.91 187,979,070.72 Short cut
CoinTiger OMG/BTC 1,185.61 176,040,093.22 Short cut
BITHUMB OMG/KRW 1,187.00 158,677,033.09 Short cut
UPbit OMG/KRW 1,185.00 156,085,183.35 Short cut
DragonEx OMG/USDT 1,203.82 132,063,895.15 Short cut
Bitrabbit OMG/ETH 1,193.86 105,552,017.50 Short cut
Vebitcoin OMG/TRY 1,201.77 98,989,774.64 Short cut
HitBTC OMG/ETH 1,200.29 94,733,140.00 Short cut
MERCATOX OMG/ETH 2,949.53 68,932,991.21 Short cut
Huobi Global OMG/BTC 1,215.14 60,815,734.59 Short cut
ZB.COM OMG/USDT 1,212.56 53,627,563.70 Short cut
IDAX OMG/BTC 1,195.31 53,113,194.78 Short cut
CHAOEX OMG/ETH 1,199.30 52,330,800.67 Short cut
Bitkub OMG/THB 1,169.27 36,857,319.89 Short cut
Coinsuper OMG/BTC 1,190.29 35,826,562.35 Short cut
Binance OMG/BNB 1,204.05 31,846,629.82 Short cut
Hubi OMG/ETH 1,189.02 30,586,599.64 Short cut
Sistemkoin OMG/ETH 1,206.87 28,676,870.84 Short cut
OKEx OMG/ETH 1,200.02 25,547,888.88 Short cut
Hotbit OMG/ATOM 1,183.24 20,340,740.24 Short cut
CoinPlace OMG/BTC 1,362.42 19,713,519.84 Short cut
Kyber Network OMG/ETH 1,210.41 19,549,542.01 Short cut
EXMO OMG/USD 1,229.71 18,938,936.86 Short cut
GDAC OMG/KRW 1,180.00 16,987,824.00 Short cut
Bitrue OMG/ETH 1,192.59 8,683,845.86 Short cut
Neraex OMG/BTC 980.39 8,326,949.97 Short cut
LocalTrade OMG/USDT 1,171.04 5,512,156.87 Short cut
Bittrex OMG/USDT 1,212.91 4,503,185.10 Short cut
Coineal OMG/ETH 1,037.73 2,895,898.67 Short cut
Bancor Network OMG/BNT 1,202.32 2,736,227.78 Short cut
Bitfinex OMG/ETH 1,199.18 1,512,867.73 Short cut
Gate.io OMG/ETH 1,192.70 1,042,287.65 Short cut
Coinbit OMG/BTC 969.29 750,775.19 Short cut
Bitbns OMG/INR 1,634.23 647,415.15 Short cut
Kucoin OMG/ETH 1,206.19 543,825.72 Short cut
Huobi Korea OMG/ETH 1,195.34 327,667.45 Short cut
LiveCoin OMG/BTC 1,205.37 250,990.59 Short cut
Bitsane OMG/ETH 2,761.89 241,534.05 Short cut
AirSwap OMG/ETH 3,079.77 153,988.48 Short cut
LiteBit.eu OMG/EUR 1,192.52 71,461.74 Short cut
EtherDelta (ForkDelta) OMG/ETH 1,690.55 52,331.09 Short cut
WazirX OMG/BTC 1,214.21 38,733.17 Short cut
BitMart OMG/BMX 1,263.89 26,313.99 Short cut
Crex24 OMG/BTC 1,187.67 19,253.78 Short cut
Ethfinex OMG/DAI 948.33 5,492.09 Short cut
Koinex OMG/INR 969.87 2,521.66 Short cut
GOPAX OMG/BTC 1,227.44 1,227.44 Short cut
CredoEx OMG/CREDO 3,315.19 9.88 Short cut
FCoin OMG/ETH 1,202.38 0.00 Short cut
BitBay OMG/BTC 1,255.31 0.00 Short cut
GBX Digital Asset Exchange OMG/ETH 1,016.96 0.00 Short cut
COSS OMG/ETH 1,204.81 0.00 Short cut
BX Thailand OMG/THB 886.29 0.00 Short cut
Stellar Decentralized Exchange OMG/XLM 3,478.46 0.00 Short cut
ABCC OMG/ETH 1,152.94 0.00 Short cut
EtherFlyer OMG/ETH 779.92 0.00 Short cut
OTCBTC OMG/ETH 6,717.04 0.00 Short cut
Radar Relay OMG/DAI 1,170.10 0.00 Short cut
Switcheo Network OMG/ETH 1,112.25 0.00 Short cut
BITBOX OMG/BTC 1,127.48 0.00 Short cut
CoinZest OMG/ETH 19,943.51 0.00 Short cut
CoinBene OMG/USDT 3,699.21 0.00 Short cut
Trade.io OMG/USDT 939.38 0.00 Short cut
BCoin.sg OMG/BTC 1,587.22 0.00 Short cut
CoinMex OMG/ETH 2,615.39 0.00 Short cut
DDEX To be provided later To be provided later To be provided later Short cut
xBTCe To be provided later To be provided later To be provided later Short cut
IDEX To be provided later To be provided later To be provided later Short cut
Korbit To be provided later To be provided later To be provided later Short cut
ProBit Exchange To be provided later To be provided later To be provided later Short cut
Independent Reserve To be provided later To be provided later To be provided later Short cut
CoinExchange To be provided later To be provided later To be provided later Short cut
Hadax To be provided later To be provided later To be provided later Short cut
SIMEX To be provided later To be provided later To be provided later Short cut
Liqui To be provided later To be provided later To be provided later Short cut
Bter To be provided later To be provided later To be provided later Short cut
Iquant To be provided later To be provided later To be provided later Short cut
YUNBI To be provided later To be provided later To be provided later Short cut
COBINHOOD To be provided later To be provided later To be provided later Short cut
Lykke To be provided later To be provided later To be provided later Short cut
coinone To be provided later To be provided later To be provided later Short cut
ZB To be provided later To be provided later To be provided later Short cut
Tidex To be provided later To be provided later To be provided later Short cut
Abucoins To be provided later To be provided later To be provided later Short cut
STEX To be provided later To be provided later To be provided later Short cut
BTC Markets To be provided later To be provided later To be provided later Short cut
Coinnest To be provided later To be provided later To be provided later Short cut
EXX To be provided later To be provided later To be provided later Short cut
POLONIEX To be provided later To be provided later To be provided later Short cut
C2CX To be provided later To be provided later To be provided later Short cut
YObit To be provided later To be provided later To be provided later Short cut
Cryptopia To be provided later To be provided later To be provided later Short cut
Braziliex To be provided later To be provided later To be provided later Short cut
Cashierest To be provided later To be provided later To be provided later Short cut
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Platform ERC20
Accepting
Hard cap -
Audit -
Stage -
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Market of major crypto coins *2019년 11월 18일 last update

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